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Old 03-26-2020, 01:37 PM   #41
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Thanks Neil V, I was not aware of that Michelin inspection requirement.

Wyatt. I think the comment about putting wood under the tires while in storage has been covered by Tireman9 but in addition, here is a notice taken from P.195 of the Workhorse W Series Chassis Owner Manual: Quote: NOTICE To reduce the potential of flat spots in your tires during storage park the coach with each tire on a 1/2 inch piece of plywood. This will help evenly disperse the load on the tires. Unquote

I have found over the years that concrete/blacktop will wick out oils from the tires. Proof is when you move the unit and there is a black stain left on the cement floor. As mentioned in my original thread, I do all I can to get the 9 to 10 years life from my tires and as I will never drive enough to wear them out.

HappiHenri. Good point about air pressure. I do check the tires more than once per year. I also check all the tires at a rest stop by doing a walk around and thumping with a mallet, same as the commercial drivers.
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Old 03-27-2020, 12:30 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Knightly View Post
Thanks Neil V, I was not aware of that Michelin inspection requirement.

Wyatt. I think the comment about putting wood under the tires while in storage has been covered by Tireman9 but in addition, here is a notice taken from P.195 of the Workhorse W Series Chassis Owner Manual: Quote: NOTICE To reduce the potential of flat spots in your tires during storage park the coach with each tire on a 1/2 inch piece of plywood. This will help evenly disperse the load on the tires. Unquote

I have found over the years that concrete/blacktop will wick out oils from the tires. Proof is when you move the unit and there is a black stain left on the cement floor. As mentioned in my original thread, I do all I can to get the 9 to 10 years life from my tires and as I will never drive enough to wear them out.

HappiHenri. Good point about air pressure. I do check the tires more than once per year. I also check all the tires at a rest stop by doing a walk around and thumping with a mallet, same as the commercial drivers.

I wish I could have a talk with whomever wrote that bit about flat spotting of tires. I don't think they have a clue.
Part of my work as a tire design engineer involved investigating the cause and solution to ride vibration that results from tire flat-spotting. While there are different tire construction features that can affect a tire's response to flat-spotting, it is also true that the CAUSE of a tire to develop a "flat-spot" is the act of parking on a flat surface.


As I previously said parking on wood is to prevent moisture or oils from migrating but a piece of wood is still flat. How parking on a flat piece of wood is going to "evenly disperse the load on the tires" any better or differently than flat concrete or any other road surface is a bit beyond me. Increased air pressure is one way of decreasing flat spotting as the tire tread rubber distorts from round to flat when parked.



Re tire "thumping". Yes it can work if all you want to know is "Is the tire flat" but in controlled testing with commercial drivers about the best they can do is +/- 25 psi. I would recommend you actually measure the tire pressure with a TPMS or at least a hand held gauge. Also tire pressure should be checked at a minimum of once a month and before each travel day.
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Old 03-27-2020, 07:59 PM   #43
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Our Toyo tire are great

We had to replace our cracking Michelin last year. We bought Toyo M154 front and back. No need to have different tire front and back. Suggest searching truck tire shops around you. Look at their rating and reviews. We have a great shop in Columbus Ohio if you decide to drive through.
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:15 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
I wish I could have a talk with whomever wrote that bit about flat spotting of tires. I don't think they have a clue.
Part of my work as a tire design engineer involved investigating the cause and solution to ride vibration that results from tire flat-spotting. While there are different tire construction features that can affect a tire's response to flat-spotting, it is also true that the CAUSE of a tire to develop a "flat-spot" is the act of parking on a flat surface.


As I previously said parking on wood is to prevent moisture or oils from migrating but a piece of wood is still flat. How parking on a flat piece of wood is going to "evenly disperse the load on the tires" any better or differently than flat concrete or any other road surface is a bit beyond me. Increased air pressure is one way of decreasing flat spotting as the tire tread rubber distorts from round to flat when parked.



