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Old 07-07-2008, 06:02 PM   #21
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The engine compartment fire suppression unit for Motor Homes, on macthefireguy's website, while expensive, is very cheap compared to the potential loss.
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:14 AM   #22
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I was notified almost immediately via mail when motorhomes were added to the re-call. However it took the better part of a year for the parts to get to my dealer to have it taken care of. In a way, sort of the same problem.
I still think it is a band aid approach to a larger problem.
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:11 AM   #23
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Carle:
I am just curious. Since this is a Winnebago Forum, and the fire pictures are spectacular, how many of these fires occured in Winnebago products? I am driving under the general impression that W'go does a pretty good job of engineering their circuits, tying their harnesses, routing and mounting their gas lines and venting important cavities.

Other than that, I see maintenance and equipment cleanliness as the most important factors along with just plain vigilence.

Of course, some things just happen, like running over something in the roadway that flies up and causes damage.

Still, what an ordeal to go through.

Carle McFarland, 2004 Journey 36G </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I had one in a 1995 winnebago Vectra on Memorial Day Weekend in 2006. The fire was P32 chassis related caused by a dragging front brake or wheel bearing and the Winnebago held it at bay for about 20 minutes before it got inside the coach. The fire department got there in 10 minutes but got off on the wrong exit even though they were within sight of us and took 15 minutes or so to turn around and come back. After almost half an hour on fire most of our posessions were recoverable even though many were sooty or scorched. The coach was a total loss.

The steel basement bins in the 95 are probably what protected us the most. Newer models with plastic basements probably will not do as well.

I am looking at fire suppression systems for the engine, gennerator, water heater and fridge to install on my current coach.
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:26 AM   #24
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Anyone know if the insurance premium on your coach will be reduced with the addition of a fire suppression system?
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:16 AM   #25
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It has been over 10 years since I filled out a fire report, and I cannot speak for fire reports being filled out on a national level. In N.J. my department fills out a fire report on every call it responds to, and have done so for roughly 20 years (at one time it was voluntary, but now mandatory). We used a state provided computer system software package to do so. I do remember when [I was the one] completing a fire report for a vehicle fire there was a choice of vehicle type. I don't recall there being a choice for RV. Maybe in the last 10 years RV's have been added. As numbers of incident types become more prevalent, categories are generally added. But these reports are analyzed by state and federal authorities. It is this type of evidence that forces vehicle manufacturers to do a recall. I don't think Ford is doing those truck cruise control switch recalls out of the goodness of their heart.

I carry a 2A10BC fire extinguisher, but I have had extensive training on how to use an extinguisher. I've showed my wife how to use them. The most important thing is to get yourselves out safely. Let the firefighters take care of the hazardous work - they're trained for it.
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:18 AM   #26
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My RV is in storage so I can't look at the fire extinguisher that I bought, but it was for gas, oil, chemical etc. fires. It was recommended by a few RV'ers that I'd met on the road. After watching these videos, I'm going to get one for the rear of the rig and for the driver's area. The one I have is mounted next to the door. And since I travel alone with pets, my practice with them is going to change too. Fancy, the pinscher, is usually buckled into the shotgun seat with a harness and a seat belt. I'm going to have her leash hooked up to her as well for a quick access . . . and a leash on Gracie as well, no matter how much she hates having that thing on when she's not going on a walk. That way, if I have to get out fast, they'll be leashed up and ready to go, I can tie them to something and grab the fire extinguisher. Wow, those tapes were disturbing. One more thing to worry about out here! And the reason I pay for the storage room with all my family heirlooms and photos. Don't want anything in the RV that can't be replaced . . . .
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:39 AM   #27
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by GraciesMom:
My RV is in storage so I can't look at the fire extinguisher that I bought, but it was for gas, oil, chemical etc. fires. It was recommended by a few RV'ers that I'd met on the road. After watching these videos, I'm going to get one for the rear of the rig and for the driver's area. The one I have is mounted next to the door. And since I travel alone with pets, my practice with them is going to change too. Fancy, the pinscher, is usually buckled into the shotgun seat with a harness and a seat belt. I'm going to have her leash hooked up to her as well for a quick access . . . and a leash on Gracie as well, no matter how much she hates having that thing on when she's not going on a walk. That way, if I have to get out fast, they'll be leashed up and ready to go, I can tie them to something and grab the fire extinguisher. Wow, those tapes were disturbing. One more thing to worry about out here! And the reason I pay for the storage room with all my family heirlooms and photos. Don't want anything in the RV that can't be replaced . . . . </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Good point about at least a harness on the pets. We have that for our two pugs and they are free to roam the coach underway. For a quick exit..we can grab hold of the harness..
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Old 07-30-2008, 09:11 PM   #28
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I replaced the OEM extinguisher (10-B:C) at the door with a 3-A:40-B:C unit. The OEM one is in the basement where the BBQ is stored. It comes out when the BBQ does, so it's handy if necessary.
One thing we can do is consider turning off the fridge once its cold (no propane flame then). If you can keep the door shut, it'll stay cold for quite a while. When you get to the campsite, go electric.
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Old 07-31-2008, 06:38 AM   #29
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I turn off the propane when I'm on the road no matter what. When I crank the rig, the propane is off. If I have things in the fridge that might go bad, I put them in a cooler with some ice, or put a bag of ice in a plastic container or plastic bag in the fridge and freezer. I've never had anything go bad traveling for a day. I usually don't drive long hours. The fridge has stayed perfectly cool. I don't stuff the fridge with groceries . . . I usually only buy a few days worth of food at a time. And I'm about to go on NutriSystem so I won't have much in the fridge anymore other than butter, milk, etc. I hauled a mini freezer full of salmon and halibut back from Alaska! THAT I worried over, but there was so much solid frozen fish in the freezer, no matter how long I drove, it didn't thaw out. Even in Denali, when I could only run the generator for a few hours a day to keep the freezer "freezin'", with the bag of ice in there and all the frozen fish, it never thawed out. It's been over a year and I'm still eating halibut!!
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Old 07-31-2008, 01:19 PM   #30
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I have read through this whole thread, Very interesting. Thanks for the tips
I do not know anything about Motor Homes, but I was very worried about a fire on our Boat.
I personally would never have a pilot light. So I rip out anything that I cannot have a valve to turn off.. My husband thought I was paranoid, Till he ripped the fridge out of the boat( a big job) and found the pilot light had slowly burnt the top of the cabinet, a 2inch circle of charcoal was under the top of the counter about two feet from the pilot light. There was also good ventilation and I was very diligent about dust around any vents...
I always hated that fridge when it was on Gas. I do not mind gas for the stove top that goes on and off after use.

