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Old 02-29-2020, 03:27 PM   #1
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Hello - new owners of a 1996 Adventurer

Hello all. We are new owners of a 1996 Adventurer. I have all sorts of questions. First being anything we should be aware of? And next, on the roof at the front and rear caps there is what looks like caulking across the seam. Is this an area that leaks?
Thanks
Royce
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Old 03-01-2020, 04:12 AM   #2
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An older unit, you need to be aware of almost everything. As for the seam, its is common on all most all MH to have the front and rear cap seam covered with either a caulk (one made for campers) or a waterproof bonding tape such as eternabond.
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Old 03-01-2020, 09:34 AM   #3
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You might want to check out this thread, which covers the same ground as your question:

https://www.winnieowners.com/forums/...ml#post3855236

You and EverSF should "Friend" each other since you're going to have a lot in common.
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Old 03-01-2020, 05:17 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhyno View Post
Hello all. We are new owners of a 1996 Adventurer. I have all sorts of questions. First being anything we should be aware of? And next, on the roof at the front and rear caps there is what looks like caulking across the seam. Is this an area that leaks?
Thanks
Royce
Royce,
Well, being it's a '96 Adventurer, I'm not sure if that's a gas or a diesel coach. I'm kind-a assuming it's a gas. But, in any case, being that it's new to you, I'd start learning the entire coach, front to back, top to bottom and side to side. That is, learn each and every *system* involved in the operations of it. The water pump system, the charging system(s) of the battery(ies), the heating and air conditioning systems, the propane system(s) i.e. oven, burners, heaters, etc. Make sure all gauges on the dash are functioning appropriately. Make sure the parking brake, if it has one, is functioning appropriately in that it will HOLD THAT COACH at a dead stopped position, at least on a slight grade.

The seams you spoke of, the front and back cap seams, can be troublesome if left un-maintenanced. I myself am not a big fan of putting *tape* all over my roof seams. I get up and inspect all of them. If they look like they're in need of attention, I get out the heat gun and scraper. I heat the offending seam/caulking and, remove it all. Then, I apply a new seam of Dicor, self leveling seam sealer. It's worked for decades so, re-applying it is just what I like. Others may differ.

Being that it's a Winne, it *should* have a fiberglass roof. If it does, the roof-to-cove joint can give you some troubles, again, if it's not maintenanced. I won't go into that kind of maintenance now, ask if you need some.

If it were me, my first order of business would be to make sure that your battery charging system(s) are working properly. I say SYSTEMS because just about all motorhomes made in the last few decades have at least two charging systems. One, from the engine. It's the engines alternator that does all the work. And, just how your engines alternator ties into your house batteries is the primary concern. Tying into the chassis batteries is done by the chassis maker and is normally not any problems. But, it's how they tie your house batteries into your engines charging system that sometimes get's fowled up.

Some on here think every motorhome ever built is built the exact same and has the same components. Well, pretty much nothing can be further from the truth. Winne does it one way and Fleetwood might do it another while, Country coach has their ways and so on and so on. So, it would behoove you to learn just what's involved in your coaches SHORE POWER and engine alternator charging systems.

That way, if you develop any issues, with either set of batteries, you will have armed yourself with a bit of knowledge on how they're SUPPOSED TO WORK which, will also help you analyze potential problems. Most people just buy a motorhome and start using it. But, when their house batteries are DEAD and they've been plugged into shore power for a minimum of at least one full night, they don't have a clue where to start looking. It pays to learn even the basics.

Check the water pump action at all faucets. Make sure the flow is good and the PUMP is working as it should. LEAVE IT ON, but the faucets off, while you're doing things in the coach. This will tell you if you have a leak in the plumbing or, maybe a leaky faucet that can be fixed WHILE AT HOME, and not in a campground someplace miles from home and HOME DEPOT!

Check your furnace(s) and thermostat(s) for proper operation. Make sure they cycle as designed. Test out the oven, if it has one. Test the burners on the stove to make sure they're burning way more BLUE then orange. If you're getting more orange, you might be seeing a potential failing regulator.

Make sure your toilet and its flushing system is working correctly and, is not causing the water pump to cycle 'cause it's not shutting off correctly. Again, some of this can be done while your testing other systems in the coach.

