Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-25-2014, 08:19 PM   #1
Winnebago Watcher
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2
Valve stems

I was tinkering around recently on our new-to-us Sightseer 30A. I decided to check the air pressure in the tires. Front tires-no problem. Rear outer tires-no problem. Rear inside tires-Whoa! Where are the darn valve stems? After crawling around a bit I found them...they are on the inside of the inside tires.
My questions are:
Is this common?
Is this safe?
How important is it to change them?
Cost?
At the very least this will be a PIA.
rwp48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2014, 09:13 PM   #2
Winnebago Owner
 
dnystrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 178
You mean you have to crawl under the coach to get to them?
That's not the way it should be. You should be able to access
from the outside. You have to hunt a little for the stem but it should
be able to be checked and filled. You can go with extensions also. Good ones
that won't leak. Truck tire shop..
__________________
07 Meridian 34H 350 Cat
2010 Subaru Forester Tow
Home Port is Kingman,Az
KA7UYZ NRA Endowment Member Retired Fire Service
dnystrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 06:00 AM   #3
Winnebago Owner
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Le Claire, Iowa
Posts: 169
Inside duals usually have an extension that is accessible from the outside. If you do not have the extensions, you can get them and install them yourself. Not that hard to do. They are available from many sources. My coach had them from the factory. Surprised yours did not.
ghutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 06:06 AM   #4
Winnebago Owner
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Le Claire, Iowa
Posts: 169
Follow up...... Tire pressure is something that you will want to check very often, and extensions are vital to doing that easily. You will probably want 8 inch stainless steel with mounting clips. Camping World had them in their resent catalog, or you can Google them for other suppliers.
ghutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 06:21 AM   #5
Winnie-Wise
 
Wizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Home on the hill in Georgia
Posts: 296
Beware extensions from you local auto parts store, most are only rated for 65PSI.
__________________
Jerry & Patsy Potter, Taz & Jake Jr.
2000 Winnebago Journey
2006 Ford Explorer 4X4
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
Wizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 06:51 AM   #6
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,079
Keep in mind the metal valve stems can be rotated allowing the open end to face in any direction. The ones on the inner duals of our 2013 Adventurer were facing outward, but not where I could reach them with a tire gauge. I had to slightly loosen the nut and rotate them so they faced the center of the hole in the outer wheel.

Even then I couldn't get a tire gauge or inflator on them properly because of the smaller hole in the outer aluminum wheel. Rather than add valve stem extensions or change out the stems themselves I modified my Milton 506 inflator gauge to reach through the outer wheel and fit the inner valve stem.

Milton Window Inflator Gage, Dual Head, Model# S-506 | Air Chucks Gauges| Northern Tool + Equipment

Milton also makes a 516 inflator gauge. In our case I needed the forward facing angled foot of the 506 to make contact with the inner valve stem.

Milton Window Inflator Air Gauge — Dual-Head Straight Chuck, 1/4in. Inlet, Model# S-516 | Air Chucks Gauges| Northern Tool + Equipment

I replaced the 6" brass tube between the foot and flexible hose with a 12" piece of 5/16" brake line and a couple adaptors to fit the 1/8" pipe threads. Then I made a slight S bend in the tube to allow it to fit through the wheel and seal against the inner wheel valve stem.

I could have added valve stem extensions or gone the dually route, but it only took about 1/2 an hour to make the modification to the inflator. I don't have to deal with extensions or find a way to support them or the dually stems. Also I have a compressor at home and one in the motorhome so I keep the modified inflator with the motorhome.

