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Old 06-02-2018, 07:15 AM   #1
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Ford Explorer

I have a 2016 Ford Explorer with the tow package. I知 looking at either the 1808 or 2106FBS as possible trailer options. Was wondering if anyone out here has any real world experience with either of those combinations. It will be just be my wife and I and our dog. Thanks in advanced for any advice.
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Old 06-02-2018, 09:16 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Shadow2353 View Post
I have a 2016 Ford Explorer with the tow package. I知 looking at either the 1808 or 2106FBS as possible trailer options. Was wondering if anyone out here has any real world experience with either of those combinations. It will be just be my wife and I and our dog. Thanks in advanced for any advice.

I think the trailers are too big for an Explorer once you have them loaded.



We need more information about your Explorer from the weight stickers to run the numbers. I don't know if the Explorers have a separate payload sticker. It might be the same one that has the tire inflation information. If not it might be on the vehicle information sticker. Either way look for a statement that says something similar to, maximum weight of occupants and cargo is: some weight or maximum or maximum payload = some weight. What is this weight rating?


There will be a sticker that shows the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) along with the axle ratings (GAWR). What does it say? What engine to you have?



What will be the weight of all passengers, luggage and cargo you will be taking in the Explorer with you? You are also going to need to add in 75 - 100 lbs for the weight distributing hitch head.



You can't go by the dry weights of trailers to size them to a vehicle as they will always weight more. We pack light but with the second propane tank, batteries and our stuff we add about 1000 lbs to the trailer who's shipped weight is heavier than the published dry weight due to factory installed options. Likewise the dry hitch weight will not reflect a realistic tongue weight of the loaded trailer. Tongue weights run 10% - 15% of the trailer weight. Commonly they are in the 12% - 15% range. When looking at trailers or tow vehicles I use 13% as a rule of thumb.


Using 1K lbs of trailer cargo and 13% for tongue I come up with 4560 lbs and 4705 lbs for the two trailers. At 13% for tongue the weights are 592 lbs and 611 lbs which are over you maximum 500 lbs tongue weight. You could get by with tongue weights of 10% and 11% but that means balancing the trailer cargo for every trip and would require weighing it every time which isn't practical.



So what can you tow? Again using a 13% tongue weight equal to 500 lbs (maximum for vehicle receive) the maximum loaded trailer weight would be 3846 lbs. This would be less if the tongue percentage is higher or more if the tongue percentage is lower. This all assumes you have the available vehicle payload to handle 500 lbs. It could be less depending upon all those weights I asked about above.
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Old 06-02-2018, 10:04 AM   #3
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I tow my 2000 lb boat with no problem. You've got the tow package. Go online with Ford and ask. Their online help is great.
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Old 06-02-2018, 02:03 PM   #4
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I tow my 2000 lb boat with no problem. You've got the tow package. Go online with Ford and ask. Their online help is great.

The most a 2016 Explorer is rated to tow is 500/5000 lbs. That is with the tow pkg and a 3.5L Ecoboost. Add in a lot of vehicle options and that rating decreases. The trailers the OP is asking about will have a loaded weight of over twice your boat. Their tongue weights will be reaching if not be over the 500 lb maximum tongue weight of the vehicle. Depending upon the available payload 500 lbs might not even be available for tongue weight further reducing the maximum tongue weight and therefore trailer weight.The only way to know for sure is to obtain the sticker weights and run the calculations for the OP's specific vehicle as they vary from vehicle to vehicle depending upon how they are equipped.
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Old 06-02-2018, 03:45 PM   #5
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Here are my specific numbers the GAWR for the front axel 3080lbs the rear is 3350lbs max cargo weight is 1214. The GVWR is 6180 for the Explorer the GCWR is 10150
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Old 06-02-2018, 05:57 PM   #6
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The max cargo is what you have available for all occupants, their cargo and the weight of the hitch receiver. That number subtracted from the 1214 will give you the payload available to handle the tongue weight of the trailer.



Without the estimated weights of the occupants, personal items and other cargo I can only give you examples.



As an example for two adults with a combined weight of 350 lbs, personal items of 100 lbs, dog of 50 lbs and 100 lbs for the hitch receiver the calculation would be:

350 + 100 + 50 + 100 = 600

1214 - 600 = 614
In this example you would have 614 lbs of payload available for the trailer tongue weight. Since the factory rating is 500 lbs maximum in this example it is the tongue weight rating that is the limiter.


Using these same assumptions we can see what you GCWR allows for a trailer and calculate its tongue weight.



6180 - 1214 = 4966 base vehicle weight

4966 + 600 = 5566 loaded vehicle weight
10150 - 5566 = 4584 available for trailer

4584 X .13 = 596 tongue weight



Again tongue weight is a limiting factor but so is the GCWR with loaded trailer estimates of 4560 and 4705 lbs.



If you are anywhere near close to the GVWR your max trailer weight drops to a little under 4K lbs.



I still think the trailers are too much for your vehicle and you need to be looking at something under 3800 lbs loaded. Just beware there are a number of unscrupulous dealers who will tell you your vehicle can tow any trailer on the lot just to make the sale. Once it is off their lot they could care less if it is dangerous or causes excessive wear and tear on your vehicle.



