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Old 11-23-2020, 05:28 PM   #1
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Beginner questions - Solar boondocking a micro minnie

Hello everyone, I'm a couple months out from buying a travel trailer and am just in the starting stages of planning out a solar / generator setup for it. I work remotely and have been wanting to have a travel setup I can work out of. I've been spending a couple months buying overpriced things for my truck to make it livable, and then realized that not having a bathroom reduces you to the whole...bucket situation, and I just dont think I love freedom that much to want to use that. Decided to switch gears and get a small travel trailer that has a decent bathroom/shower. I'm very new to the travel trailer work so leaning towards name brand I know that has good owner reviews.

Right now I'm eyeing the Winnebago Micro Minnie 2100BH, with thoughts of removing the bottom bunk and installing anywhere from 12v 200ah-400ah of lifepo4 to keep it inside the insulated trailer, and having the whole 12V and 110ac systems of the trailer run off of that (with an inverter somewhere in there I believe). I'm buying it with the sole idea to be 90% away from shore power, but I still need enough power to run things like the fridge, and keep my macbook charged every day while I work remotely, and plenty of buffer space in between. Also planning on buying a gas generator as a backup plan if its cloudy for long stretches. I dont really plan on needing the AC or the heater, i'd rather just drive somewhere where the temperature is nice, but it would be nice to be able to run it for an hour or so every once in a while.

I'm a complete beginner at this sort of stuff, and would prefer not to burn down anything, so I'm trying to get an idea of what a DIY setup would entail, or if it would be worth the money to just buy the batteries and solar panels and pay someone who knows what they are doing to install everything. The solar panel and battery bank looks within my ability, but I have no idea about the safety of things.

I guess my main question would be, once I have a solar battery bank setup with, how do I go from the inverter feeding off that battery into the trailer systems? It doesnt seem as simple as somehow plugging the trailer directly into the inverter with a common power plug.

Anyway, sorry for the huge wall of text, appreciate any help or experience in the matter.

Also, if you now anyone in the treasure valley area in idaho that does this sort of installation, let me know
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Old 11-23-2020, 06:32 PM   #2
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First, why do you need an inverter. All systems in a new Micro Minnie, except the AC (and don't even think about running this off of an inverter) run on DC. But maybe you have a few small devices that need AC to power their charger like your Macbook so power these with a $50 inverter plugged into a cigarette lighter.

Then you might find that a couple of 100 Ah AGM batteries will supply all of your DC needs with 2,3 or 400 watts of solar panels. Then use a portable Honda generator to fill in for cloudy days.

Solar is fairly easy to install. If you are starting from scratch just fill all available real estate with panels. They are cheap enough.There are lots of youtube videos to show you how.

David
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Old 11-23-2020, 06:39 PM   #3
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Thanks for the info, I really just want it feeding power to the trailer system so the stuff like the electric awning and the LED lighting will work, and the TV for short periods of time. I have no need for the AC, if a place gets too hot I'll just drive further north, and I've slept in my truck bed with the shell and some simple insulation and was happy, I tent to like the cold, I just also want to be able to stand up in an enclosed space . Can always fire up a mr buddy for a few minutes before bed.

Is there a way in these new micro minnies to plug directly into something like a portable power station? I was also thinking maybe just a 1000wh portable station and a few solar panels on the top would be enough for my power needs. Recharge the portable power station with solar (and possible dc to dc charger from my trucks alternator), question is, can the trailer use that power like it was plugged in at a site?
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Old 11-23-2020, 07:38 PM   #4
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Keep researching and learning. It's a complex subject.

You can look at the inverter two ways:

1. A device you plug a cord into when you need limited AC power
2. A device that's wired into your TT's systems like shore power or a generator

Both work - having the inverter wired in is obviously more convenient but treating it like a power receptacle and plugging in only when you need AC power is less expensive to set up.

You'll get the hang of all of this as you research and start to talk to others.
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Old 11-23-2020, 09:52 PM   #5
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dmacd: You sound like you learn fast. So I would suggest you search YouTube and then find some schematics to look at.