Re tire "thumping". Yes it can work if all you want to know is "Is the tire flat" but in controlled testing with commercial drivers about the best they can do is +/- 25 psi. I would recommend you actually measure the tire pressure with a TPMS or at least a hand held gauge. Also tire pressure should be checked at a minimum of once a month and before each travel day.
" testing with commercial drivers about the best they can do is +/- 25 psi." Not following you here. Could you be a bit more clear? And, yea. A flat piece of wood does what???
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Old 03-28-2020, 09:49 AM   #45
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Just go Michelin all the way......you'll never worry about tires again for many years and miles
I am sorry to say. This thought and experience is not meeting the test of time. There are many of us RVers who won't spend another dime on a Michelin. No other tire manufacture gives there stores a picture chart of cracked side walls. "These cracks are OK. These are not."
Love my Toyo's. And, if one fails and needs to be replaced when I am stranded the sizes is standard and common. RV sizes often need to be transported from afar, if available in your area or season at all.
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Old 03-28-2020, 10:20 AM   #46
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" testing with commercial drivers about the best they can do is +/- 25 psi." Not following you here. Could you be a bit more clear? And, yea. A flat piece of wood does what???
Thumping the tires by commercial drivers allows them to estimate the tires' pressure within +/- 25 psi.

So if the tire should be at 95psi, it could be at 70psi and the operator giving it a "thump" would "pass" the tire.
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Old 03-28-2020, 03:52 PM   #47
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" testing with commercial drivers about the best they can do is +/- 25 psi." Not following you here. Could you be a bit more clear? And, yea. A flat piece of wood does what???

At a large tire track in W. Texas we would have meetings with groups of commercial truck drivers. Some were "sales" mtg other times they were training sessions. At more than one such meeting we would have a group of HD truck tires set up with different inflation levels. As I recall the control inflation was 95psi i.e. "normal for LR-F 11R22.5 tires that were used. "Test" tires were set at 105, 80, 40 and 25 psi or a similar range of pressures. The drivers were then asked to identify which tires were "properly" inflated.
Almost all drivers selected the 105, 95, or 80 psi tires as being "correct and only the 25 psi was uniformly identified as being low. In the small group (usually 10 drivers), when asked to identify which tire had 95 psi only a few ( two to four) properly identified the 95 psi tire as I recall at the two such meeting I attended while working in Truck Tire design dept.




Flat piece of wood can separate a tire from wet sand or wet dirt. I see no way a flat piece of wood or hard plastic or slab of concrete or brick would prevent a tire from developing a flat spot.
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Old 03-28-2020, 03:56 PM   #48
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Thumping the tires by commercial drivers allows them to estimate the tires' pressure within +/- 25 psi.

So if the tire should be at 95psi, it could be at 70psi and the operator giving it a "thump" would "pass" the tire.

Yes and if the tire needed 95psi driving with 70 would over-heat the tire and could significantly shorten the tire life.
See my posts on Belt Separations and Interply Shear.
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Old 03-29-2020, 09:31 AM   #49
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Thanks theSane &Tireman9. That makes it clear. Much prefer my tire gauge. Even the TPMS sensors have a 3 psi error among them. If it is off a bit, at least the error is consistent.
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Old 03-29-2020, 10:29 AM   #50
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FWIW: My recommendation is to go with replacing all the original tires on a RV with the same quality.

The one significant point not mentioned in this trail comparing "truck tire replacement and methods" is that of the differences in vehicles. Consider, if a semi-truck's trailer (i.e. non steering) blows a tire at speed, very little damage, if any, to the trailer itself will occur. Not so with motorized RVs. A blown tire, again at highway speed, can create havoc with the bodywork/systems on such an RV. You pays your money and take your chances.

Plus, if a tire fails on my automobile, I can usually change it on the side of the road and then proceed. This is not true on a Class A nor most Class C RVs. You normally have to call for roadside service even if you have a spare.

