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Old 12-08-2019, 12:55 PM   #1
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Winnebago View 24D

This thread is really only for those people who have owned and/or used a Winnebago View/Navion 24D with the Murphy bed.

We presently have a Minnie Winnie 22R with a corner bed built on a Ford E350 chassis and the 5.4L engine. We do not like the bed and find the RV underpowered for driving in much of the west and the house seating is not very comfortable to us.

So we are looking for a replacement. For a variety of reasons Class As, Super Cs and anything over 27 feet is out of play for us. We are keeping a 32ft 5th wheeler for some types of trips. This unit needs to be much shorter rig than the 5th for going to other kinds of places.

We are looking very hard at the View 24D with the Murphy bed configuration. My questions are:

1) What are your overall impressions and experiences with it?
2) What are the best three points?
3) What are the worst three points?
4) How easy do you find the Murphy bed to use day to day?
5) What is your typical mpg?
6) How good is it on serious grades, up and down?
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Old 12-08-2019, 06:02 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
This thread is really only for those people who have owned and/or used a Winnebago View/Navion 24D with the Murphy bed.

We presently have a Minnie Winnie 22R with a corner bed built on a Ford E350 chassis and the 5.4L engine. We do not like the bed and find the RV underpowered for driving in much of the west and the house seating is not very comfortable to us.

So we are looking for a replacement. For a variety of reasons Class As, Super Cs and anything over 27 feet is out of play for us. We are keeping a 32ft 5th wheeler for some types of trips. This unit needs to be much shorter rig than the 5th for going to other kinds of places.

We are looking very hard at the View 24D with the Murphy bed configuration. My questions are:

1) What are your overall impressions and experiences with it?
2) What are the best three points?
3) What are the worst three points?
4) How easy do you find the Murphy bed to use day to day?
5) What is your typical mpg?
6) How good is it on serious grades, up and down?
OK, I have the Navion 24V, not quite the same layout, but the chassis questions should be universal answers.

1) 24D unknown, but my 24V is our favorite of the 3 types of motorhomes we've owned - it has the maneuverability and handling and fuel economy of the Roadtrek, combined with most of the amenities of the larger Sunstar, both of which we've also owned.
2) size is just right, performance and fuel economy so far has been flawless, standard and optional equipment selection is better than most.
3) OCCC limitations, diesel technology could be expensive to maintain but occurs less often, my off grid (recharging and battery selection) situation had to be upgraded by me to get it to an acceptable level. The new 2020 models have been vastly improved in that respect.
4) N/A
5) 15mpg when not towing at around 65mph, 13mpg when pulling our Wrangler. These are overall averages, taken over several days of driving, not Scan Gauge II "snapshots" while rolling down a flat smooth freeway on cruise with no winds and no slopes.
6) No problems with the west Texas hill country on I-10 while towing, nor any serious issues in the stretch of I-70 between Denver and Grand Junction, not towing. I don't think it would have been much different pulling the Jeep through there. Down hill grades required more transmission and braking management, than uphills, for me at least.

I know you want 24D folks to chime in, so I'll shut up now.
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Old 12-08-2019, 07:42 PM   #3
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Your response was excellent and thank you for it.

Are you aware of big changes between the 2019 and 2020 models?

How do you find the stability in cross winds and semi passing? In our Minnie I added Hellwig antisway bars that made a day and night improvement in driving. Have you done anything to the suspension system?


Thanks.
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Old 12-08-2019, 08:01 PM   #4
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I own a 24p Vita, on sprinter chassis. So far loving the the easy of parking, driving etc. Ours has the queen on a pull out, which could be cumbersome for on the road, but heck their is always the overhead sleeping area. The room with the slide in is outstanding. You can access everything except the queen bed which is folded over in half.The price point is great, and I am modifying things as I go. I did add the sway bar and sumo springs and it handles well, and ride is great.
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Old 12-08-2019, 08:17 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
Your response was excellent and thank you for it.

Are you aware of big changes between the 2019 and 2020 models?

How do you find the stability in cross winds and semi passing? In our Minnie I added Hellwig antisway bars that made a day and night improvement in driving. Have you done anything to the suspension system?


Thanks.
Yes on 2020 models. They added a lot of the prior year's options as standard equipment and upgraded some of the lame stuff to something useful. The only options I would add are the lithium upgrade, full body paint, and the diesel generator. I added the last 2 options to my 2018 from the factory, and upgraded the batteries to lithium myself. I also added a 3rd Zamp Solar panel.