A picture is worth a 1000 words and LiFeO4 is just now becoming more affordable, but it is still expensive and I myself is struggling with how to build a LiFeO4 200AH system for less than $2,000.

Then you will find you need at least 400W of solar (4 panels at 100W each) as a minimum; and that will take up most of your roof surface area. However, to live truly off-grid I think you will need 800W+ and I don't know if you have room on your roof; and yes you need a generator. (One people cannot steel.)

...I'm not the mountain man you need to talk to about this sort of thing, so I will leave you with these parting thoughts: Most of us Nomads follow the seasons, which means we head south during the colder months and north in the summer hot months. This is because all RVs are not very well insulated.

The diagram below is very basic and you can modify it to suit your needs. You might also go to https://www.victronenergy.com/inverters-chargers for ideas and to Xantrex | Power Inverter, Inverter Charger, Battery Charger Manufacturer for LiFeO4 ideas and then build your solar system using cheaper components.

Victron uses a phone app you will like; and when you look for an inverter/charger you may want to get one with an internal transfer switch so you an plug into shore power automatically with out causing power conflicts inside your RV.

Or this $180 Victron 25A charger only approach maybe ideal to add to the diagram below if you go with a PSW-inverter (only) setup on the cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/Victron-Blue-...6190694&sr=8-2

Building a system with separates is okay too. Just be sure you understand how to wire and use your inverter properly so you don't start a fire.
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Old 11-24-2020, 07:45 AM   #6
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I don't think the "portable power station" aka "solar generator" is necessarily a good idea for this application. I think you'd be far better off with some solar panels and good battery bank. From what I've read, they're really intended for someone who needs truly portable power for numerous applications. Basically they're a battery and inverter and need to be charged via a solar panel (not included), generator, or shore power. I don't see any advantage over having some good batteries in your trailer (much cheaper).

Their quality varies greatly. I suggest you check out some of Will Prowse's videos on them. Some are well made while others aren't.

From your description, it sounds like you'll be a conservative power user. We came from a sailboating background and camped for years, first with 100W of solar and then with 200W of solar, two 6v golf cart batteries in series and a Honda 2000i generator (used mainly to run the microwave). Plan your roof installation so you can add panels at a later date should you need more. Renogy makes a 100W panel that's only about 19" wide that's selling for about $97 that can fit in places other panels can't:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

You might think about a mix of rooftop panels and a portable panel since shady campsites are nice for people but not for solar. I wouldn't recommend LiFePO4 batteries right of the bat. Despite their advantages, they're still very expensive. I'd start with either golf cart batteries or true deep cycle 12V batteries. Just make sure that whatever batteries you get are "true deep cycle", not "RV/Marine Deep Cycle) which are compromise deep cycle/starting batteries. Any battery with Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) in its specs isn't a true deep cycle battery.

Here's a link to one of Will Prowse's many solar generator videos:

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Old 11-24-2020, 09:53 PM   #7
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Thanks for all the replies everyone, and imnprsd for the diagram, thats actually what I'm going to go with. All the systems I want to work while boon docking are on the 12V system, so I'm just going to beef up the existing battery bank with a 200-300ah lifepo4 bank, however much solar I can fit on the roof, and put a lifepo4 charger inbetween a solar controller and call it good, just use all the existing wiring as much as possible. I'll also be buying a 2000w generator as backup for everything, but in reality, if the LED lights and awning works, and I can run my WeBoost and laptop from a couple plugs running from an inverter, I'm good.

As far as the pricing goes, I've fortunate enough to have been able to keep my job through this pandemic, and I'm fine with spending the premium on getting lifepo4, especially if I"m willing to wait for Hong Kong shipping from a reputable seller. If not only for the weight savings for moving it about. I think 200ah of useable AGM is over 200lbs?

I've also basically decided on the Micro Minnie 2100BH, lots of brands out there, but none with this setup and size that also comes with dual axle. think I'm going to remove the bottom bunk and store the batteries there out of the elements. Might change my mind when I look at a 2106FBS or 2018FBS, might like that bed orientation more than the extra storage space.

