Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-15-2009, 08:05 AM   #1
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 12
Rides like a truck

I am a new member with a 2002 Wiknnebago WRG32V Adventurer on a V-10/F53 chasis. It rides like a truck - I know - that's what it is.
BUT, does anyone have a practical solution for the problem, without moving to a larger, diesel powered coach?
I have looked at adding air bags, but unless the springs are softened, it may add stability, but still ride like a truck. I have looked at a system which adds air bags and replaces the leaf springs with less stiff springs. Does anyone have any experience with this problem and do you have any advice??????????
Thanks!!!!!!!!!
Dave Williams
dhwgulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2009, 09:53 AM   #2
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 33
We had a 2000 32V. First thing, check tires for overinflation, believe we used 70 psi. We also switched to Monroe shocks in front which were softer, big help. Other items were Davids trutrack and anti sway shocks by 3T. The tires and shocks made the biggest difference.

N Dienes
nsdienes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2009, 10:09 AM   #3
Winnebago Master
 
RickO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Litchfield Park, Arizona
Posts: 656
I agree that I'd start looking at tire pressure. Weigh the coach and look up the proper tire pressure on the tire mfg website.

The maiden voyage in my new DP was an eye opener and made me think I had bought a bucket of bolts. The tires were inflated to their recommended maximum (for fully loaded coach) of 110 lbs. Once I weighed the coach I learned that the proper inflation should be 85 lbs (+ 5lbs for margin). It made all the difference in the world.
__________________
Rick, Nancy, Peanut & Lola our Westie Dogs & Bailey the Sheltie.

2007 Itasca Ellipse 40FD
RickO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2009, 10:10 AM   #4
Winnebago Master
 
Tom N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Sarver, PA/Crystal River, FL/Shelocta, PA
Posts: 1,196
How much air pressure do you carry in your tires?? Too much air pressure is the primary cause of rough ride.

-Tom
__________________
Sarver, PA/Crystal River, FL/Shelocta, PA FMCA 335149 W3TLN
2005 Suncruiser 38R W24, no chassis mods needed 2013 Honda Accord EX-L 2008 Honda Odyssey EX-L
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
Tom N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2009, 01:21 PM   #5
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 962
I am ..

I am a great believer in:
  • Getting your rig aligned
  • Weighing your rig (fully loaded for an outing) ... and then adjusting the tire inflation to match the table by the tire manufacturer ...
This has done more to improve the handling and ride of my motorhomes than anything else.
skigramp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2009, 09:15 PM   #6
iRV2 Marketing
 
DriVer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Conway, SC
Posts: 886
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhwgulf View Post
BUT, does anyone have a practical solution for the problem, without moving to a larger, diesel powered coach?
Dave, I can only suggest what worked for other owners in your year and make motorhome. After you have ruled out weights, alignment and pressures ..... consider if you will solutions offered by Mor-Ryde.

This company has offered solutions for Ford suspensions for a number of years. The Mor-Ryde is reported to improve on the complaint that you are sharing with us.
DriVer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2009, 01:08 PM   #7
Winnebago Owner
 
kalynzoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Northridge, Ca
Posts: 82
Tires? In a previous MH, when it was time to change the tires, a local tire shop convinced me that I could save substantially purchasing truck tires. The savings were indeed significant. However, at 110 psi I could drive over a dime and call heads or tails. After six months we were almost ready to concede defeat and toss the tires, but a good economy and a chance RV show had us purchase a new rig instead. I will only, and have only, purchase RV specific tires in the future. Currently at 55 to 60mph on a good road the drive is pleasant, comfortable, and smooth. Sadly, many roads in Calif are not good roads, and there is little that can be done to a vehicle to improve the ride on these cracked warped roadways.
kalynzoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2009, 07:03 PM   #8
Winnebago Owner
 
pyoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Palm Coast, FL
Posts: 57
Hello Dave,

Just had my 05 Vista 33' aligned and it made all the difference. Mileage was 15k and it was due. Had traveled for 5 months in 08 and drove up U.S. 95 between Blythe and Needles CA. Went for another 2 month trip in 09 and I could tell the ride was beginning to get rough. Also, the steering wheel was turned left and had to be centered.

Mechanic who did the work stated that all new rigs should be aligned about 12-15K after the break-in period to correct any settling and expansion of new parts. Asked when I should get it aligned again, was told when steering is off center again or tires show excessive wear. He did say that alignment would improve ride and it has.

Hope this helps.

Phil
__________________
07 Winnebago Voyage, Ford Chassis
12 Chevy Malibu
pyoots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2009, 02:03 PM   #9
Winnebago Camper
 
Folis Jones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Suffolk, Virginia
Posts: 20
I keep hearing conflicting advice on tire pressures. The book says one thing and the tire sidewalls say something else. Then the tire shop installer say his own version. What would one use on a 30 ft Winnebago with radial tires?

Folis

Folis Jones
Suffolk, VA
Folis Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2009, 02:54 PM   #10
Winnebago Watcher
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2
Weigh your rig and then use the correct tire chart.
whmprt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2009, 04:07 PM   #11
Winnebago Master
 
RickO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Litchfield Park, Arizona
Posts: 656
Yeah, there's really no short cut. Weigh your rig at least front and back (preferably all four corners) and then go to your tire mfg web site and look up the chart showing the proper cold inflation for the weight the tire is supporting. Then ignor all the conflicting advice.
__________________
Rick, Nancy, Peanut & Lola our Westie Dogs & Bailey the Sheltie.

