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Old 06-30-2008, 06:02 PM   #1
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1. I've read a variety of forum discussion threads on the operation of basement A/C but, I have not seen a consolidated thread that discusses/provides a "suggested procedure" to start your summer air operations with a "clean" and efficiently operating A/C unit. This thread addresses the cleaning process I performed to "summer ready" my basement A/C in my 2006 Itasca Model 35U. It might provide some suggested cleaning for your similar unit.

Tools Needed: Two hand spray bottles (16 oz suggested). One small shop vac with hose extensions, crevice tool, and small end brush. One drop light. One small slot head stubby screw driver. One garden hose.

Materials Needed: Simple Green Concentrate (diluted-it is non acidic-non corrosive-non toxic, and economical). One gallon jug water (distilled preferred). One new good A/C filter (pleated surfaces - not angel hair).

2. Start the A/C outside coil cleaning with your A/C "OFF" at normal/cool outside/surface air temp, SHORE POWER DISCONNECTED & GEN SET OFF !!. Using the hand spray bottle, with a diluted Simple Green solution (1-2 oz per 10 oz distilled water), starting at the top of the coils..begin spraying the entire coil fin surface. Let the solution set 10-15 minutes. While waiting, crawl under the A/C unit and, with your stubby slot head screwdriver,check the rubber A/C drain valve. Gently insert the screwdriver up into (1-2 inches) the drain valve to free/clear any gunk-crud that might have drained down to/into the valve. With a garden hose..and very gentle stream of regular garden water..totally rinse the cleaning solution from the outside of the coil area... while watching the drain valve drain the rinse solution.

3. Start the A/C inside coil cleaning with your A/C "OFF" at normal/cool inside surface air temp. Locate the inside filter access cover and remove the cover and the installed filter. At this point, you'll need a light source to continue to work the inside A/C coil area inside the sub filter compartment. If available, use a drop-trouble light and drop it down into the sub filter compartment. After you have found the A/C inside coils, using a small shop vac with extension hose and end hairbrush attachment, gently vacuum the coils surface and surrounding areas with a sweeping movement up and down parallel to the coil fins. Do not vacuum across the coils...so as not to damage the coil fins.

4. Continue the A/C inside coil cleaning with your cleaning solution spray bottle. Using the hand spray bottle, with a diluted Simple Green solution (1-2 oz per 10 oz distilled water), starting at the top of the inside coils..begin gently spraying the entire coil area fin surfaces. Let the solution set 10-15 minutes. Again, while waiting, crawl under the A/C unit with your stubby slot head screwdriver and check the rubber A/C drain valve. Gently insert the screwdriver up into the drain valve to free/clear any gunk-crud that might have drained down to/into the valve. Using the second spray bottle filled with distilled water, begin at the top of the coil fins and spray the water to completely saturate/rinse the cleaning solution from the coil fins. Several water refills might be needed to completely rinse the coils. While the rinse solution is draining...again check that the outside drain valve is emptying.


5. When the drain valve has completely stopped draining the rinse, install a good clean filter and the filter access cover. Ready your coach for A/C cooling operation. Start the A/C unit and set to "cool". Let the unit run in cool for 30- 45 minutes. The running of the A/C at this point will have condensation collect on the inside coil and continue the rinse of the coil fins. Watch for the condensation to again begin draining from the drain valve. After 30-45 minutes feel and smell the dripping condensation. If it feels like water and smells fairly free of cleaning solution, you can generally consider the cleaning complete and shutdown the unit.

6. The final A/C system check should be to the overhead outlets. Insure that they are pointed in the direction for maximum cooling of the selected area. Be sure to check that one or more of the overhead outlets is not blowing on or near the area of the A/C's wall thermostat.
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Old 06-30-2008, 06:02 PM   #2
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1. I've read a variety of forum discussion threads on the operation of basement A/C but, I have not seen a consolidated thread that discusses/provides a "suggested procedure" to start your summer air operations with a "clean" and efficiently operating A/C unit. This thread addresses the cleaning process I performed to "summer ready" my basement A/C in my 2006 Itasca Model 35U. It might provide some suggested cleaning for your similar unit.

Tools Needed: Two hand spray bottles (16 oz suggested). One small shop vac with hose extensions, crevice tool, and small end brush. One drop light. One small slot head stubby screw driver. One garden hose.

Materials Needed: Simple Green Concentrate (diluted-it is non acidic-non corrosive-non toxic, and economical). One gallon jug water (distilled preferred). One new good A/C filter (pleated surfaces - not angel hair).