With thought given to those two points, I choose to select quality tires all around our RV.

I've had good results with both Goodyear & Michelin truck tires on our RVs.

To each his own.....

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Some VERY valid points! You have made me very much more aware of potential problems - Thank you.
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Old 03-30-2020, 03:04 PM   #51
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TPMS "Error"
Don't forget the primary purpose of TPMS is to warn of a LOSS of air pressure. I covered how to "TEST" your TPM. You should do this at least once a year just to be sure your sensors and system are still working.
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Old 03-30-2020, 04:53 PM   #52
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Installed Toyo on my front steer tires last summer - they work great! Have since driven from Maine to NC, and then across country - now in CA. Smooth and quiet. 1/2 the price of Michelin. Will buy again for my rear dual tires soon.

Bought Toyo M-154 All- Season Radial Tire 245/75R 22.5
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Old 03-31-2020, 07:11 AM   #53
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Installed Toyo on my front steer tires last summer - they work great! Have since driven from Maine to NC, and then across country - now in CA. Smooth and quiet. 1/2 the price of Michelin. Will buy again for my rear dual tires soon.

Bought Toyo M-154 All- Season Radial Tire 245/75R 22.5


G or H rated? I when I think of all the benefits I got when I put these on my rig. And they are so stable on wet roads.
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Old 04-04-2020, 12:40 AM   #54
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We had to replace our cracking Michelin last year. We bought Toyo M154 front and back. No need to have different tire front and back. Suggest searching truck tire shops around you. Look at their rating and reviews. We have a great shop in Columbus Ohio if you decide to drive through.
Our Michelins cracked also. We also replaced with Toyo M154's. Excellent tire. Did a 3 month, 8000 mile trip last summer with no problems. Tires have about 25000 total problem free miles.
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Old 04-04-2020, 10:36 AM   #55
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I own a semi truck suspension repair and alignment company. We also work on RVs. The Michelin is the best tire out there. With that being said, there are things to consider. How many miles are you actually putting on your rig each year? How are your current tires wearing?

Most RVs do not need a 100,000 mile plus steer tire. That is what the Michelin does for the trucking industry. At the same time, you do not want to put super cheap tires on the steer axle. The cheap tires will wear poorly and become out-of-round quickly. That will cause vibrations in the front end that you do not want to deal with. I would endorse the TOYO steer tires. My wife and I owned 2 semis over 9 years and I ran the TOYOs on my second semi. They performed well.
I would recommend getting your rig aligned at every steer tire change. It is a good idea for safety sake to have someone look at the suspension. Are both steer tires wearing evenly? If so, you probably do not have any major alignment issues. If not, then you have an issue somewhere. when you get an alignment, they should be checking your suspension components to make sure everything is tight. wheel bearings, tie rod ends, draglink, pitman arm, ect. Even if everything checks out, it will bring peace of mind knowing that everything is tight and safe. If you have any questions, let me know.
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Old 05-26-2020, 10:49 AM   #56
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I just put a set of Hercules tires on my Winnie Vista, haven't put but about 60 miles on them so far but planning a couple of trips in the next few months, I will try to do an update when I have several hundred miles on them..
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Old 05-26-2020, 12:44 PM   #57
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I just put a set of Hercules tires on my Winnie Vista, haven't put but about 60 miles on them so far but planning a couple of trips in the next few months, I will try to do an update when I have several hundred miles on them..
So, I'm guessing you put Semi-Truck tires on the Vista? I looked at Hercules' website and see no RV specific tires. Just Medium Duty Commercial Truck Tires.
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Old 05-29-2020, 10:55 AM   #58
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Michelin Tires

I ordered yesterday 2 new Michelin 235/80R/22.5. XRV. Retail around $546 at several store prices I received. Winnebago WIT price $421. FMCA price. $436. It pays to check prices and use the discounts available. All plus tax, mounting and balance.
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