Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-02-2008, 01:58 AM   #41
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,456
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by sharon Grant:
As I said previously, I do not know too much about MH, But am trying to learn. We are buying in September.
With Boats, if there is a gas leak, the gas will sit in the bilge (the lowest level) till enough has escaped and it reaches the flame, usually around the floor level..
That may never be an issue with a motor home there possibly would alway be somewhere for the gas to escape and not build up, I hadn't thought about that. I like the suggestion about practicing using the escape window.

Cheers </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I look at most escape windows and don't see many older RVers capable of jumping out one and still be able to walk away.

Maybe a boat transom ladder to get someone closer to the ground might not be a bad idea.

On my previous coach the escape window was in the rear of the coach next to the roof ladder which could be used to climb down.

I did have to evacuate my family and pets from a motorhome that caught on fire while going down the highway at 65MPH with no brakes and can vouch for the effectivenes of having cats and small dogs in their carriers and large dogs on a harness at the time. We only had a brief moment when the fireballs cleared and we were able to exit before the smoke became a problem.

It was a brake fire and was a total loss.
__________________
Neil V
2001 Winnebago Adventurer WFG35U
NeilV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 04:13 AM   #42
Winnie-Wise
 
hamguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Mesa, AZ USA
Posts: 263
I have always been concerned with egress in case of fire. I am somewhat crippled and weigh about 200#. Wife is physically ok and a few # less.

Were I to have to scramble out the window, in the dark and fully 6' above ground, I would surely break something vital (even IF I was lucky enough to miss the power pedestal or water stand pipe).

So, I have been pondering an easy to use, lightweight and small ladder.

What I have come up with so far is this.

Materials-

~20' of rope (non-stretch)
1-8' closet pole or the like (sturdy enough to hold the weight).
8 Flat Washers with holes slightly larger than the rope.

Cut the pole into 18-20" lengths. Drill holes near each end sized to barely accommodate the rope diameter.

Tie one end of each rope to a pipe, pole whatever, long enough be wider than the window. It will wedge in at the bottom edge when in use.

Cut the rope into 2-pieces, long enough to reach near the (12-24") ground from the ledge of the window.

Slip a pole and washer on each rope. and move up to about 2-3' from the end. Tie knots equi-spaced on each rope and big enough to stay in the washer UNDER LOAD.

You would exit with your back facing out and your legs drooped over the window ledge. On my RV, this edge is very sharp so it would be prudent to toss a pillow on the ledge or otherwise accommodate that fact.

Continue this, adding pole-washer-knots for 2-4 more steps (I can't see the need for more than 3 for any size rig).

Since your body is outside from the waist down you need not put the first "step" less than 2-3' from the ledge. In other words, space them for your needs.

This is an outline of MY idea and you may have suggestions or thoughts of your own. I would hope you would share with us, or if this is a

NOTES-

1-I have tender feet so I keep shoes near the bed.
2-You will be working in a panic and the adrenaline will be racing.
3-Keep a flashlight near the window (your power will likely be out by then).
__________________
Wretched excess is just barely enough.

2002 Itasca Suncruiser - WH Chassis - 35U - 2006 Jeep Liberty
hamguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 04:42 AM   #43
Winnebago Camper
 
Roam America's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Fulltime - Currently somewhere in the lower 48
Posts: 7
or you could buy one here. Excess length would just lay on the ground.
__________________
John, Joyce & Zoie the Terrier. - Fulltime since `08

2017 Solitude by Grand Design
2012 Ford F-450 Lariat
Roam America is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 11:31 AM   #44
Winnebago Owner
 
steelheadbluesman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Zigzag, OR
Posts: 151
That's the ticket, K-Star! Good call
__________________
'07 Itasca 35L/W22 FULL-TIMING
1000 Trails - VFW - 5 Yrs Army
"NOT ALL WHO WANDER ARE LOST"
steelheadbluesman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 03:49 PM   #45
Winnebago Watcher
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3
I just finished installing an automatic halon fire supression system in the engine and genny compartment - about $350. Not bad insurance.
You might want to check www.firefight1.com. All you do is strap the bottles near the potential source. They are charged and have automatic release heads. These fires happen so quickly that they must be extinguised immediately to prevent spreading.

