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Old 03-09-2021, 06:40 PM   #1
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Tires - blowouts/damage

All,
I have successfully blown both rear tires on my dual axle 31bhds one on each of the last two consecutive trips. The camper is less than 4 years old with less than 5 K miles on the tires. The brand of tire is Goodride. Any advice here? Is this just what to expect for our camping future? Do we need to look into a 14 or 16 ply tire? I just replaced the first blown tire with a Harland brand tire. Also, due to the blow outs we incurred other damage. The metal siding towards the bottom of the camper has been damaged in both blowouts. Suggestions on how to get a new piece of siding would be much appreciated.
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Old 03-09-2021, 07:58 PM   #2
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One of the big reasons I now insist on tire pressure monitor systems (TPMS) on any Rv we now use , is the big penalty we pay if we don't catch a tire going low, getting hot, etc. until it does blow out.
Remember the days when there were almost weekly news of Ford Explorers, rolling over when tires blew out? A good part of that was traced back to underinflated tires and it doesn't happen nearly as often now that cars are required to have TPMS.
I see that as a definite cause/effect thing and want the same protection on my RV.

The system may cost several hundred dollars but that is certainly cheap compared to what can happen if I don't notice a tire that is running just a bit flat and getting hot!

On my brother's trailer it was several thousand dollars to rebuild the side.
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Old 03-10-2021, 08:00 PM   #3
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I am a owner operator and haul new cars wit my 2019 Peterbilt. I only buy name brand Michelin drives and Continental steer tires. Always always always tire pressure and more ply is the best. Low pressure is the worst thing for blow outs ! I am replacing my tires on my coach next week with Michelin 275/80/22.5. Hopefully this helps !


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Old 03-11-2021, 03:36 PM   #4
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Recommend a TPMS.

Have you weighed your trailer to be sure it is not overloaded?
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Old 03-11-2021, 05:03 PM   #5
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Like others said check tire pressure often , double checking weight of unit, tire rating and age of tires even if the rv is 4 years old tires could be older
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Old 03-12-2021, 05:30 AM   #6
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I see lots more reports of tire blowouts for ST (Special Tire) on trailers than for LT (Light Truck) tires on small (under 31') motorhomes.

I also had blowouts on ST tires on a travel trailer I owned, but I didn't have a TPMS at the time. I since have installed a TPMS on all RV's I have owned.

1) You might consider upgrading to LT tires that are the same size and load bearing capacity.
2) From what I see online it looks like the max tire pressure for your ST225/75R15D tires is 65psi. KEEP the tires at MAX pressure. Measure and inflate when the tires are cold (outside air temp and not in the sun) in the morning.
3) The reason for max pressure on the tires is that a dual axle trailer puts a huge amount of sideways stress on the tires when making a very sharp turn on dry pavement. The max pressure allows them to slip easier on sharp turns.
4) Try to not make a U turn where the tow vehicle has the steering wheel turn to full lock one side or another.
5) The max load for each tire is 2540 pounds which gives a max load bearing weight total for the 4 tires of 10,160 pounds. Since your GVWR for the trailer is 8800 pounds and almost 900 of that goes onto the hitch, you are not likely to overload the tires when inflated to max pressure. Not matter how much you may to overload the trailer. You only have 1360 pounds of CCC (cargo carrying capacity) and that includes any fresh water, black & gray water, propane and all the stuff you put in the trailer. It is very easy to put 1000-1500 pounds of clothes, food and other gear in the trailer.
6) For more detailed info about tires go to this website written by a retired tire engineer: https://www.rvtiresafety.net/2011/03...and-roger.html
7) For details specific to ST tires, in the link just above, scroll down the list of topics on the left side of the page to entries for ST tires.
8) Also there is lots of great info about TPMS in the link above.
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Old 03-12-2021, 07:48 AM   #7
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When we first owned Travel Trailers we seemed to blow one or two tires per year. We lost 6 in 10 years. We bought the tires at Discount Tire and they replaced them for free. THEN we finally wised up and instead of putting the same exact tire on each time for free, we brought all new load rated “E” tires with 12 plys. I also started listening to folks that told me to run the tires at max pressure (80 psi on my tires). I had been thinking 65 psi was “plenty”.