Just waiting on a couple large items in my life to sell and I'm probably gonna pick one up before the season gets started next spring. Will probably be posting here more
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Old 11-24-2020, 10:44 PM   #8
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You are welcome.

FYI, that power grid drawing was made by someone else on IRV2.com so they deserve the kudos!

Please keep us posted after you finish your project and if you have a chance to diagram it that would be great!

In my 40' DP-RV, I have 4-6V-GC2-Golf Cart Batteries (420AH) but I'm supposed to only use 50% of that (210AH) between charges; and I have a traditional Class A type inverter setup with a quaizi-sine wave 2000W Dimensions brand inverter.

Note: I would not think you need a "low frequency" inverter unless you run heavy loads for long periods of time or you need to start a large motor. Otherwise, people seem to be using "high frequency" PSW inverters on the cheap, but they hedge their bets buy using much larger inverters than they need.

The problem with large inverters is that they take more power to run; and when every 10AH is important -- your really should add up your energy needs and then buy a PSW inverter that will work for you. And low frequency inverters are more expensive, heavier, and more industrial, but I would always buy a low frequency inverter over a high frequency type; just like PSW inverters are more desirable than MSW inverters.

And don't forget to mount a fuse as close to your batteries as possible for safety reasons!

HOW DO I PLAN TO ADD MORE AMP-HOURS OF BATTERY STORAGE TO MY RIG?

I am leaning towards building a separate 12 or 24V LiFeO4 power grid (I will Call P2) that has 2-3 large 175W solar panels in the 350-525W range, but I will keep this system completely separate from my OEM-RV-Power grid... and I will only use it to power my 16cu-ft residential refrigerator and 1 outlet for my computer. Why?

Answer: I want more battery storage. I would prefer to run my residential refrigerator off a PSW inverter. I don't want to through my old 2000W Dimension quisi-sine inverter away or spend the money to replace it. And I think building a separate LiFeO4 power grid is cheaper and upgrading what I have.

I also figure about 50% of my battery power is used to power just the refrigerator; so by disconnecting my frig from P1 grid, and then connecting the frig to just the 200AH-LiFeO4 power grid (P2), then that will be like doubling my amp-hours of storage for about $1500-$1800. (TBD) I have not done it yet.

And when I have shore power or generator power (thanks to using a automatic transfer switch-ATS) then I will have effectively enlarged my existing power grid (P1) substantially without throwing away any components. ....And this approach is also a lot cheaper than modifying my P1 grid to accept Lithium.

So, if I go this route, my P2 lithium power grid will probably look a lot like yours. So please let us know where you source your parts and where the deals are?

FYI: LiFeo4 battery banks do NOT outgas so you can burry these in your basement. And Lithium batteries...

* Weigh 40% less than lead acid batteries
* Charge much faster than lead acid
* And many come with built-in BMS-Battery Management System so you definitely should get type.

You will also want to charge your LiFeO4 bank off your alternator and most people are accomplishing this with a DC-DC Converter, but I think you can also use a VSR like this one from KeyLine.

Note: I use this Keyline VSR to charge my lead acid house batteries from my engine batteries -- and this setup has worked very well for me for over 4 years.

I also contacted Keyline and asked them if I can use their VSR to charge my LiFeO4 battery bank and they said yes. However, I have to wonder? So I will definitely check the amps if I use my existing Keyline and connect it to a lithium battery bank; and I will touch the alternator after a while to make sure it's not getting hot.

KeyLine VSR $83 On Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Dual-Battery-...6279339&sr=8-2

They also have "knockoffs" of this VSR that should work just as well. And these low priced units appeared after the Keyline patent expired and the company did not renew it. But I can only recommend what I have used and that would be the Keyline brand.

The price of PSW inverters and LiFeO4 200AH battery banks are coming down, but so are the advertised number of cycles. And as I see it, your lithium batteries have to last 5+ years to just break even with FLA batteries, but there are a number of advantages.