2. Start the A/C outside coil cleaning with your A/C "OFF" at normal/cool outside/surface air temp, SHORE POWER DISCONNECTED & GEN SET OFF !!. Using the hand spray bottle, with a diluted Simple Green solution (1-2 oz per 10 oz distilled water), starting at the top of the coils..begin spraying the entire coil fin surface. Let the solution set 10-15 minutes. While waiting, crawl under the A/C unit and, with your stubby slot head screwdriver,check the rubber A/C drain valve. Gently insert the screwdriver up into (1-2 inches) the drain valve to free/clear any gunk-crud that might have drained down to/into the valve. With a garden hose..and very gentle stream of regular garden water..totally rinse the cleaning solution from the outside of the coil area... while watching the drain valve drain the rinse solution.

3. Start the A/C inside coil cleaning with your A/C "OFF" at normal/cool inside surface air temp. Locate the inside filter access cover and remove the cover and the installed filter. At this point, you'll need a light source to continue to work the inside A/C coil area inside the sub filter compartment. If available, use a drop-trouble light and drop it down into the sub filter compartment. After you have found the A/C inside coils, using a small shop vac with extension hose and end hairbrush attachment, gently vacuum the coils surface and surrounding areas with a sweeping movement up and down parallel to the coil fins. Do not vacuum across the coils...so as not to damage the coil fins.

4. Continue the A/C inside coil cleaning with your cleaning solution spray bottle. Using the hand spray bottle, with a diluted Simple Green solution (1-2 oz per 10 oz distilled water), starting at the top of the inside coils..begin gently spraying the entire coil area fin surfaces. Let the solution set 10-15 minutes. Again, while waiting, crawl under the A/C unit with your stubby slot head screwdriver and check the rubber A/C drain valve. Gently insert the screwdriver up into the drain valve to free/clear any gunk-crud that might have drained down to/into the valve. Using the second spray bottle filled with distilled water, begin at the top of the coil fins and spray the water to completely saturate/rinse the cleaning solution from the coil fins. Several water refills might be needed to completely rinse the coils. While the rinse solution is draining...again check that the outside drain valve is emptying.


5. When the drain valve has completely stopped draining the rinse, install a good clean filter and the filter access cover. Ready your coach for A/C cooling operation. Start the A/C unit and set to "cool". Let the unit run in cool for 30- 45 minutes. The running of the A/C at this point will have condensation collect on the inside coil and continue the rinse of the coil fins. Watch for the condensation to again begin draining from the drain valve. After 30-45 minutes feel and smell the dripping condensation. If it feels like water and smells fairly free of cleaning solution, you can generally consider the cleaning complete and shutdown the unit.

6. The final A/C system check should be to the overhead outlets. Insure that they are pointed in the direction for maximum cooling of the selected area. Be sure to check that one or more of the overhead outlets is not blowing on or near the area of the A/C's wall thermostat.
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Old 06-30-2008, 08:57 PM   #3
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Great write up Pubtym! I am going to bring my MH to the house ands give that a go.
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Old 07-01-2008, 09:53 AM   #4
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Questions.....

1/ When you say, clean the "outside coils", are you talking about the radiator unit at the right rear of the coach covered by the swing up grill?

2/ My "inside" air filters are located, one under the bed, in the floor, and the other in the closet floor, and I don't think I can see anything once the filters are removed. Am I missing something??

I've been wanting to do this for along time so now is a good time.

Thanks,
David
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Old 07-01-2008, 12:04 PM   #5
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Daysu47:
Questions.....

1/ When you say, clean the "outside coils", are you talking about the radiator unit at the right rear of the coach covered by the swing up grill?

2/ My "inside" air filters are located, one under the bed, in the floor, and the other in the closet floor, and I don't think I can see anything once the filters are removed. Am I missing something??

I've been wanting to do this for along time so now is a good time.

Thanks,
David </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

1.Outside coils are as you mentioned right rear...assuming it's a gasser.

2. The under bed one is where the A/C access is on mine. It is usually the closest access point to the inside coil face of the A/C unit. With a droplight or flashlight...look inside the underbed access point..all the way back to the rear end of the coach. ...can you see condenser coils?

3. I do not know what your third one is in the closet floor...but I suspect it is a gas heater forced air return or... access grill to underfloor for shower.

4. If this is first A/C coil cleaning since 2002..I believe you will find them very dirty (especially inside coil surface) and afterward...notice quite an A/C cooling performance.
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Old 07-01-2008, 01:30 PM   #6
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Thanks, I'll look at it tonight. I was informed that my coach had 2 A/C filters as noted. When I found out about the one in the closet I checked it and it was 80% clogged. That was cleaned about a year ago. I usually check them on a regular basis.
We'll see.

Let ya know.

David
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Old 07-01-2008, 02:11 PM   #7
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Daysu47:
Thanks, I'll look at it tonight. I was informed that my coach had 2 A/C filters as noted. When I found out about the one in the closet I checked it and it was 80% clogged. That was cleaned about a year ago. I usually check them on a regular basis.
We'll see.

Let ya know.