I personally have no problem with cross winds and bow wash from 18 wheelers. My pet peeve is the curb roll at low speeds. I'm looking at maybe adding Sumo Springs to see if that helps.

If it weren't for that (useless) cab over "forehead" I'd probably order a 2020 Navion. We ordered our 2018 24V and deleted the cab over. We prefer the low profile look and it cut 150 lbs of weight from our unit. We didn't want a space to store junk which is what it would have become. We ordered the rear stabilizer jacks but have yet to use them. I wish we had hydraulic levelers. That's still on the wish list and we'll probably add a Bigfoot system eventually.

OCCC is the Achilles heel of these things and unfortunately the 24D with the larger slide out is probably the heaviest by GVWR of the group. FYI.
Hope this helps.
We love our Navion. It just works for us.
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Old 12-09-2019, 07:26 AM   #6
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We are not R V Motor home experts as this 2019 View 24D is our first motor home RV . We have camped and traveled for years with tag a longs and truck campers . This first year ( October 2018 - October 2019 ) we put 14,000 miles on our new View 24D . So far we like the lay out , ease of maneuvering , setting up and driving the Mercedes Sprinter , power and fuel mileage . We can access the national parks , national forests and state parks that have size restrictions . We do not use the big fancy RV parks / resorts like the big class A do and do not intend on living in the View . Just want to travel and see the country for 3 - 4 weeks at a time . We feel the View meets all of our expectations so far . The murphy bed is perfect . We are comfortable and sleep well . In the morning push the button , raise the bed and sit on the couch , watch TV while breakfast is being prepared with a lot more floor space . We have camped in temps from 18 - 98 degrees and light snows with no problems . Diesel generator is a definite must have . I have added Sumo springs and Helwig sway bar . Both help stabilize the vehicle in cross winds and uneven roads . Made a huge deference . Winnebago should install these anyway . We did not put hydraulic levelers due to weight . Do have stabilizers on the rear of chassis and they are sufficient . Added a Level mate pro and it helps you figure out where to park with sometimes a 2 X 8 board or 2 . Most sites we use nothing . MPG varies on how you drive and the grades you are on . We get as much as 17 mpg and low as 12 -13 mpg . Average over all for our first year and 14,000 miles is 13.7 mpg . We do not tow a vehicle but pull our boat to the lake near here when the grand kids come to visit . Over all we like the View 24D . But it is a camper ( tiny house on wheels ) and not our home . I guess we would buy it again to do what we like doing and seeing the parks , beaches and mountains . We are having fun on it and look forward to 2020 with some big plans for Alaska and Canada as long as our health and energy lasts we will keep it rolling .

If you have any specific questions I will be happy to help .
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Old 12-09-2019, 09:02 AM   #7
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Anyone who has owned both the older chassis and the new chassis ? Wondering how big the difference is in quietness, ride (highway expansion joints), etc...
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Old 12-09-2019, 10:00 AM   #8
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We have owned three View/Navion machines. All bought new. First was a 2006 23H, got it in August of 2005. It had the 5 cylinder diesel. Put about 70,000 on it, towed a Scion xA for a couple of years, then a MINI Cooper Clubman S.

In March of 2012, got a 2012 24G. It had the V6 diesel. Put about 12,000 on it, towed the MINi for a while, then got a Ford Escape.

Jumped up to a Tiffin Breeze diesel pusher in the spring of 2014, then to our current rig, a 2018 View 24D in October of 2017. Still towing the Escape.

So the V6 Mercedes chassis is obviously more powerful, but not gigantically. It is definitely a quieter cab (had to add weather stripping to the 2006 to try to cut down on the wind noise). Our 24G was the quietest (no cab over sleeping). The V6 does a bit better on the hills and the mpg is nearly the same. I like the 2018’s dash displays and steering wheel buttons better than the previous two. We have about 16,000 miles on our 24D so far.

BTW, responded to rarebear’s original questions over on iRV2.
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Old 12-09-2019, 12:36 PM   #9
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Here's one other possible caveat on the larger wall slide of the 24D / Murphy Bed models.
This other owner has had problems with leveling their coach, because of the additional weight and tendency to "lean" to the driver's side with the slide extended. Most likely because the 3500 Sprinter cab chassis isn't as robust spring-wise, as some larger framed chassis selections.