You also need to know, LiFeO4 batteries do not like to be recharged in sub-32F temperatures. This is why some people put the battery inside the cabin vs. other owners who use a battery pad heater or buy a battery bank with a heater element built-in. So you might look into this subject more.
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Old 11-25-2020, 06:33 AM   #9
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Before spec'ing out any LiFePO4 system, I suggest watching as many of Will Prowse's videos as well. Although only some are RV-specific, there's a lot to learn and he covers a lot of ground. For example, here's a relatively recent video on some lower cost LiFePO4 batteries that he tested:



He also has a forum:

https://diysolarforum.com/members/will-prowse.1/

I've been watching a variety of podcasters on these topics for several months and his videos are well-done, objective and, from comments I've seen in Winnieowners and other RV forums, he is well-regarded. Unlike many, if he gives inaccurate information, he'll retract it and present updated information in a subsequent video.

Good luck. I may go the LiFePO4 route when we start using our MH more but, while it's sitting in storage, I'll stick with my golf cart batteries.

Note: One of the batteries Will tested will charge in low temperatures and I read where Battle Born has also dealt with this issue:

https://www.rvnews.com/battle-born-b...eated-battery/
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Old 11-25-2020, 02:00 PM   #10
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My late model 2108DS came wired for solar so it's just a plug in from the solar panel. When you shop look for that. I have a 200watt suitcase panel and had the dealer add another lead acid battery, two will fit on the frame behind the propane tanks. I have two 30lb tanks versus the normal 20lb. I use a 4500watt generator and only take it when I need AC, its quiet run, weighs 104lbs and is over-kill for my needs. It often stays behind especially in cooler months. The TV runs on AC power so I bought 250w Li-ion battery pack that charges on AC or solar for this I use a 60w panel it will also charge from your vehicle charging port. This is all real simple stuff and I primarily boondock in Nat Forest I can go for weeks just have to watch the black/grey water tanks.
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Old 11-25-2020, 07:06 PM   #11
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To build on BobC's idea above, I was at Costco today and found this portable "all in one" device for $500. (Weighs about 60 lbs.)

* 1200W inverter with 4 110Vac output sockets

* About 60AH of 12V battery storage equivalence (1600W hours AC)

* Built-in solar controller that can handle up to ??? Watts. (Maybe 400W? IDK)

* And you can connect a battery to it for more storage. (That's what those red and black battery post screws are for.)

* AC input for charging, but I don't know how many charging amps are being used. (Probably not that important since it's just a 60AH-Lithium Battery inside? (IDK)

* Display to monitor SOC, plus Voltage In & Voltage Out... And maybe some other things.

This type of portable system may work out well for everything you want to power except for a mini-frig, but it may work okay for that too? IDK

...But it seems to do a lot of things for $500 and it has all the protection circuity built in. And then you can an aux. lithium battery for more storage.

I'm not recommending it, because I have not tried it, but it maybe something you try and if you don't like it you can always return it to Costco within 90 days I think.
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Old 11-25-2020, 09:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmacd View Post
Hello everyone, I'm a couple months out from buying a travel trailer [...]Right now I'm eyeing the Winnebago Micro Minnie 2100BH, with thoughts of removing the bottom bunk and installing anywhere from 12v 200ah-400ah of lifepo4 to keep it inside the insulated trailer
One thing very important not to miss is that if you plan to run off battery you must get a trailer that has an absorption refrigerator. That is, the refrigerator can run off propane as well as 120v. Late model trailers now have 12v refrigerators which will quickly run down all those big batteries in a few hours. I believe the propane fridge is an option that doesn't cost extra.

Very few things in the trailer need 120v A/C as has already been said in this discussion. I'd get a little inverter for the couple things you may want to run (laptop, tv, cpap?, etc). 12v and propane will run everything else. And note for some (perhaps all) of these things, you may be able to find a 12v power brick that will run a bit more efficient than using an inverter + 120v brick. Perhaps the toughest thing is if you need to have a drip coffeemaker. Find another way to make the coffee using the stove .
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Old 11-25-2020, 09:31 PM   #13
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The Duracell above has a 55Ah battery for about 660 Wh's of DC, and assuming 85%-90% inverter efficiency, less than 600Wh's of AC power. Also, unlike most of the other competitors, it uses a Sealed Lead Acid (SLA) battery, not lithium. This means it will take all day to charge, even if you can plug it in, and you probably won't get enough sunlight in a day to fully charge it. Also, the battery will only last about 500 charge cycles. And it's Modified Sine Wave, vs Pure Sine Wave. Still, probably fine for a few hours of TV with enough extra for charging phones, flashlights and other devices. But you STILL need to upgrade your trailer battery if you want to boondock, as the portable device will not run your other loads.

