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Old 01-28-2020, 07:48 AM   #1
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1996 Adventurer tranny problem

Hello,
I just bought a vintage 1996 Adventurer. When I was driving the transmission made a hard downshift. And sometimes it slipped when I start moving. Is it repairable?
Thank for you help!
Jimi
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Old 01-28-2020, 07:59 AM   #2
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Yes! But the bigger question may be how much you want to invest in an older unit. Transmission problems tend to cost bigger bucks.
It varies place to place, so I would suggest having some local folks do an estimate. Possible swapping in a used tran is worth it, possibly not.
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Old 01-28-2020, 08:25 AM   #3
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Thanks, for the info!
I paid $8K for it so if I get a rebuilt or used tranny it will be ok.
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Old 02-02-2020, 06:09 PM   #4
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Service

You donít mention any previous service. Therefore I would start with dropping the transmission oil pan and changing the filter. Look for debris or things that donít belong there. On some models you can drain the torque converter and get a more complete fluid change. If you donít want to do that a competent mechanic should be able to do it for you. Trannys are typically pretty neglected when it comes to service. This should cost less than $100 for materials.
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Old 02-02-2020, 09:06 PM   #5
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Assuming that you have a GM chassis and a 4L80E transmission a rebuilt unit can be had under $2000.00, installed should be around 3K.
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Old 02-02-2020, 09:42 PM   #6
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On an older coach like that before driving it one would want to bring transmission service up to date and change out the transmissions oil and filter which may potentially be 24 years old. If its on the P30 chassis you would also want to be sure that the front airbags and independent front suspension along with the front wheel bearing are in good shape.

Brakes and cooling systems should also be flushed and even if the brake pads are in good condition the caliper mounts and guides should all be cleaned and lubricated with a high quality brake grease.

That coach will also likely have the auto-park system which has an electrically activate brake master cylinder hidden underneath the coach which will also need to be checked and have its brake fluid changed along with the brake cylinder that activates the drum brake mounted on the end of the transmission where the driveshaft connects checked for leaks and adjustment. Many over the years have experience issues with the auto-park not releasing 100% causing drag and heating up the tail of the transmission along with at times fully locking them up on the highway so while its out of sight you do need to be aware of it and keep it in good order.

You would likely also want to ensure that the gear oil in the differential is changed.

On that series of coach Winnebago had an issue with the rear cross member inside the basement compartment cracking where it sat on top of the chassis frame rails. This should be checked out from inside the rear basement compartments inspecting for cracks at the top of the corrugated steel member. You may notice a small hump developing in the floor when passing into the rear bedroom or just notice a creak in the floor as you walk past that frame members location.
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Old 02-04-2020, 07:10 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 71_340 View Post
Assuming that you have a GM chassis and a 4L80E transmission a rebuilt unit can be had under $2000.00, installed should be around 3K.
Ouch
Thanks
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Old 02-04-2020, 07:16 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilV View Post
On an older coach like that before driving it one would want to bring transmission service up to date and change out the transmissions oil and filter which may potentially be 24 years old. If its on the P30 chassis you would also want to be sure that the front airbags and independent front suspension along with the front wheel bearing are in good shape.

Brakes and cooling systems should also be flushed and even if the brake pads are in good condition the caliper mounts and guides should all be cleaned and lubricated with a high quality brake grease.

That coach will also likely have the auto-park system which has an electrically activate brake master cylinder hidden underneath the coach which will also need to be checked and have its brake fluid changed along with the brake cylinder that activates the drum brake mounted on the end of the transmission where the driveshaft connects checked for leaks and adjustment. Many over the years have experience issues with the auto-park not releasing 100% causing drag and heating up the tail of the transmission along with at times fully locking them up on the highway so while its out of sight you do need to be aware of it and keep it in good order.

You would likely also want to ensure that the gear oil in the differential is changed.

On that series of coach Winnebago had an issue with the rear cross member inside the basement compartment cracking where it sat on top of the chassis frame rails. This should be checked out from inside the rear basement compartments inspecting for cracks at the top of the corrugated steel member. You may notice a small hump developing in the floor when passing into the rear bedroom or just notice a creak in the floor as you walk past that frame members location.
Thanks for the heads up, I'll definitely address these items ASAP.
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Old 02-04-2020, 07:28 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by 1Ericcoppock View Post
You donít mention any previous service. Therefore I would start with dropping the transmission oil pan and changing the filter. Look for debris or things that donít belong there. On some models you can drain the torque converter and get a more complete fluid change. If you donít want to do that a competent mechanic should be able to do it for you. Trannys are typically pretty neglected when it comes to service. This should cost less than $100 for materials.
After I noticed a slight slip starting off I checked the fluid level and found it to be at the correct mark for a hot tranny with the engine running. The color of the fluid was very dark, not the pink I expected. Time for the fluid and filter to be changed and see how it goes.
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Old 02-04-2020, 08:06 AM   #10
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Always the best way to go! Since you have it, taking a few of the smaller steps and then see how it goes is always better but keeping in mind collecting info on what the worst next steps might be, before doing the current things. At some point one may want to give up or it may be as simple as much of it works out when fluids, etc. are changed.
One item that is easy to overlook is how we often find motorhomes set for long periods between long drives and the things we can't see can get to us. Wheel cylinders which are not used for months at a time will tend to collect rust inside them more than if they are used like our cars. So if you get rust in the wheel cylinders and then jump up for a long trip, it is easy for that rust to score the inside of the cylinders so badly that they have to be replaced. Just another thing to think about having checked. Best of luck with the old girl.
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Old 02-09-2020, 11:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yojimi View Post
After I noticed a slight slip starting off I checked the fluid level and found it to be at the correct mark for a hot tranny with the engine running. The color of the fluid was very dark, not the pink I expected. Time for the fluid and filter to be changed and see how it goes.
Get ready for a rebuild. Full fluid, dark color and any slippage means the clutches and bands are burned and need replacing.
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