I also have three handheld extinguishers placed around inside, and in an outside bay. This is not an ad, just my own experience.
psyflyjohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 04:15 PM   #46
Winnie-Wise
 
Pubtym's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 359
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by psyflyjohn:
I just finished installing an automatic halon fire supression system in the engine and genny compartment - about $350. Not bad insurance.
You might want to check www.firefight1.com. All you do is strap the bottles near the potential source. They are charged and have automatic release heads. These fires happen so quickly that they must be extinguised immediately to prevent spreading.

I also have three handheld extinguishers placed around inside, and in an outside bay. This is not an ad, just my own experience. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks. Unit for the genny and underhood looks affordable and easy to install.
__________________
Pubtym, 20th SOS "Green Hornet" , Viet Nam 68-69,
2015 Thor A.C.E 29.3
Pubtym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 07:58 AM   #47
Winnebago Master
 
LK23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 527
How difficult is it to install the Halon fire supression system? Where should it be installed?
__________________
2017 Dutch Star 4369
Huey Pilot Vietnam 1971-72
Author of ACE, The Story of Lt. Col. Ace Cozzalio
2016 Independent Publishers Book Awards Winner
LK23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 05:36 PM   #48
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Salem Oregon USA/National
Posts: 7
Mac the fire guy here, I have been reading all the posts and it looks like there might be some questions out there on types of extinguishers you might need for an RV. I really don't want to get anything started if everyone is OK with the information you already have. Just let me know if you need more information. Thanks for your time and interest.
Mac
macthefireguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 05:49 PM   #49
Winnie-Wise
 
Pubtym's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 359
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LK23:
How difficult is it to install the Halon fire supression system? Where should it be installed? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Simple and affordable...affordable.. install examples @ www.firefight1.com

Give them a call for further questions.
__________________
Pubtym, 20th SOS "Green Hornet" , Viet Nam 68-69,
2015 Thor A.C.E 29.3
Pubtym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 06:25 PM   #50
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Salem Oregon USA/National
Posts: 7
Are you thinking about putting he Halon unit in you engine compartment? I now handle the complete line of Fire Fight. The SS 30 with the 170 degree head would work in the fridge compartment and inside your MH. The SS 100 or SS 200 Foam unit is better for your engine compartment. Hand held foams or wetting agents are also good. Now all you active or retired FF's don't get too carried away, this FOAM is all new and nothing like we used.
macthefireguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 03:42 AM   #51
Winnie-Wise
 
Pubtym's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 359
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by macthefireguy:
Are you thinking about putting he Halon unit in you engine compartment? I now handle the complete line of Fire Fight. The SS 30 with the 170 degree head would work in the fridge compartment and inside your MH. The SS 100 or SS 200 Foam unit is better for your engine compartment. Hand held foams or wetting agents are also good. Now all you active or retired FF's don't get too carried away, this FOAM is all new and nothing like we used. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

SS-25 for genny compartment...and fridge..and propane tank access bay..very affordable..easily installed...sized for the job..
__________________
Pubtym, 20th SOS "Green Hornet" , Viet Nam 68-69,
2015 Thor A.C.E 29.3
Pubtym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 10:34 AM   #52
Winnie-Wise
 
Cruzer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Sheboygan, WI
Posts: 306
I too have always been concerned about RV fires. The small OEM dry chemical extinguisher just doesn't do anything. I used to replace it with 3 larger dry chemical units but they too have limited ability.

First of all, dry chemical doesn't do your electricals any good. You'll be replacing lots of stuff when it's all over from the corrosion damage.

Secondly, on a diesel pusher the odds are it's going to start in the engine compartment. By the time you realize you're on fire it'll be toolate to do anything about it but pull over and bail out. The odds of a fuel leak or hydraulic line bursting and hitting that hot turbo are in favor of the fire, not the fire fighter.

So, I contacted Mac the Fire Guy and chewed his ear off gleaning information. I have to admit, he really knows his stuff. I replaced my dry chemical hand-held extinguishers with the designer foam units for a start but the most important step was to install an automatic engine extinguishing system.

I chose the Cold Fire system because of it's ability to "stick" to the fire. I've seen videos on the Cold Fire site showing them actually putting out a burning tire with a hand held Cold Fire unit. Try that with dry chemical. I was particularly impressed with the ability of Cold Fire to hold down a fire and not allow it to reflash, something that the various gasses aren't that good at.