I towed with a 2001 Explorer for a number of years that had higher published tow ratings than the current models. Once all of the math was completed the max I could do was around 3700 lbs. It wasn't until we bought the F-150 that we were able to tow significantly more but even with it we had to watch options to be sure to have enough payload for camping stuff and the trailer.
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Old 06-02-2018, 08:11 PM   #7
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Thanks for the information it looks like the 1706FB might be a better fit
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Old 06-03-2018, 07:43 AM   #8
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Is there anyone out there who has had experience with the 1706fbs or the other units?
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Old 06-03-2018, 07:48 AM   #9
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It might be if you watch your weight to keep it under 3800 lbs. A 1705RD or Drop 170S would also be in that weight range. We traveled light in our previous trailer with only 500 lbs of cargo give or take. That gave us a loaded weight between 3100 and 3200 lbs. In the 2106FBS we are closer to 1K lbs of cargo.
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Old 06-03-2018, 02:02 PM   #10
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Shadow, loaded up both these TTs will be 5000 pounds. It’s just no fun pulling at maximum...none. I’m also not a fan of front wheel drive and TTs.
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Old 06-03-2018, 03:38 PM   #11
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“Thanks for the information it looks like the 1706FB might be a better fit”

I looked at that model’s predecessor. Without a slide it’s very small. Where will you sit? Dinette gets uncomfortable quickly. Lastly, step in that shower. Close curtain and try to soap up. If you are small, possibly. It is a tandem axel and that’s good. I’m not a fan of any of the 17XXs.
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Old 06-03-2018, 10:44 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by old_engineer View Post
The max cargo is what you have available for all occupants, their cargo and the weight of the hitch receiver. That number subtracted from the 1214 will give you the payload available to handle the tongue weight of the trailer.



Without the estimated weights of the occupants, personal items and other cargo I can only give you examples.



As an example for two adults with a combined weight of 350 lbs, personal items of 100 lbs, dog of 50 lbs and 100 lbs for the hitch receiver the calculation would be:

350 + 100 + 50 + 100 = 600

1214 - 600 = 614
In this example you would have 614 lbs of payload available for the trailer tongue weight. Since the factory rating is 500 lbs maximum in this example it is the tongue weight rating that is the limiter.
Where does tongue weight fit in with a load distributing hitch? Do you count the entire tongue weight or do you subtract the amount you have distributed back to the trailer from payload, tongue weight rating or both? What about the part you have distributed onto the TV front axle? It would still add to payload but would it subtract from the max tongue weight rating?

I noticed my 2002 F350 is only rated for a tongue weight of 500 lbs, same as an F150, unless I use weight distribution then it jumps to 1,250 Lbs. The F150 jumps to 880 lbs, and the total allowable trailer weight increases a lot with WD for both. I wonder if the Explorer has more tongue/towing capacity with weight distribution.
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Old 06-04-2018, 08:51 AM   #13
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"Where does tongue weight fit in with a load distributing hitch? Do you count the entire tongue weight or do you subtract the amount you have distributed back to the trailer from payload, tongue weight rating or both? "

Tongue weight is used as one of the factors that determines if you need a WDH. Yes, you count the entire tongue weight against payload. Don't forget to factor in the WDH itself....50 to 90 pounds or so.
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:05 AM   #14
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Where does tongue weight fit in with a load distributing hitch? Do you count the entire tongue weight or do you subtract the amount you have distributed back to the trailer from payload, tongue weight rating or both? What about the part you have distributed onto the TV front axle? It would still add to payload but would it subtract from the max tongue weight rating?

I noticed my 2002 F350 is only rated for a tongue weight of 500 lbs, same as an F150, unless I use weight distribution then it jumps to 1,250 Lbs. The F150 jumps to 880 lbs, and the total allowable trailer weight increases a lot with WD for both. I wonder if the Explorer has more tongue/towing capacity with weight distribution.

The decision on whether a WDH is required is based on the entire tongue weight. It should also include any weight carried behind the axle in the tow vehicle.



The 2016 Explorer per the Ford Towing Guide has a maximum tow rating of 500/5000 lbs. and requires a WDH to get that amount. It is the 500 lb tongue weight that is the main limiting factor here. It limits the maximum trailer weight to around 3800 lbs or less depending upon loaded tongue weight.



There are nice trailers out there that would meet those requirements for a GVW but they aren't spacious. Someone could also go with a larger trailer that has a low UVW and then pay close attention to how much cargo you carry. It can be a pain but let's someone get by until they can buy more vehicle. We went the route of sizing the trailer to our Explorer and replaced the trailer after we upgraded to the F-150. It gave us 4.5 years on the previous trailer, our first, and we were able to learn about what we needed, wanted and didn't need to have when we went shopping for this one.
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:26 AM   #15
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Shadow and bigb, you can of course do as you wish but the numbers of your Explorer limit your safe towing abilities and will strain the TV. I'm a GM guy but the Traverse numbers are about the same and why I stayed with Tahoe...my third. The new Expedition looks real good and goes up to 9,300 pounds...900 more than my 2015 Tahoe.
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Old 06-04-2018, 08:43 PM   #16
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Upgrading my TV is not an option right now. If I知 going to stay with a Winnebago it looks like the 1706FBS or one of Minnie drops is the best option right now. I want to be safe and not stressed about weight etc. Having an RV is supposed to reduce stress not add a bunch more. I appreciate all the comments everyone
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:19 PM   #17
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The 190RD is light and has a slide and dry bath.
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Old 06-06-2018, 05:43 AM   #18
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Upgrading my TV is not an option right now. If I知 going to stay with a Winnebago it looks like the 1706FBS or one of Minnie drops is the best option right now. I want to be safe and not stressed about weight etc. Having an RV is supposed to reduce stress not add a bunch more. I appreciate all the comments everyone
This is the most important thing to know about owning an RV. If it stresses you then you won't use it.
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