After the new tires and running them at 80psi I never blew another tire again in the next 5-yrs I owned a Travel Trailer.

I can be slow to learn about things. When I was blowing tires the only thing I learned was how to change them quickly.
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Old 03-14-2021, 05:47 PM   #8
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My 2020 trailer came with Goodride tires. I neglected to check the manufacturer's date, and they will be 3 years old before our first road trip :(

I have been researching this a lot, and as usual there are many anecdotes and opinions. Everyone does seem to agree that staying on top of pressure and perhaps also temperature will minimize your risk. I bought a TPMS product, and also an infrared temperature gun. Protecting them from UV and chemical exposure also helps. I have protective covers for them too.

I know for a fact I hate dealing with flat tires of any type. I've never incurred ancillary damage with a flat before, but I'm quite certain I would hate that even more!

We're going to replace our Goodrides with Goodyear Endurance before our first major road trip. I'll keep the "new" Goodrides, find some cheap rims, and mount them for winter storage. I intend to upgrade to Goodyear Endurance ST215/75-14 tires. They can handle a little more weight, and are only slightly larger diameter.

I found this webpage to be helpful, especially when it comes to the discussion about using LT tires on your trailer. Not so coincidentally, I just bought Michelin Defender LT tires for our F150 tow vehicle:

https://popupbackpacker.com/tire-pre...-tow-vehicles/
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Old 03-14-2021, 06:45 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clayowensby View Post
All,
I have successfully blown both rear tires on my dual axle 31bhds one on each of the last two consecutive trips. The camper is less than 4 years old with less than 5 K miles on the tires. The brand of tire is Goodride. Any advice here? Is this just what to expect for our camping future? Do we need to look into a 14 or 16 ply tire? I just replaced the first blown tire with a Harland brand tire. Also, due to the blow outs we incurred other damage. The metal siding towards the bottom of the camper has been damaged in both blowouts. Suggestions on how to get a new piece of siding would be much appreciated.
I have had 2 class C motorhomes, first for 11 years and 2nd for 16+ years. 1st motor home came with bias tires, which I replaced immediately with LT radials from Winston tires. I had a tire blow the next year. I always check my tires and pressures prior to a trip. After the blow out I check every time before I start driving. On the first motor home I replaced 6 tires which my checks showed to be failing. Some of these failures occurred during the middle of a trip. You haven't had any fun until you wake up in the morning and find two flat tires at the grand canyon and nearest Discount tires 60 miles away. My motor home was weighed and was within specifications. My second motor home came with Michelin LT tires. After 6 years of use I replaced with Michelin RV tires. The Michelin RV tires were then replaced at the 9 1/2 year age based on tire manufacturing date with new Michelin RV tires. The Michelin tires never showed any cracks or visible ageing. I never had a problem with them and yes I still do my tire checks. I strongly recommend checking the tires before and during a trip and weighing your RV to ensure it is not over loaded.
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Old 03-14-2021, 06:52 PM   #10
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Buy quality tires and stay away from the cheap imports. You get what you pay for.
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Old 03-14-2021, 08:25 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by 09 harley View Post
Buy quality tires and stay away from the cheap imports. You get what you pay for.
Good luck finding a 15” ST tire that’s not made in China. On our last TT I switched to 16” LT tires. Same load capacity and quality construction.
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Old 03-14-2021, 09:23 PM   #12
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Do you happen to have flexible valve extensions on those duals? We were running 6 brand new Michelin RVs on our first rv - Mini-Winnie and blew three of them on our way from Washington state to Georgia before we figured out those flexible extensions were at fault. They were installed by the company that mounted the new Michelins but they weren't stabilized to the adjoining wheel. They were flexing constantly as we traveled and caused the blowouts. I only use the solid valve extensions since then and no more problems.
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Old 03-14-2021, 10:36 PM   #13
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I had Goodride tires. Came with the trailer. I know the inflation was correct. Doesn't help when running poorly constructed tires. Took out part of the underside of my travel trailer. Everyone should immediately replace the low quality tires that come on the new campers.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:15 AM   #14
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I’d have to recommend the crossfire system as it will balance the air pressure between the two duals down to 10 psi below their target pressure ( inside tires usually run hot) and you can get a visual indication of approximate tire pressure in the pair so any time you stop for a break, a quick walk around let’s you know that you are good to go without taking a gauge out. A slow leak on an inner tire might be missed on a long day of traveling.
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Old 03-15-2021, 08:52 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Out N About View Post
I’d have to recommend the crossfire system as it will balance the air pressure between the two duals down to 10 psi below their target pressure ( inside tires usually run hot) and you can get a visual indication of approximate tire pressure in the pair so any time you stop for a break, a quick walk around let’s you know that you are good to go without taking a gauge out. A slow leak on an inner tire might be missed on a long day of traveling.
The "duals" in this thread are Axles as in Travel Trailer tires on two axles. Not dually tires on a motorhome or truck. The Crossfire system isn't setup for connections between multiple axles.
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Old 03-15-2021, 09:55 AM   #16
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The absolute BEST method for detecting a slow leak is to install a TPMS system on your vehicles.