Portable devices are great if you really need portability. But if you can install a 200Ah + fixed system with solar, you would have the extra capacity you need to run heat, fridge, fans, maybe even use some small appliances, as well as get through a cloudy day or two without having to run the genny too much.

Just remember, it takes a lot of solar to recharge 200Ahs. Probably 400-500 watts depending on time of year, clouds, panel shading, etc. Many people run the genny for a hour or two in the morning and/or evening to supplement when solar can't keep up. Others just adjust their power consumption. You can start out with less, but getting a solar charge controller that can handle more will avert having to buy another when you want to add panels.

When you buy an inverter, you have to chose one that will run the loads you need. If you want to run your microwave without starting a generator, probably 2KW. Your batteries would also have to handle the discharge rate, about 150A for a 2KW inverter. For LiFePO4, that usually means paralleled batteries/cells.

When you are designing your system, you will have to know what your power budget is for your particular trailer. New Micro Minis are coming from the factory with 12V fridges, so you need battery capacity to keep your food cold/frozen. They also scrapped the propane oven and upgraded to a microwave/convection oven, so no heating food in the oven unless you budget for the power (or start up the genny). Add in lighting, heat, laptop, coffee maker, phone, audio devices, various other rechargeable devices, fans, and parasitic loads.

In the end, it's a big investment, and you litterally have to live with it. Take your time.
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Old 11-25-2020, 10:28 PM   #14
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Sorry for suggesting that Duracell All In One Brick may do the trick if it has a lead acid battery. I just assumed it came with lithium. So forget that idea!

OldNavy: You said: When you buy an inverter, you have to chose one that will run the loads you need. If you want to run your microwave without starting a generator, probably 2KW. Your batteries would also have to handle the discharge rate, about 150A for a 2KW inverter.

Can you help me understand what you mean by "discharge rate"? ...I think you are referring to the AC amps being used x 10? I.e., the inverter and cabling has to handle 150A which is about 2000W/120x10x.9=150A.

I think I have that right. And while this power management stuff can be confusing, I usually prefer to think of all power drains (AC appliances) in terms of Amps based on my 12V DC power source.

Note: The 0.9 factor in the equation above is the inverter efficiency.

What I am still wondering is why Xantrex seems to be moving more and more towards the high frequency inverter market vs. low frequency. ...But so is everyone else! (See Xantrex Freedom XC with or without a charger built in.)

I'm sure it's due to cost, but maybe there are some new design tricks that have only hit the market in the last couple years? ...Either that or Xantrex expects the useful life of their high frequency inverters to only last 3-5 years? (Just a guess.)

This implies high frequency inverters typically do NOT last as long as low frequency inverters and are potentially more dangerous (catch fire). Is this true?

To put it another way: Why would any Class A RVer buy a high frequency inverter? Seriously. I'm looking at buying a new PSW inverter and I'm not sure if I should buy the Xantrex 3000W-PSW-Freedom XC or buy a used 2000W Dimensions Low Frequency PSW inverter?

I presume the Freedom XC is a high freq. inverter based on its price. Is it?

...What am I missing, because 90% of all the inverters on the market seem to be of the high frequency type. So I am confused. Usually a manufacture makes a product to meet the needs of the consumer. But maybe not in this case because the buying public does not know to insist on low frequency inverters? ...Or maybe I'm just a dinosaur and I'm not keeping up with the times?

For my power needs I know a 2000W-MSW inverter is really all I need, because that is what I have now. But I want to upgrade to a PSW inverter.