I always turn my gas of at the tank. I replaced gas detectors a couple of times..I don't have any faith in them. The problem with leaking gas is it can go off with a big bang and start a big fire.
Another thing that can start fires, is dirty oil rags, stuffed into buckets in small unventilated spaces..Some one mentioned maintenance and due diligence.. Yes the trouble with being packed in like sardines is your neighbor may not think the same way..mmm lots to think about..the leash idea for the dogs is an excellent one.

Cheers Sharon
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Old 07-31-2008, 04:45 PM   #31
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I've said this before in another forum, but please allow me to say it again here: It's a good idea to make sure everyone in your rig knows exactly how to release and/or remove the escape window (normally found in the bedroom.) You never know from which direction fire may come, and the doors up front may not be accessible. If the flames can't quickly be controlled, getting out is always the biggest priority.
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Old 07-31-2008, 05:00 PM   #32
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by steelhead_bluesman:
I've said this before in another forum, but please allow me to say it again here: It's a good idea to make sure everyone in your rig knows exactly how to release and/or remove the escape window (normally found in the bedroom.) You never know from which direction fire may come, and the doors up front may not be accessible. If the flames can't quickly be controlled, getting out is always the biggest priority. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Amen...
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Old 07-31-2008, 05:35 PM   #33
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> If the flames can't quickly be controlled, getting out is always the biggest priority. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

<span class="ev_code_RED">QUICKLY</span> being the operative word. These rigs will go up faster than Clark Griswald's Christmas Tree.
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Old 08-01-2008, 07:28 AM   #34
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Day two after we bought our rig I went and spent $800 on new fire extinguishers. The cheap 10BC sits with the BBQ. I have three 1/2L Cold Fire extinguishers strategically placed in 3 locations forward, mid and aft to make sure we can get out under any circumstance. I also have a small Halon (actually the environmentally safe equivalent) and a CO2 extinguisher as these are more effective on electrical fires. I also care a 1L Cold Fire and another C02 in the toad in the event there is time after we get out to fight an engine fire and/or protect the toad.

You do need to remember to maintain your extinguishers too. The more sophisticated ones (like I listed above) need to be serviced by professionsals at least every couple of years. Even basic powder chemical type extinguishers need to be turned over and slapped on the sides and bottom every now and then. The powder packs down from the motions of the coach and when you go to use it it might not work very well or maybe not at all.

I've been looking at the MacTheFireGuy engine bay fire suppression systems for a while but the way my FL XC engine bay, cooling system and upper housing is laid out there isn't an effective place to mount the bottle as is. I think I'm going to fab a metal crossover bracket or something. This thread has re-prompted me to get on it soon. Thanks.
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Old 08-01-2008, 07:33 AM   #35
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One other comment on the source of engine fires in diesel pushers. At least one person I know suffered a catastrophic fire which the insurance company thinks was caused by a fuel leak from a seal degraded by the use of ULSD.

Yet another good reason to use a lubricity additive in rigs with pre 2007 EPA spec engines.
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Old 08-01-2008, 08:05 AM   #36
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by vicsryd:
One other comment on the source of engine fires in diesel pushers. At least one person I know suffered a catastrophic fire which the insurance company thinks was caused by a fuel leak from a seal degraded by the use of ULSD.

Yet another good reason to use a lubricity additive in rigs with pre 2007 EPA spec engines. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

ULSD?
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Old 08-01-2008, 08:31 AM   #37
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pubtym:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by vicsryd:
One other comment on the source of engine fires in diesel pushers. At least one person I know suffered a catastrophic fire which the insurance company thinks was caused by a fuel leak from a seal degraded by the use of ULSD.

Yet another good reason to use a lubricity additive in rigs with pre 2007 EPA spec engines. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

ULSD? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

U(ltra) L(ow) S(ulfer) D(iesel)
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Old 08-01-2008, 04:56 PM   #38
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In 50,000 miles of driving my RV, I have NEVER turned the propane off. In addition, I have never heard of an RV fire coming from an open valve. The new tanks have a safety valve that stops flow if a sudden pressure drop occurs.

How many propane powered vehicles blow up every day??

But, your boogie man may see it differently.
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Old 08-01-2008, 07:51 PM   #39
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I agree with you, Hamguy, in 15 years I've never turned off my main tank, except when I fill it up. Too much chance for sparks while filling, and I can't be certain that the station's equipment is leak-proof.
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Old 08-01-2008, 08:19 PM   #40
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As I said previously, I do not know too much about MH, But am trying to learn. We are buying in September.
With Boats, if there is a gas leak, the gas will sit in the bilge (the lowest level) till enough has escaped and it reaches the flame, usually around the floor level..
That may never be an issue with a motor home there possibly would alway be somewhere for the gas to escape and not build up, I hadn't thought about that. I like the suggestion about practicing using the escape window.

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