Full length slide leveling issues - iRV2 Forums
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Old 12-09-2019, 03:43 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Winterbagoal View Post
Here's one other possible caveat on the larger wall slide of the 24D / Murphy Bed models.
This other owner has had problems with leveling their coach, because of the additional weight and tendency to "lean" to the driver's side with the slide extended. Most likely because the 3500 Sprinter cab chassis isn't as robust spring-wise, as some larger framed chassis selections.

Full length slide leveling issues - iRV2 Forums
The owner referenced has a Thor. Not sure how that compares to a Winnebago. Personally I follow exactly the same procedure to level our 24D as I did with our 23H and 24G. Most recently have been utilizing a LevelMate Pro, but the same orange “LEGO blocks” that I’ve had for years. Also, while the stabilizers on the back, while not contributing to my leveling task, they do make things more stable ... I like em!
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Old 12-09-2019, 04:42 PM   #11
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The owner referenced has a Thor. Not sure how that compares to a Winnebago. Personally I follow exactly the same procedure to level our 24D as I did with our 23H and 24G. Most recently have been utilizing a LevelMate Pro, but the same orange “LEGO blocks” that I’ve had for years. Also, while the stabilizers on the back, while not contributing to my leveling task, they do make things more stable ... I like em!
The cause of the lean is the weight of the coaches with larger/full wall slide extended, whether it's Thor or Winnbago or LTV. They're all about the same size and weight, and all sit on the same size and build quality 3500 Sprinter cab chassis. Winnebago doesn't buy "firmer, less likely to lean" chassis from Mother Benz to fix it, that I know of. Put enough weight on one side of them and they'll lean and be harder to level, if you have to. I have a compressor fridge, and don't have to level, unless I want to. Leveling perfection doesn't matter as much to me.
The other models with the smaller couch or dinette slide won't lean as much to the driver's side, they weigh less. It only makes sense from a physics point of view.
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Old 12-09-2019, 06:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterbagoal View Post
The cause of the lean is the weight of the coaches with larger/full wall slide extended, whether it's Thor or Winnbago or LTV. They're all about the same size and weight, and all sit on the same size and build quality 3500 Sprinter cab chassis. Winnebago doesn't buy "firmer, less likely to lean" chassis from Mother Benz to fix it, that I know of. Put enough weight on one side of them and they'll lean and be harder to level, if you have to. I have a compressor fridge, and don't have to level, unless I want to. Leveling perfection doesn't matter as much to me.
The other models with the smaller couch or dinette slide won't lean as much to the driver's side, they weigh less. It only makes sense from a physics point of view.
I understand the physics, too ... but I personally don’t see much difference in the need say for a one inch rise on the low side or say a two inch rise, or even say a three inch rise. Easy to handle. The 24D floor plan isn’t the first large slide for a View/Navion .... the previous 24K and 24M rigs come to mind. I don’t recall any alarming leveling issues with them. If you have other information, please let the rest of us know about it.

With the detailed information displayed by the LevelMate Pro, I can tell you that while resting in the exact same spot, whether level or not, reveals the variance from slide in to slide out is typically one or two inches.

Perhaps Cargo Carrying Capacity specifications between the now current 2020 Winnebago View/Navion floorplans tells the real story. 24D is 1,100 pounds. 24J is 1,141 pounds. 24V is 1,161 pounds. Seems the big slide on a 24D adds either 41 pounds (vs J) or 61 pounds (vs V). No need, it seems, to go get another stack of leveling blocks. I have no idea how Thor or LTV or the other manufacturers compare.
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Old 12-09-2019, 06:21 PM   #13
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Rarebear:

My wife and I have owned a 2020 View model 24D for the past three months. Been out 30 nights and put on 4K miles. Our previous class C was a 2015 Navion 24V, so we have some previous knowledge to compare the units.
The new 2020 unit is great. The wider and longer slide and the murphy bed make for so much room that you don't think you are in a class C. All those extra features that were options in years past are now standard (few exceptions). Alcoa wheels, solar, 200W inverter, truma, 12V compressor refrigerator, U-shaped dinette are all upgrades that we like. The only option on our rig are lithium batteries. No full body paint - that would have been nice.

