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Old 01-03-2022, 08:15 PM   #1
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Should I tow my 2006 Rav 4?

Happy New Year to all.
I am a newbie Class A Motorhome owner (3rd Owner) of 1993 35'Winnebago Vectra with Cummings Diesel Pusher engine. I have been upgrading it completely and just have my generator and propane tank left to service.
I plan on traveling from Ft Lauderdale FL to Vancouver Island Canada, in March and I am debating on whether to tow my Rav 4.
Since I will travel alone I don't know if this is a good idea.
Also I would need to invest in the towing gear.
Is it easy to disconnect the car if I need to or is a real burden ?
I will be spending 6-8 months on Canada so the alternative is that I fly back to Florida and drive the car there separately. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Also, what kind of towing equipment is easy and safe enough for me to use.
I am a proficient driver and not nervous driver
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Old 01-12-2022, 01:01 PM   #2
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If you are looking at the 2006 RAV4, go to this link https://images.goodsam.com/newmotorh...yGuide2006.pdf check out page 28.


A Dinghy Towing Guide is published for each year vehicle. These are to be used as a guide, always check out your specific manual before towing.
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Old 01-12-2022, 05:02 PM   #3
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There are tons of websites with flat towing info. You first must insure that your RAV is flat towable.

If it is you'll need a baseplate installed on the car, a tow bar installed on the RV's hitch, lighting on the car and auxillary breaking on the car as well.

This equipment is available from a number of companies - the two largest are Blue Ox and Roadmaster. The Equipment costs ~ $2,500 and installation is usually another $1500 or so.

Alternatively you can buy a tow dolly that you drive the front wheel drive cars wheels up on and tow it behind your RV. A tow-dolly is usually less expensive and will let you tow just about any front wheel drive vehicle.
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Old 01-13-2022, 07:31 PM   #4
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Thank you so much.I will look into all your suggestions.However I think the tow dolly sounds the easiest to do.
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Old 01-13-2022, 07:35 PM   #5
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Thanks so much Tim.
I will check out the links which will be very useful.
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Old 01-14-2022, 08:54 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by benhamliz View Post
Thank you so much.I will look into all your suggestions.However I think the tow dolly sounds the easiest to do.
For purchase and initial set up yes, but then much more difficult than flat towing for everyday usage after initial setup. Harder to load and difficult to store at campgrounds.
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Old 01-14-2022, 09:41 AM   #7
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I have done both a Tow Dolly and Four Wheels Down.


Pros for the Tow Dolly are that just about any Front Wheel Drive Vehicle can be towed this way


For me the loading and unloading was a real PITA, I moved to four wheels down 7 years ago and have never looked back. Yes, it was expensive, and Yes, it was worth it to me.



My new to me DP came with a Tow Master Dolly, sold it to the guy that bought my Storm, but tried to talk him out of it.
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Old 01-14-2022, 10:48 AM   #8
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You can rent a tow dolly from UHaul for that trip at a fraction of the cost of buying and installing your own tow equipment. They have surge brakes, but only on the dolly wheels. But that should be fine given the size and weight of a DP.

As noted by above, loading is a bit more difficult, but manageable.

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Old 01-14-2022, 05:18 PM   #9
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If your Rav4 is AWD then a dolly is probably not an option. The owners manually should tell you what you need to know.
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Old 01-14-2022, 06:31 PM   #10
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There may be some items that are not quite as clear as you need, so I might statethem a different way.

On the motorhome, you are likely to already have the reciever hitch and you need to have a tow bar to go in that hitch if you are going with four down. Personally I would never go back to a tow dolly.

also on the rear of the MH, you are likely to have a big 7-pin connector with the wiring needed to do all the things needed to power the lights, turn signales, etc. on the car. But you will need what many call a tether to tie the Rv connector to one added on the front of the car.

A major part of the expense of settingup is the equipment and there are ways to cut that part if it is a major factor in your thinking. One big one is to shop the tow bar on e-bay! Used are often good enough as they actually wear very little other than collecting rust from hanging around on the back of the RV while camped or stored! I like Blue Ox but never used any others!