If you pick up a nail or screw as you start out in the morning you will not know you have a problem until the tire blows.

PERHAPS if you are luck you might see an way underinflated tire when you stop for a break.

Because of the fact that most RV's are sold so that the weight of the RV is right at the max the tires can handle with max pressure, it is highly unlikely you will be able to detect an underinflated tire just by looking at it.

It is practically impossible to visually see that a modern day tire is 10% to 15% below the correct pressure for the load. It is likely the pressure will have to drop by 30% to 50% before you can see the difference.
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Old 03-16-2021, 02:13 AM   #17
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Number one cause of blow outs is underinflated tires. If you feel sway or the trailer wanders at all then check the inflation at the next service station has always been my rule running down the road with anything on wheels.

I suspect that the number two cause of trailer tire blow outs is running down the road at 70 plus miles per hour. And it should become a serious offence speeding with a travel trailer.

Two years ago I was going fishing with my truck tent by myself up the Coquihalla highway. So I did the legal speed limit which is 120 klicks, or 74.5 miles per hour. It was a hot sunny day and the pavement would have been fairly hot even up at high elevation. A Ford F250 pulling a rig went past me doing at least 75 to 80 and more as he sped off on the superhighway in the coast mountains of BC. I caught up to him with the trailer over the bank rolled and smashed to pieces going down the Clearwater hill outside Merit BC. He and his compatriots were standing looking dazed on the shoulder with cell phones in hand. They were just very lucky that the trailer popped the hitch IMO!

I wonder what the idiot was thinking or if he was thinking at all. Most likely he wanted to get to the incredible may fly hatches on a few of the lakes before I did.

Trailer tires are rated for 65 miles per hour for very good reasons!
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Old 03-16-2021, 12:22 PM   #18
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Another consideration that most people do not take into account is elevation. From experience with a Bucks bags pontoon boat pwc going from Kamloops up to a lake at over 5000 feet elevation for great late season chironomid fishing: Air pressure increases considerably going up hills! THE BOAT WENT BANG taking it off my truck and I was left with shore fishing only!
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Old 03-16-2021, 05:25 PM   #19
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Some ST tires are now rated at 75mph or better. I don’t recommend towing that fast, but the tire ratings have improved.
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Old 03-16-2021, 06:24 PM   #20
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Some ST tires are now rated at 75mph or better. I don’t recommend towing that fast, but the tire ratings have improved.
Here in BC our highways are famous for creating what is called a Cariboo alligator. The stretches on 19 south of Williams Lake in Cariboo country usually have a few blown trailer recaps sitting there waiting to bight you as you go around the corner.

Then if an alligator left by a transport truck doesn't smash up the undercarriage of your trailer or car or whatever: then the mule deer might decide to make you and your rig drive more sensibly if not scare you silly.

I have no qualms about speed limiting travel trailers, because I don't mind letting others pass and always try to allow others go by, when safe to do so. But there is no way I am going to run our rig at over 65 mph for extended periods of time. I have seen far too much carnage on our "Highways From Hell"

It is the inconsiderate RV owners who like to run on cruise control in convoys blocking the left lane or speed up as soon as a passing lane opens on single lane stretches: then drive like a bat out of hell at 80 mph on straight stretches where others can pass that give us all a bad rap.
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