The VS30 Mercedes Sprinter has a seven speed transmisson vs. the five speed. Shifting is smoother and fuel mileage is 16 mpg average (calculated and indicated are very close). We have not towed the dingy yet, but expect a two mpg difference (MiniCooper).
The Mercedes info center-aka MBUX is interesting and somewhat overwhelming for my analog brain. And don't say the word "Mercedes" because the info center interrupts you with "How can I help you" so you are yelling "cancel" at the info center. But the navigation input can be a voice command instead of typing in address.
I have added SumoSprings to all four corners with good results.
Top three likes: interior size and design, MB transmission change, murphy bed is easy to use and comfortable. Three dislikes: window covers for the MB cab are cardboard and wont stay in place, water connection/ electrical cord compartment are still too small. Not sure about a third item.
I think you would be very satisfied with the unit.
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Old 12-15-2019, 06:11 PM   #14
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Its RV'n

God,I'm glad I don't get so obsessive over the minute trivia with relation to the particular specs of this or that RV. Find one that you like and get out and enjoy.
You'll drive yourself crazy trying to find"exactly " the perfect one for you. Due diligence is one thing, much more, kills the whole RV experience, Cheers!
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Old 12-15-2019, 07:20 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
This thread is really only for those people who have owned and/or used a Winnebago View/Navion 24D with the Murphy bed.

We presently have a Minnie Winnie 22R with a corner bed built on a Ford E350 chassis and the 5.4L engine. We do not like the bed and find the RV underpowered for driving in much of the west and the house seating is not very comfortable to us.

So we are looking for a replacement. For a variety of reasons Class As, Super Cs and anything over 27 feet is out of play for us. We are keeping a 32ft 5th wheeler for some types of trips. This unit needs to be much shorter rig than the 5th for going to other kinds of places.

We are looking very hard at the View 24D with the Murphy bed configuration. My questions are:

1) What are your overall impressions and experiences with it?
2) What are the best three points?
3) What are the worst three points?
4) How easy do you find the Murphy bed to use day to day?
5) What is your typical mpg?
6) How good is it on serious grades, up and down?
We have a 2019 24D and so far put 23,000 miles. We travel for 2 to 3 months at a time, did cross country a few times. Sometimes couple trips we did tow our car.
Mileage around 10 to 12mpg at 67mph on the cruise control.
Great to zip in and out of gas stations and also making U-turn.
Previously we had 5 class A no shorter than 36ft, this is our first class C. We love it, we add rear sway bar and change the shocks. Rides very very well.
We live in CA so we travel thru mountains and lots of tractor trailers and it hold well.
The Murphy bed is great and set up in no time. Great counter space and drawers. The pantry is well thought. Our 12volts refer works very well.
The bathroom has lots of space for a 25ft motorhome.
The negative for us is outside storage and those compartments are low, wish those doors would open side ways...
We would buy another one without hesitation.
Hope this help you guys.
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Old 12-15-2019, 09:57 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
This thread is really only for those people who have owned and/or used a Winnebago View/Navion 24D with the Murphy bed.
......................
We are looking very hard at the View 24D with the Murphy bed configuration. My questions are:

1) What are your overall impressions and experiences with it?
2) What are the best three points?
3) What are the worst three points?
4) How easy do you find the Murphy bed to use day to day?
5) What is your typical mpg?
6) How good is it on serious grades, up and down?