2007 Itasca Ellipse 40FD
RickO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2009, 04:16 PM   #12
Winnebago Owner
 
pyoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Palm Coast, FL
Posts: 57
Ditto on weighing rig and using correct air pressure based on the Chassis manufacturer's specifications. Opinions are like ear lobes, everyone has a couple, but if you listen to the RV old timers, they'll tell you to use mfg. specs. I learned the hard way and listened to the "tire experts" and upon further research, they turned out to be the guys in the shop holding the broom.

Another good resource is the good folks at Winnebago. They will steer you right.
__________________
07 Winnebago Voyage, Ford Chassis
12 Chevy Malibu
pyoots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2009, 09:44 PM   #13
Winnebago Owner
 
CJ7ole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 208
I have the '02 32v Ford chassis. I run 85 psi and went to the Koni shocks. Big difference.

Hey dwhgulf, are you reading these suggestions? I see nothing since your original post.
__________________
Ole and Anne Anderson, Highland, Michigan
'02 Adventurer 32V, Ford F-53, ours since 4/08,Goodyears, Konis, SeeLevel, CHF
'84 CJ-7 , 5.3 Chevy, 3" lift, 33's, Detroit Locker, Fiberglas tub, winch, hi-lift
CJ7ole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2009, 08:39 AM   #14
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 12
Yep I have read and am reading the posts to this thread.
I have not found anything yet to rejoice about the ride in this machine.
I have tried lowering the tire pressure and changing the shocks and I am considering the MorRide system suggested as well as a Kelderman system to reduce the stiffness in the leaf springs by adding a rubber spring or air bags and a completely different leaf spring. Both of these systems are relatively expensive ($3000 for front and back) and I have not heard from anyone who has tried either of these on the chasis I have. I would like to have some assurance that this fix would be effective before spending that kind of money and still have a rough ride.
dhwgulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2009, 09:48 AM   #15
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 33
dhwgulf

I'm sorry that my previous response go lost in the crowd. Let me repeat. We HAD an f53 v-10 based 2000 Adverturer. It DID ride like a truck. After replacing the OEM frontshocks with the softer Monroe (against all popular advice from non-Adventurer owners) to buy Konis and other expensive shocks, our rig STOPPED riding like a truck. Yes, the ride was softer and slightly "spongy" but our teeth stopped jarring when riding over interstate concrete joints including I10 in LA. Of course, we lowered tire pressure first to a reasonable 70-75 psi.

Nick Dienes
nsdienes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2009, 11:22 AM   #16
Winnebago Owner
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Auburn, CA, Havasu, AZ & Mulege, BCS
Posts: 73
Regarding tire pressure:
Ditto on weighing with a full load as the initial data point needed for getting pressure correct.
Note that actual weight will vary over time, so you'll have to take that into account & consider a somewhat higher tire pressure as the "normal" for your coach. I only weigh by axle cuz I'm lazy and its easy to drive across any commercial scale once and get these numbers (and I can do it for free at some fuel stops if I buy diesel). On the front I divide by two, then add 500# for safety factor. On the back I divide by 4 (duals) and add 500. My batteries are on the right side, and my waste tanks are skewed toward the right; both slides are on the left, so call it approximately even within the safety factor.

Once you know the target load, I'd take a look at chassis and at tire mfgr's pressure recommendations at the same time. Usuall the tire mfgr has a chart giving pressure by load level. Usually the chassis mfgr gives a flat pressure level. Its easy to see what the tire mfgr is saying, but you may need to do some investigation as to the chassis mfgr.

E.g. when Alpine Coaches came with Toyo tires, the chassis mfgr recommended using the Toyo weight table for pressure, or else gave customers a flat figure for front & another for rear based on high end weights that were sometimes seen on Alpines. However, when Alpines went to Goodyear tires, pressure recommendation was suddenly the Goodyear 120psi max pressure all around. Obviously, and confirmed w/a little Q&A, the Alpine mfgr got some "advice" from their legal department. One thing I've learned about lawyers- they know a lot about lawsuits, but are darn near worthless when it comes to the real world or overinflated tires, road noise, hard ride, etc.

So in the end, whether you accept legal advice on your tire pressure or load-&-ride-based advice, is your choice. But I find an informed approach gives me the tools to select a good tire pressure for my needs.
__________________
Baja-tested '08 2-slide 36'
Alpine: The Ultimate DIY'er Project
EngineerMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2009, 12:02 PM   #17
Winnebago Owner
 
Rick Long's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Some Place
Posts: 52
Send a message via Yahoo to Rick Long
I didn't see anyone mention... It rides like a truck because IT IS a TRUCK!!! and someone built a house on top of it!
__________________
1999 Fleetwood Bounder 32H
Many Places Full Time
No Dog * No Cat * No Co-Pilot
Rick Long is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2009, 05:14 AM   #18
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: North East Indiana
Posts: 762
Right on Rick.
Izzyblueye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 07:48 AM   #19
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 12
RICK & HOMER,

I am afraid that you are right - in fact, if you will check my initial querry on this subject, I stated that this chasis is a truck chasis, so what else can be expected. I am motivated to get even a little improvement without making another major investment.

Thanks for your reply.
dhwgulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 08:55 AM   #20
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: North East Indiana
Posts: 762
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhwgulf View Post
RICK & HOMER,

I am afraid that you are right - in fact, if you will check my initial querry on this subject, I stated that this chasis is a truck chasis, so what else can be expected. I am motivated to get even a little improvement without making another major investment.

Thanks for your reply.
With all the above being said. The ride can be improved on, with out spending and arm and leg. A good truck alignment shop can probably offer a lot of reasonable suggestions.
Izzyblueye is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
family log truck ride pawpawboyce Winnebago General Discussions 6 06-07-2011 08:25 AM
Difference between RV Tires and Truck Tires? Dunnpe Running Gear, Axles, Brakes, Wheels and Tires 6 01-15-2008 08:50 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×