If you have to, get a garden hose and lightly flood above each window and let the water run down over each window all the while, having a person inside to see if there's any leaks. Waaaaaaaaaaay better to take care of these leaks while at home, than in a campground.

Make sure all lighting and switches are working as designed. LED lighting is the hot topic for quite some time. Changing to LED blubs is done by many to relieve stress on the batteries and, create less heat inside the coach.

Look closely at all the ceiling for signs of leaks.

Make sure the engine is properly maintained with oil and filter changes. If in doubt, service it. It's cheap insurance. Check belts, hoses, coolant, battery connections, cables, grounds, etc.

Anyway, enough blabbing for now. It's just a good practice to get into learning as much as you can BEFORE you head out on your first adventure. As stated, the more you can learn how things work, the better equipped you'll be if and when, a problem develops in any of the systems I've mentioned. Good luck and have fun.
Scott
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Old 03-09-2020, 06:57 AM   #5
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Rhyno, congratulations to y'all. The 1996 Winnebago Adventurer has proven to be a good coach.
I discovered, if your engine battery is weak, the transmission will not shift since it has the electric shift. I certainly would not depend on the black and gray tanks level information on the wall. The battery and propane gauges are usually close enough to depend on their reading.
The sealed seams usually last a very long time. But it's wise to keep a check on them.
Lots of fun and enjoyment to you
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Old 03-09-2020, 07:17 AM   #6
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Thank you everyone for all the replies. I gaining a ton of knowledge on this forum. It's like going back to school. Oh no, wait. I am actually paying attention now! Lol
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Old 03-18-2020, 11:52 PM   #7
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Hello all, I too am a newbie to RVing and also purchased a 95 Winnie adventurer wcg34wa.

I love the info I have read so far, it will help me alot.
Just one question..I have the 7.4l/ 454 Chevy and need the spark plugs gap...is it .035 or .045?
Thank you very much
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Old 03-19-2020, 06:12 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrailHappy View Post
Hello all, I too am a newbie to RVing and also purchased a 95 Winnie adventurer wcg34wa.

I love the info I have read so far, it will help me alot.
Just one question..I have the 7.4l/ 454 Chevy and need the spark plugs gap...is it .035 or .045?
Thank you very much
Hi there. The gap should be .035. Keep a good ear tuned to the exhaust manifolds. GM in there great wisdom did alot of these engines with no exhaust manifold gaskets. Just metal to metal and the manifolds can warp. My last experience with this the manifolds were planed and gaskets when reinstalled. I'm an old GM guy.
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:38 PM   #9
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Thanks

Thanks for gap info.
Today was a bad day for me, I noticed delamination on drivers sidewall by window above couch. As well as front end issues ( drivers tire is bald on one side)

Does anyone know what sidewall is made of in 95 adventurer wcg34WA.

Think I bought a lemon...now to learn how to make lemonade
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:50 PM   #10
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Oh dear

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrailHappy View Post
Thanks for gap info.
Today was a bad day for me, I noticed delamination on drivers sidewall by window above couch. As well as front end issues ( drivers tire is bald on one side)

Does anyone know what sidewall is made of in 95 adventurer wcg34WA.

Think I bought a lemon...now to learn how to make lemonade
That is sad to hear. I'm sure the sides are some kind of fiber glass. But as for the front end stuff its basically a big truck. I'm sure there is a cost to getting the chassis in shape but compared to buying a new or newer unit you'll still be money ahead.
We are lucky. We got a gem of a unit. But I have no doubt we will have issues. But for what we paid I can live with that.
So in short, don't give up!
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Old 03-19-2020, 07:59 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Rhyno View Post
That is sad to hear. I'm sure the sides are some kind of fiber glass. But as for the front end stuff its basically a big truck. I'm sure there is a cost to getting the chassis in shape but compared to buying a new or newer unit you'll still be money ahead.
We are lucky. We got a gem of a unit. But I have no doubt we will have issues. But for what we paid I can live with that.
So in short, don't give up!
Thanks��

Overall it is a great MH IMHO.. interior,engine had 39 k miles on it. I think just needs some love and I do love a challenge.
This forum/ community is a God's send as well.
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