So... if I buy a high freq. inverter do I need to buy a bigger one... to add additional "headroom" for safe operation? I.e., for my application where a 2000W low freq. inverter is all I need, would you recommend a 3000W or 4000W high freq. inverter for reliability and safety reasons, or can I get away with a 2000-PSW-High Freq. inverter?

...And yes, I have a 16 cu-ft residential refrigerator and I want to run my microwave.
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Old 11-26-2020, 01:31 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by imnprsd View Post
Sorry for suggesting that Duracell All In One Brick may do the trick if it has a lead acid battery. I just assumed it came with lithium. So forget that idea!

OldNavy: You said: When you buy an inverter, you have to chose one that will run the loads you need. If you want to run your microwave without starting a generator, probably 2KW. Your batteries would also have to handle the discharge rate, about 150A for a 2KW inverter.

Can you help me understand what you mean by "discharge rate"? ...I think you are referring to the AC amps being used x 10? I.e., the inverter and cabling has to handle 150A which is about 2000W/120x10x.9=150A.

Batteries are limited in how much current they can supply, by chemistry, design and heat. With LiFePO4, their discharge rate is limited by a Battery Management Sytem. Many 100Ah LFP batteries are limited to 50 or 100 Amps, so running two in parallel allows you to double the maximum current.

I was speaking in general terms, estimating how many DC Amps would be required to run a microwave. When calculating loads, watts are watts, DC or AC. But there are losses in the conversion. So if your microwave draws 1,500 watts, your battery has to provide 1,500 watts + conversion losses. So at 90% efficiency, the battery has to supply about 1,500 X 1.1, or 1,665W to the inverter, or about 130 Amps at 12.7V. A full AC load on a 2,000 watt inverter could take 175 DC Amps. These are round numbers using pretty general assumptions of battery voltage and inverter efficiency.


I think I have that right. And while this power management stuff can be confusing, I usually prefer to think of all power drains (AC appliances) in terms of Amps based on my 12V DC power source.

Note: The 0.9 factor in the equation above is the inverter efficiency.

What I am still wondering is why Xantrex seems to be moving more and more towards the high frequency inverter market vs. low frequency. ...But so is everyone else! (See Xantrex Freedom XC with or without a charger built in.)

I'm sure it's due to cost, but maybe there are some new design tricks that have only hit the market in the last couple years? ...Either that or Xantrex expects the useful life of their high frequency inverters to only last 3-5 years? (Just a guess.)

This implies high frequency inverters typically do NOT last as long as low frequency inverters and are potentially more dangerous (catch fire). Is this true?

To put it another way: Why would any Class A RVer buy a high frequency inverter? Seriously. I'm looking at buying a new PSW inverter and I'm not sure if I should buy the Xantrex 3000W-PSW-Freedom XC or buy a used 2000W Dimensions Low Frequency PSW inverter?

I presume the Freedom XC is a high freq. inverter based on its price. Is it?

...What am I missing, because 90% of all the inverters on the market seem to be of the high frequency type. So I am confused. Usually a manufacture makes a product to meet the needs of the consumer. But maybe not in this case because the buying public does not know to insist on low frequency inverters? ...Or maybe I'm just a dinosaur and I'm not keeping up with the times?

For my power needs I know a 2000W-MSW inverter is really all I need, because that is what I have now. But I want to upgrade to a PSW inverter.

So... if I buy a high freq. inverter do I need to buy a bigger one... to add additional "headroom" for safe operation? I.e., for my application where a 2000W low freq. inverter is all I need, would you recommend a 3000W or 4000W high freq. inverter for reliability and safety reasons, or can I get away with a 2000-PSW-High Freq. inverter?

I can't really speak to the reliability of newer HF inverters. They are cheaper, lighter weight and usually more efficient. They lack the large and heavy transformers of LF models and don't handle extended surges, like motor starts that exceed their rating, as well as old school LF inverters. So I wouldn't rely on the "surge" capability much. That said, I would think a brand like XANTREX would be well engineered and reliable, and an inverter that runs 24/7 would benefit from the increased efficiency of the HF model.