David </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

80%...That'll make a difference...I carry spares..buy from Walmart..pleated..no angel hair-fiberglass.
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Old 07-01-2008, 05:22 PM   #8
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This is what the original filter looked like in our Journey before I replaced it:



Now I make sure I check it every few weeks in the summer .
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Old 07-01-2008, 06:12 PM   #9
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Pubtym, checked it tonight and it is the closet floor access to the condenser coils. Not sure what the filter is for under the bed.
I'm too big so the DW will be cleaning that area. Also found allot of shipping peanuts in the bottom. Wonder where they came from???

Outside will be a snap.

Thanks for all the info!

David
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Old 07-02-2008, 05:19 AM   #10
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Daysu47:
Pubtym, checked it tonight and it is the closet floor access to the condenser coils. Not sure what the filter is for under the bed.
I'm too big so the DW will be cleaning that area. Also found allot of shipping peanuts in the bottom. Wonder where they came from???

Outside will be a snap.

Thanks for all the info!

David </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Great. I do not have the size problem...helped me survive Viet Nam flying helicopter gunships...I was the only pilot who could curl up like a bug behind the seat's side armor plate...big guys envied me..

Please let me know what underbed access is when you find time?
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Old 07-02-2008, 05:22 AM   #11
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by boulderado:
This is what the original filter looked like in our Journey before I replaced it:



Now I make sure I check it every few weeks in the summer . </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Zeek...I suspect their are others like this one out there...especially those folks who cook - fry stuff inside with no top fan going...just takes a slight level of grease oil mist-particle flow to increase rate of crud build up on A/C filters..
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Old 07-20-2010, 01:34 AM   #12
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Quote from pubtym: One new good A/C filter (pleated surfaces - not angel hair).

In a different post, which I cannot seem to locate, The poster indicated that he had spoken to the Winnebago basement air conditioner manufacturer several times. He was told that you should not use pleated filters. It was, in fact, stated that you should be able to see your hand through the filter, otherwise do not use it because it is too restrictive. I recall the post because it got me to change out my pleated filter and go with the spun fiberglass type filter. The manufacturer should know what is best for their product. Joe
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Old 07-22-2010, 06:43 PM   #13
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I talked to the AC reps at GNR yesterday and he said that the least restrictive filter the better. Something you could see through was his pick for a filter otherwise you could cause the unit to freeze up and loose efficiency.
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Old 07-24-2010, 07:20 AM   #14
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The filters are a Catch22. The see through gauze like filters will make it so you will have to more regularly clean the coils while the pleated paper ones will clog up more quickly and need to be replaced more often.

With the paper ones I find that I need to replace them after every 7 days of use as they seem to attract any fine dust and dog fur that is at floor level.

Even vacuuming the floors twice a day does not seem to extend the life of the filters.
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Old 07-25-2010, 10:28 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilV View Post
The filters are a Catch22. The see through gauze like filters will make it so you will have to more regularly clean the coils while the pleated paper ones will clog up more quickly and need to be replaced more often.

With the paper ones I find that I need to replace them after every 7 days of use as they seem to attract any fine dust and dog fur that is at floor level.

Even vacuuming the floors twice a day does not seem to extend the life of the filters.
Good golly, folks, the purpose of a filter is to clog from the harmful crud in the air.

The ones that don't clog quickly are NOT filtering. If you compare the pleated filter to the angel hair, you see in the pleated filter the crud which passes through the angel hair and enters your AC/Heating system.

Is it necessary to use a .1 filter in this application? What is the recommended pore size? IOW what was the original filter?
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Old 07-25-2010, 11:03 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamguy View Post
Good golly, folks, the purpose of a filter is to clog from the harmful crud in the air.

The ones that don't clog quickly are NOT filtering. If you compare the pleated filter to the angel hair, you see in the pleated filter the crud which passes through the angel hair and enters your AC/Heating system.

Is it necessary to use a .1 filter in this application? What is the recommended pore size? IOW what was the original filter?
My manual specifically calls for a (this is a quote) "woven fiberglass filter" On a recent post one of the members talked to a rep from Coleman and he said that you should only use a filter that allows you to see your hand through it. The air flow is as important as filtering. I just added a Coleman roof top air conditioner to supplement my basement air when it is over 100 degrees. The unit comes with two filters that I can see my hand through. I assume the manufacturer knows what they are doing. Joe
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:28 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azloafer View Post
My manual specifically calls for a (this is a quote) "woven fiberglass filter" On a recent post one of the members talked to a rep from Coleman and he said that you should only use a filter that allows you to see your hand through it. The air flow is as important as filtering. I just added a Coleman roof top air conditioner to supplement my basement air when it is over 100 degrees. The unit comes with two filters that I can see my hand through. I assume the manufacturer knows what they are doing. Joe
That is what I was saying.
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