In addition, I installed an alarm system to notify me. When driving a green LED tells me the system is armed and good to go. Should a fire begin the cold fire cylinder will dump it's contents over the engine area, cooling down the hot stuff as well as putting out the fire. At the same time the alarm goes off and I have time to pull over, stop the vehicle, and attack it with one of my handhelds should the need be there. If the automatic extinguisher doesn't put it out, chances are it'll fight a holding action until I can deal with it with wa handheld. If it's one of those "once every hundred years" Murphy's Law type fires that no one can stop then at the very least I'm given an early warning plus the system buys me valuable time to begin an orderly exit and grab a few important things.

I've detailed my installation on my website at www.rvcruzer.com/fireindex.htm with pictures, tips, links, and some basic fire extinguisher education. Feel free to check it out.
__________________
Mark & Leann Quasius
2016 Cornerstone 45A
2007 Allegro Bus 42QRP (Sold)
2012 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited - Rubicon
Cruzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2008, 08:58 AM   #53
Winnie-Wise
 
hamguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Mesa, AZ USA
Posts: 263
There are virtually an infinite number of causes of RV fires, the only ones that scare me are those that would threaten lives. Mine &/or DW's. That said, if a fire started during the day, I might..MIGHT make an attempt to put it out knowing it likely futile. While driving, I guarantee we will bail and take pix.

But, at night when asleep. A whole nother storey.

Nighttime fires are most likely electric caused. But I don't care. I just want to be able to get out. Most likely the adrenaline will be pumping, visibility will be near ZERO.

The window escape is almost as dangerous as the fire and for we 60+ and not in great shape folks, not a happy thought.

The drop from the window will most certainly break legs, hips or similar. Even getting into position to bail out will cause damage to the legs, stomach and, perhaps more.

I have come up with a rope ladder idea and as soon as I get to a town with a Home Depot, I am gonna buy the necessary mat'ls. Should be about 10-20 Bux max.

There have been suggestions about transom ladders but I found these to be no good due to length and step placement. In any event, commercial ladders are VERY EXPENSIVE ($129-250)for a one-time-use item.

My $0.02 only.

Dean
__________________
Wretched excess is just barely enough.

2002 Itasca Suncruiser - WH Chassis - 35U - 2006 Jeep Liberty
hamguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2008, 02:26 PM   #54
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Salem Oregon USA/National
Posts: 7
Dean, Mac the fire guy here, give this some thought before you go to get the rope. I'll bet you guys have replaced the bedspread with something really nice and strong. Put it out the window corner to corner, it makes it longer. If your escape hatch is at the head of your bed, who ever goes second will set on it and the first person goes out and holds the bedspread. If its on the passanger side then the second person stands on it. Have you decided who goes first? In other words does strong go first to catch weak, or does weak go first with strong to follow? How will you keep the window off of you? Is it a slider or push out? If it's a push out use a 2' piece of closet rod to keep the window off of you. It sounds tuff but it really does work.
macthefireguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2008, 03:09 PM   #55
Winnie-Wise
 
hamguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Mesa, AZ USA
Posts: 263
Hi Mac,

That sounds waaay too complicated to do while in a life threatening panic situation. My ladder ropes will be tied to a section of closet pole wider than the opening and the pushout window can bounce of our butts as we go down.

I will try it and report back after I build it.
__________________
Wretched excess is just barely enough.

2002 Itasca Suncruiser - WH Chassis - 35U - 2006 Jeep Liberty
hamguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2008, 04:46 PM   #56
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Northwestern Montana
Posts: 21
Nice informative read Cruzer, thanks. Thats a good looking fire suppression system you installed in the engine compartment. Hope you never have to use it. Nice coach also, I'm envious. Maybe someday----

Dieselclacker
__________________
Dieselclacker
dieselclacker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2008, 05:15 PM   #57
iRV2 Marketing
 
DriVer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Conway, SC
Posts: 886
You know that dry chemical fire extinguisher that we all have by our entry doors - throw it away and go to Home Depot (other) and buy a Foam type fire extinguisher.

One day you are going to need your extinguisher and the dry power one simply will not work as planned. I've seen where these types of extinguishers will just cake up and solidify.