...And yes, I have a 16 cu-ft residential refrigerator and I want to run my microwave.
See highlighted text above.
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Old 11-26-2020, 12:44 PM   #16
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Thanks for all the suggestions everyone, I think my plan now is to pick up a 2100BH thats solar ready and reuse the wiring and swap out the stock solar controller when I put solar on the roof. I think I can fit three 200 watt panels on the roof, maybe more, so anywhere from 400-700 watts on the roof, and I'm going to replace the stock battery with a 300ah lifepo4, as well as run a dc-dc charger from my truck (I already have this setup in my truck running the renogy DC-DC/Solar charger), and as an emergency backup, I'll just grab a 2000w generator.

Like I mentioned above, my power needs are very low. I'm a 30 year old single guy and thanks to the pandemic, I've gotten used not showering days at a time anyway I'm just shooting for a setup that lets me stay out in the boonies until I run out of food or tank space. I prefer to make food outside to not make the trailer smell like stir fry for a few days, so mostly be using my coleman stove.

So for Micro Minnies, I know for sure to get one that has the fridge that runs on propane and electric, but I'm confused about all the different packages I see online for these, and Winnebago doesnt seem to have any info. I know I want the explorer package with the 15" ATs and the lift, and I know theres another package out there that keeps your tanks heated (the comfort package?). Does anyone have a list of what packages are available or should I just call a dealership?

And one other question as an aside. Anyone have any experience with WeBoost, specifically the RV65 version? Looks enticing because of the telescopic pole. If I can get 2-3mbps 4g thats enough for my daily conference calls, thats all I need.
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Old 11-26-2020, 02:28 PM   #17
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Thanks for all the suggestions everyone, I think my plan now is to pick up a 2100BH thats solar ready and reuse the wiring and swap out the stock solar controller when I put solar on the roof.
"Swap out the stock solar controller"... does the Solar READY 2100BH come with a solar controller? That doesn't sound correct.

Also, the Solar READY designation usually means a ZAMP style single Solar Port on the side of the RV - not on the roof.

Please correct me if I've got this wrong - but my memory is that this is what others that bought that option have said.
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Old 11-26-2020, 02:57 PM   #18
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"Swap out the stock solar controller"... does the Solar READY 2100BH come with a solar controller? That doesn't sound correct.

Also, the Solar READY designation usually means a ZAMP style single Solar Port on the side of the RV - not on the roof.

Please correct me if I've got this wrong - but my memory is that this is what others that bought that option have said.
Yeah thats why I'm trying to figure out, I asked my local RV dealership for some brochures on the packages, if thats the case, i wont worry about it. I only mentioned that because some of the ads I've seen for new MMs have a 10A solar charger built in, might not be from factory though?

How hard is it to drill a hole through the roof on one of these things? Just a matter of a drill bit and some rubber gaskets? I wouldn't mind doing it myself, I have a buddy whos a natural hand at all this stuff so its just as easy for me to run some wire through the roof while I'm up there installing the panels.
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Old 11-26-2020, 03:59 PM   #19
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Neither the Solar Ready nor those with 10w systems have a solar charge controller.

With the WBGO Travel Trailers there is a single Zamp SAE solar connection on the side of the RV or in a lower compartment. It's wired directly to the batteries. To use it you need to buy a portable solar "suitcase" with a built in charge controller. Then you just plug that into the solar port.

I've seen the 10w panels only on mid-2000's motor homes and those are glorified trickle chargers that are not really good for much of anything. Nor are those upgradeable. And they have so little power they don't need a controller.

Drilling a hole in the roof isn't difficult, but it takes plenty of planning and care to make the hole where it won't hit anything structural or any wires. And, you don't use grommets, they make all kinds of roof cable covers. Here's one but there are many other kinds:
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Old 11-26-2020, 05:13 PM   #20
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It sounds as if you are going to swap out a single lead acid battery for a lithium battery. My concern would be if you were going to get four or more batteries; if you were to load them on a single side of the TT it might cause an imbalance and overload of one side's tires.

I may have missed the discussion on this, but you may need to replace the converter you have with one that can handle the charging requirements for a lithium battery. I do not believe the standard WFCO unit can accommodate lithium.
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