As a side note your rear inner duals should be identical to the fronts if you have steel wheels. If you have aluminum outer duals and front wheels the valve stems on the inner duals should be facing the same direction as the ones on your front tires. I'll bet someone at the dealership rotated the rear inner dual valve stems to a position where they could reach them rather than add extensions or modify their gauge.
__________________
Hikerdogs
2013 Adventurer 32H
Hikerdogs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 09:43 AM   #7
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Palisade CO
Posts: 895
I am not a fan of add on extensions. I bought a set of DuallValve solid extended vave stems. The tires have to removed for them to be installed. They come with a rubber stabilizer that fits in the handhold to hold the one coming from the inside dual steady. They make is very easy to check and add air. You can see them here. Dually valve kits for Motor-homes, Busses and 6-wheeled chassis
__________________
Clay WA5NMR - Ex Snowbird - 1 year, Ex Full timer for 11 years - 2004 Winnebago Sightseer 35N Workhorse chassis. Honda Accord toad.
Clay L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 12:24 PM   #8
Winnie-Wise
 
garykk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Southern NM
Posts: 327
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwp48 View Post
I was tinkering around recently on our new-to-us Sightseer 30A. I decided to check the air pressure in the tires. Front tires-no problem. Rear outer tires-no problem. Rear inside tires-Whoa! Where are the darn valve stems? After crawling around a bit I found them...they are on the inside of the inside tires.
My questions are:
Is this common?
Is this safe?
How important is it to change them?
Cost?
At the very least this will be a PIA.
Are you saying that the stems are on the inside of the inner rim so stem is actually facing the axle?
__________________
2014 Phaeton 40 QBH
2015 GMC Sierra SLT 4x4
garykk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 07:47 PM   #9
Winnebago Watcher
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2
Yep!
Inside of the inner wheel rim. You have to crawl under the coach!
rwp48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 11:48 PM   #10
Winnie-Wise
 
SuperGewl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 477
Yep either add valve extenders or have hard line valve extenders installed.
__________________
Retired Navy Submariner
2014 Itasca Sunstar 35F; 5 Star tuned; 2014 Jeep Cherokee TrailHawk
SuperGewl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2014, 09:11 AM   #11
Winnebago Owner
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Le Claire, Iowa
Posts: 169
As a side note your rear inner duals should be identical to the fronts if you have steel wheels. If you have aluminum outer duals and front wheels the valve stems on the inner duals should be facing the same direction as the ones on your front tires. I'll bet someone at the dealership rotated the rear inner dual valve stems to a position where they could reach them rather than add extensions or modify their gauge.
__________________
Hikerdogs
2013 Adventurer 32H


This is my conclusion as well. For some reason, the fronts must have been rotated to the rear. I have always been of the thinking that you rotate the fronts side to side and leave the rears alone unless there is a problem with the rears. All said.... if all the tires appear to have equal ware, I would consider moving the inner duals back to the front, and installing inner valve extensions for the rears.
ghutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2014, 07:38 AM   #12
Winnebago Camper
 
pdq_bc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: where ever we're parked
Posts: 49
anyone using "alligator" caps on their valve stems. got them at les schwab. this way i do not need to remove the cap to check the air pressure.
sure is handy :-)
pdq
__________________
peter & larry... tiffin 2015 allegro 36LA ~ chevy 2009 HHR tow
we're here... http://map.datastormusers.com/user1.cfm?user=12260
our blog... http://wllrtr.tumblr.com
pdq_bc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2014, 09:14 AM   #13
Winnebago Camper
 
JFNM's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Mountain West
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwp48 View Post
After crawling around a bit I found them...they are on the inside of the inside tires.
My questions are:
Is this common?
Is this safe?
How important is it to change them?
Cost?
As a data point to your last question. I recently had my Class A to a good tire shop (Purcell Tire in ABQ). I had them balance all six tires (road force on the front) and replace all valve stems (long solid stems on inner duals and solid angled stems on the outer duals). Cost me $250.00. I was pleased as it eliminated a vibration issue and added some peace of mind.
__________________
JD & Buddy (the ferocious feline) - Full timer out west
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 4023 | 2010 Wrangler (daJeep) | 650 Watts Solar
My Adventures
JFNM is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
View/Navion owners--valve stems David and Fran Winnebago Class C Motorhomes 11 06-16-2016 11:22 AM
Those with screw-on tire pressure sensors and aluminum valve stems John_Canfield Running Gear, Axles, Brakes, Wheels and Tires 7 04-30-2008 04:09 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.