The brand of extinguisher I have is a Kiddie. I don't remember the rating right off hand but it it's an excellent Class A and B extinguisher. If you have a Class C or electrical fire the foam will work to extinguish the surrounding materials but it's not rated for Class C fires.
__________________
03 Adventurer 38G, Workhorse W22
F&R Track Bars, Safety+ , Ultrapower, Taylor Extremes, SGII
TST 507, Blue Ox, SMI, Koni FSD, CrossFire
RV/MH Hall of Fame - Lifetime Member
DriVer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2008, 04:04 AM   #58
Winnie-Wise
 
Pubtym's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 359
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DriVer:
You know that dry chemical fire extinguisher that we all have by our entry doors - throw it away and go to Home Depot (other) and buy a Foam type fire extinguisher.

One day you are going to need your extinguisher and the dry power one simply will not work as planned. I've seen where these types of extinguishers will just cake up and solidify.

The brand of extinguisher I have is a Kiddie. I don't remember the rating right off hand but it it's an excellent Class A and B extinguisher. If you have a Class C or electrical fire the foam will work to extinguish the surrounding materials but it's not rated for Class C fires. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

...and I wonder what the cost difference is to Winnie...replacing current OE dry chem on production line versus foam ...like you mention here. At least, Winnie should offer foam extinguishers as option..to include one in bedroom.
__________________
Pubtym, 20th SOS "Green Hornet" , Viet Nam 68-69,
2015 Thor A.C.E 29.3
Pubtym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2008, 07:51 AM   #59
Winnebago Owner
 
FDchief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 137
Hello to all, I have been following this post and just thought I would put in my .02

Like many fire service professionals lurking on this forum, I too have been in the fire service for 30 years (will be retiring to full time in '09 ) I currently am a shift Battalion Chief who works for a FD that services 55 miles of I80 over Donner Summit to the Nevada state line. Needless to say I have seen my share of vehicle fires. Now to share my lessons learned in regards to mo-ho fires.

Firstly, in those 30 years, I have seen around six RV related fires, not a whole bunch, but impressive to say the least. All were in transit. None were from refridgerators. All were engine compartment fires. On gas units, this is a good reason for a drivers side door.
In one instance, a man was critically burned after crawling over the dog house (after it had been burned through) to reach the side door that he fell out of receiving a severe head injury. He passed away two weeks later from respiratory burn complications.

With diesel units the ones I have seen have been transmission fluid being released onto hot surfaces as the main cause. In both gas and diesel rigs a engine compartment extinguishing system would have slowed the fire, but may not have extinguished it. The big thing is to bring your rig to a stop in a safe area (not near heavy grass or brush, or under a tree), and to get out and start dreaming of your next motorhome. Because once the fire is well established, the best the fire department can do is protect exposures.

I highly recommend an extinguisher by the exit door and in your bedroom. Be sure that it has a rating of at least 2A-10B,C. These are available just about anywhere and are relatively inexpensive. Don't expect to be Red Adair and snuff out the red devil as the majority of the fire will probably be in confined spaces unreachable by your extinguisher. In stead, use your extinguisher to hold the fire until you can exit the motorhome. Shut any doors between you and the fire, it is amazing how much time you can buy yourself.

And in regards to propane, I leave mine on always, except when filling it. Unlike gasoline propane is very safe. And unlike popular belief, tanks will only BLEVE (boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion) after a lengthy time of direct flame impingement to the vapor space of the tank. What does this gibberish mean to you? Don't sweat propane, the odds are on your side.

In closing, this was a long post, but wanted to state that I belive RVs are very safe if you look at the numbers. Odds are you won't have problems if you keep a clean house and keep up the maintenance and identify problems before they happen.

Stay safe,
__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
Greg & Lynn (Full-Timing)
2011 Phaeton 42 QBH / Spartan Chassis
2003 Jeep GC Overland in Tow
FDchief is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2008, 08:52 AM   #60
Winnie-Wise
 
hamguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Mesa, AZ USA
Posts: 263
FDChief -

"I currently am a shift Battalion Chief who works for a FD that services 55 miles of I80 over Donner Summit to the Nevada state line."

Make sure you monitor your designated cook verrry carefully. Snark-snark.

__________________
Wretched excess is just barely enough.

2002 Itasca Suncruiser - WH Chassis - 35U - 2006 Jeep Liberty
hamguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Old motorhomes 48ratfink Vintage Rigs - Retro is cool! 6 10-04-2012 07:35 PM
Winnebago Unveils Industry-First Motorhomes in Louisville! FrontRangeRVer Winnebago General Discussions 7 12-02-2008 02:38 PM
Dash Covers for Motorhomes... Richard 34A General Maintenance and Repair 12 10-16-2007 07:44 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×