RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-05-2020, 10:06 AM   #21
Winnebago Master
 
Goodspike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 1,354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kg0gp View Post
My guess would be, because switches have an energized state and not energized, it is set to the least on time expected, 1 to save power, 2 save the switch less actual "on" time, my opinion only...lol
Another good guess. I like that better than the load guess.
Goodspike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2020, 11:54 AM   #22
Site Team
 
creativepart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spring Branch, TX
Posts: 3,046
Here's the real reason:

Quote:
The transfer switches used in RVs are generator priority switches. This means that the switch will connect to shore power when under normal use or even when there is no power present. As soon as the transfer switch detects the presence of 120 volt power on the generator input lines it will switch over to the generator's inputs and drop the connection to shore power. Transfer switches are designed so that only one input can be connected at a time in order to prevent any backfeeding of electrical power back down the other input line, which would be a hazardous condition. In addition, RV transfer switches generally have a built-in delay so that the generator can come up to speed and warm up a bit for actually switching the load. This prevents stalling or stumbling that could cause the generator to die if the air conditioners or other heavy loads while the engine was still cold and not producing full power.
__________________
2017 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2016 Lincoln MKX Toad
creativepart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2020, 02:18 AM   #23
Winnebago Owner
 
danhannah's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Washington State
Posts: 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodspike View Post
I've never used one either, but your guess was my first thought. Also, maybe it just assumes that shore power from an RV park is crap!
I like this answer!
__________________
_______________________
2014 Itasca 27n
danhannah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 05:36 PM   #24
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 12
We have an 87 Brave and ours has a switch on the dash which allows checking each of the batteries. One thing that has not been mentioned is the amount of gasoline in your tank. Ours needs to have at minimum 1/3 of a full tank of gas for it to start or it will only crank. You should have a gauge which tells your generator hours on it as well…helpful for keeping track of oil changes and such.
I watched a video on YouTube for a 1988 Chieftain restoration done years ago which was helpful.
MIkey3air is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 06:05 PM   #25
Winnebago Camper
 
Farco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 18
Yes! You need House batteries!
The Generator gets it’s power from them!
Now walk around the RV and look for a small exhaust pipe
That’s where the generator is.
Open the doors by the pipe.
It’s probably an Onan Generator.
Look for the oil dipstick. It’s a round cap that unscrews to
read the oil level. Cap looks much like that of a lawn mower.
Make sure it has oil in it.
Once you have batteries in, hold the starter button in 15 second intervals to see if it will start. It will take a few tries until it pulls fuel from the main fuel tank. Make sure you have more than 1/4 tank of fuel in main tank.
__________________
2000 V/10 Adventurer 32/V 25,000 Miles!
Farco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2020, 12:29 PM   #26
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 23
The salesman told me to hold the stop button (on the control panel) for three seconds, then push the start button. (Make sure the propane switch is on...also located on my control panel.) That didn’t work so I looked on you tube and a guy said to hold the stop button for 15 seconds, I did, and when I pushed the start button it started right up!!
Birdie2017 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2020, 09:51 AM   #27
US1
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 14
The purpose of holding the stop button in for 15 sec is to prime the carb. If the gen has been sittting for awhile, the fuel has evaporated. 3 seconds is not enough time to draw fuel into the carb and fill it, thus the 15 seconds rule. You can’t overdue it by holding the stop in longer. The float will close the needle/seat once the carb is full of fuel. The fuel pump won’t override the needle. This is providing the needle/seat are in good condition. Today’s fuel is hard on carbureted motors. The ethanol evaporates and leaves a scale in the float bowl which can plug the passages. Youll have less issues if you install a fuel shut off valve between the fuel pump and gen, and then close the valve and run the gen dry of fuel when you expect the gen to sit unused for long periods of time (months).
US1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2020, 10:40 AM   #28
Site Team
 
creativepart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Spring Branch, TX
Posts: 3,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farco View Post
Yes! You need House batteries!
The Generator gets it’s power from them!
Farco, just a note... not all Winnebago RVs, and certainly not all RVs in general use the House batteries to start the generator. A pretty large number of RVs use the Chassis batteries to start the genset.

I'm not sure what causes the manufactures sometimes use the House batteries and sometimes use the Chassis batteries for generator starting. But it's true.

My 2017 Adventurer is one that starts the generator from the Chassis battery.
__________________
2017 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2016 Lincoln MKX Toad
creativepart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2020, 10:49 AM   #29
Winnebago Camper
 
Farco's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 18
Creative: I was basing my reply to what the original poster described.
Both Class A m homes I’ve owned used the house batteries to run the genset.
__________________
2000 V/10 Adventurer 32/V 25,000 Miles!
Farco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2020, 11:03 AM   #30
Winnebago Master
 
Goodspike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 1,354
Quote:
Originally Posted by creativepart View Post
I'm not sure what causes the manufactures sometimes use the House batteries and sometimes use the Chassis batteries for generator starting. But it's true.
Based on post 12 here I made the assumption they were all the same and then realized that probably wasn't true. I apparently edited that earlier post, because whatever I said is gone. As to why they pick one over the other, one guess would be location of the generator relative to the two battery locations. They probably tend to go the closer battery assuming it's a significant difference in length.

Thinking about it logically there's no one best answer. But one advantage of using the coach battery is it is much less likely to be run down, so much more likely to be able to start the generator. But I guess if you start the generator too many times without driving anywhere then you may not be able to start the coach!.
__________________
2019 2106 DS
2019 Colorado Duramax
Goodspike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2020, 02:10 PM   #31
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Pflugerville/Austin, Tx
Posts: 2,351
One reason to start the chassis engine before trying to start the genset is that it is more reliable in most cases. The RV often uses the engine alternator to charge the chassis and the coach batteries as we drive, so if we start the engine and let it connect to the coach and the start battery through the solenoid, we get a combo of coach battery, start battery as well as alternator output.
If we do that, we get all three instead of any one single point for power. Most newer RV have so many extra-care items built in that it really gets down to understanding what they are doing for us and then when they fail, it also gets more complex to sort out what to fix.
Keeps a forum much more active , though!
__________________
Richard
2015 Winnebago Vista 31KE on 2014 chassis
Morich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 12:18 AM   #32
Winnebago Watcher
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 3
I'm sure you have figured this out by now but we have a 87 Elandan and inside the engine compartment in the front is a switch that has to be off or on depending on if you are using the generator or shore power I believe. Ours wouldn't work until we flipped that switch. Now we get juice but it won't turn over to run. Seems were not getting a spark so here I am looking to see what others have found.
SabrinaSN is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
generator


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Transfer Switch Operation - Shore vs. Generator Power BattChief Electrical | Charging, Solar and Electronics 7 08-14-2010 04:03 PM
Dash A/C operation? SCVJeff General Maintenance and Repair 8 07-04-2007 11:12 AM
Cummins ISL & Jake brake operation on cruise control? John_Canfield Running Gear, Axles, Brakes, Wheels and Tires 13 09-15-2006 06:58 AM
Surround Sound Operation? LK23 Tech | Toys and Gear 12 02-28-2006 06:01 PM
Exhaust brake operation Arv Running Gear, Axles, Brakes, Wheels and Tires 10 12-14-2005 07:12 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×