Then if looking for value, look at other than Rv places for the install work as many others do it cheaper. Think of the difference in going to a "specialty shop" versus where working people shop?
Truck hitch installers in my area do it for half the price of RV folks! They often also have the catalogs and info on ordering and installing what you need, so some talking the talk with several places and getting a written estimate can save a few hundred dollars.
It's the old story of quick and easy by drive in and say "do it" versus a bit more labor and time to sort lots to save lots!

hooking up is the main differencefor me. When doing dollies, it is cheaper but more work and some of that work is the dirty type. One has to manage to drag a dolly to the back of the RV and align it well enough to reach the hitch with the dolly tow point. Not always easy and often takes real thought to be able to do it in any campground with sloping roads and traffic wanting to get past. One person pulls a tow dolly, possibly uphill and connecting it to the hitch is not one I wanted to tackle after I passed fifty!
Then once you are hitched, you still have to drive the car onto the dolly and up tight against the front. Can be tricky if you have nobody to tell you to go 2 inches further left or right and you can't see? Then the fun part is getting down in the dirty and hugging the tires to get straps over or around them! On a hot day or nasty wet, I don't want that ever again!

With a tow bar like the Blue Ox, one pulls the Rv to a sopt out of the traffic, drives the car to more or less centered and about the right space from the MH and then gets out to connect. The tow bar arms are a sliding type that has lots of switvel and extend/retract motion to let you attach it to the tow car base plates if you get the car somewhat close to the right spot. When traveling alone, I bent a wire to attach to the hitch and had a flag on the end of the wire, so that when I got close enough the flag waved!!

On either system one still has to put the car in neutral or whatever is required and also plug in the tether and often a brake system for the tow car as most states require ist now. Brake away brakes are the name and it acts like the name. If the car hitch or something goes totally bad wrong, the car brakes are slammed on to stop the runaway!

Lots to study but a few pointers.
A current search on E-bay for Blue Ox for info on that route:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...+used&_sacat=0
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Old 01-14-2022, 06:58 PM   #11
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According to this, the Rav4's towability (4-down and dolly) is limited to certain years and transmissions:

https://www.google.com/search?q=can+...client=gws-wiz
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Old 01-16-2022, 05:11 PM   #12
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According to the 2006 Dinghy Guide the 2006 Toyota Rav4 with automatic transmission is not towable. See the guide below

https://images.goodsam.com/newmotorh...yGuide2006.pdf

If yours has a standard transmission it is towable.
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Old 01-17-2022, 07:48 AM   #13
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No - not flat towed

Found this on a four wheeling forum

Yes, some Toyota RAV4s can be pulled behind a motorhome as long as you buy the correct model with the correct transmission type. Only the manual transmission models from 1996-2000 can be flat-towed behind an RV. Both the automatic and manual models from 2001 can be towed, but from 2002 to 2005 (the last year Rav4s could be flat towed), only 4WD manuals are flat-towable.

Later-generation models from 2006 till now are not rated for flat towing. No Rav4 EV model can be dinghy towed.
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Old 01-17-2022, 03:33 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benhamliz View Post
Happy New Year to all.
I am a newbie Class A Motorhome owner (3rd Owner) of 1993 35'Winnebago Vectra with Cummings Diesel Pusher engine. I have been upgrading it completely and just have my generator and propane tank left to service.
I plan on traveling from Ft Lauderdale FL to Vancouver Island Canada, in March and I am debating on whether to tow my Rav 4.
Since I will travel alone I don't know if this is a good idea.
Also I would need to invest in the towing gear.
Is it easy to disconnect the car if I need to or is a real burden ?
I will be spending 6-8 months on Canada so the alternative is that I fly back to Florida and drive the car there separately. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Also, what kind of towing equipment is easy and safe enough for me to use.
I am a proficient driver and not nervous driver
Morich covered the subject very well. With regard to your specific question re ease of connecting/disconnecting: It is a piece of cake when towing 4-down. In my case I can hook up (or disconnect) my toad in 20 minutes ....... less if I have a helper. (I have read many posts where others say the same thing, BTW.)

I happen to have a (self installed) Blue Ox baseplate and a (very old) Demco tow bar that came with the MH; I believe any combination you choose will work as well.

Hope your Toyota turns out to be towable 4 down. Good times and safe travels to ya.



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