1. Overall we are very pleased with our 18V24D
2. Great fuel economy, small enough to go just about anywhere, easy to drive
3. The circular/oval overhead lights, diesel maintenance cost, the overcab loft bed
4. Using the Murphy is a breeze, I find it much more uncomfortable than the bed in our DP was but that was a longer bed, real memory foam mattress
5. Overall economy is about 15mpg
6. It will climb any mountain where there is a decent road you are brave enough to get on...a mountain goat...and it will fall down the other side like a rock thrown off a high cliff. There is zero engine braking and this is our second rig on the Sprinter chassis. Use care descending and forget anything more than 7%, just go somewhere else. Even one pass we have done, several times, is 15 miles of continuous 6% up and down, brakes will get hot and you will stab them a lot because the transmission only provides a small amount of drag. On such grades I suggest disconnecting the towed vehicle and you will still have HOT brakes stabbing like a crazed demon. Thinking about Hwy 50 and that beautiful pass with no guard rails in CO. I did drive the last rig from Durango to Silverton and on but it had a turbo brake. No amount of dollars would get me to take the View on that road. After saying all that on a steep downhill I literally almost stop and get in 1st gear and ease over the break into the descent and from there it depends on the length and degree what gear I bump up to. In other words just get in the right lane, put on the flashers and drive down like an old farmer - what DW calls me and that's a compliment IMHO.
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Old 12-16-2019, 07:37 AM   #17
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1. Overall we are very pleased with our 18V24D
2. Great fuel economy, small enough to go just about anywhere, easy to drive
3. The circular/oval overhead lights, diesel maintenance cost, the overcab loft bed
4. Using the Murphy is a breeze, I find it much more uncomfortable than the bed in our DP was but that was a longer bed, real memory foam mattress
5. Overall economy is about 15mpg
6. It will climb any mountain where there is a decent road you are brave enough to get on...a mountain goat...and it will fall down the other side like a rock thrown off a high cliff. There is zero engine braking and this is our second rig on the Sprinter chassis. Use care descending and forget anything more than 7%, just go somewhere else. Even one pass we have done, several times, is 15 miles of continuous 6% up and down, brakes will get hot and you will stab them a lot because the transmission only provides a small amount of drag. On such grades I suggest disconnecting the towed vehicle and you will still have HOT brakes stabbing like a crazed demon. Thinking about Hwy 50 and that beautiful pass with no guard rails in CO. I did drive the last rig from Durango to Silverton and on but it had a turbo brake. No amount of dollars would get me to take the View on that road. After saying all that on a steep downhill I literally almost stop and get in 1st gear and ease over the break into the descent and from there it depends on the length and degree what gear I bump up to. In other words just get in the right lane, put on the flashers and drive down like an old farmer - what DW calls me and that's a compliment IMHO.
Just wondering: On the downhills, don't you downshift so the engine/transmission keeps your speed down? On my gasser, I would downshift and then just use the brakes periodically to keep the speed down. Never had the brakes overheat at all towing the jeep and going down the steep mountain grades. If very steep I also drive down hill like an old farmer - so do the big rigs.

Just wondering.....
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Old 12-17-2019, 07:25 AM   #18
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Well, yes, of course you downshift to get any benefit from the drag of friction. The only reason I posted that long diatribe about the braking is most folks who are not familiar with driving a diesel engine rig and have been driving gasoline engine rigs don't understand the difference.


Here it is...gasoline engines have VACUUM, diesel engines DO NOT. What the heck does that mean? Throttle restriction. Well, when you downshift your gasoline engine powered RV and the tranny goes out of overdrive into lockup you are riding down the hill on engine vacuum which is providing braking. When you downshift in a diesel engine there is simply no vacuum, diesel engines are free flow air, no restriction.

To elucidate a bit diesel engines in trucks and large RVs have overcome this issue by adding "engine braking" in the form of true compression brakes called Jake Brakes which close off air flow by controlling the valves **or**
adding an exhaust brake which is a mechanical device in the exhaust system to restrict the exhaust and add backpressure to the engine thereby providing "engine braking" **or** in many newer diesel engines adding variable vane technology to the turbo assisted engine which provides backpressure or mechanical closure adding backpressure to the engine.

So...why not on the Sprinter? The Sprinter valves will not handle backpressure of ANY kind, hydraulic operated and weak. Up to this point there is no expectation of ever having engine braking in a Sprinter.

Still I bought another after owning one. Because it is a nice little rig, handles well, and fits the bill for what we wanted now. You just need to be aware of the lack of engine braking and, knowing that, you are fine to go on almost any interstate in the USA, with caution. When you get into some places as I mentioned it can become a different matter so you just want to be aware of your capabilities. If I did not think it safe to drive we would not own one but I know and understand the limitations.

Another example. We owned an Aspect 30ft for a while, liked it a lot. Gasoline Ford engine with tow/haul mode. The tow/haul takes the tranny out of overdrive and into "lockup" or direct drive mode. The gasoline engine provides excellent braking. I never had a thought about taking any descent in that thing and could easily go down the steep side of Monteagle mountain, 6% for 6 miles, with car in tow and never touch the wheel brakes and at a good rate of descent in third gear. OK, in the View I go down that same hill with car in tow but I'm stabbing brakes constantly - a lot to keep speed under 45 in third gear. I have to cross that thing every time we go West. Lots of truckers give it up on that one for some reason, mostly because they don't expect it in the south and it is continuous 6% eastbound and westbound it has some nasty turns. For fun listen the the song by Johnny Cash, Monteagle Mtn.
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Old 12-17-2019, 11:48 AM   #19
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Thanks for the explanation! I'll pay attention once we get our View. Never had a diesel before. I assumed when you aren't giving the rig throttle, the compression stroke of the freewheeling motor would provide some braking - not necessarily most or all of it.

Glad to hear you're a satisfied owner and even went back for another one. I'm looking forward to a smaller rig and a bit more flexibility.

Best,

Dave
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