RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-27-2018, 04:52 PM   #41
Winnie-Wise
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 255
What's aggravating for many though is they have to make payments on a new RV to enjoy. Instead many end up with a array of problems straight from the factory. Some minor, some not so minor.
Then throw into the mix that you have visible rust forming. "One thing after another" sets in, especially each month when they make their payment.
For some like myself when we finally decide which model to buy it will take a good size portion of what we saved working all of our lives.
All buyers deserve a quality, well made unit that at least won't rust. Rust prevention isn't rocket science. It a sign of careless manufacturing. Just imagine if new car buyers had rust on or under their new cars and trucks within a few months?
Toyota was held to a level of responsibility with Tacoma and Tundra Trucks for their rust problems...........why shouldn't the builder of $70,000 plus motor homes?
I have a good friend who is a muscle car restorer. I think if I buy a Winnebago Class C I'll have him treat the frame and undercarriage for me right off. I'm old school, when I buy something new I want it to look new and will go out of my way to keep it that way.
Ret.LEO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2018, 06:44 PM   #42
Winnebago Master
 
bobmac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Southern Ontario
Posts: 549
Retd LEO
While your thinking and intentions are both sound and correct, the bottom line is no RVs are perfect and whatever you might purchase, you will find a myriad of things that need attention - not just in the first months rather over the entire life of the RV.
Things that never fail in a home, fail frequently in an RV because it is on roads of all sorts and in the most extreme of temperatures over the course of a year. I still am fixing several items a month after 9 years. You have to be prepared to fix the virtually all of these yourself. I am not talking chassis issues which are few and far between thankfully, rather house issues.
You will develop new skill sets, acquire tools that you thought you would never use and after a while, enjoy what you are doing as you see the sights and meet like minded people of the RV world.
It is a great hobby but you will find that a flexible approach is best. If you wonder why a $400k RV has so many issues, you are best to cruise the world or visit high end resorts - both venues where you won't have to fix things.
Unfortunately, these are the realities of RVing and if you are willing to adapt to them , you will enjoy the life. Everyone out there today has the same $$$$$$ invested and most have realized that regardless of repairs, it is a great lifestyle.
Hope you get an coach and enjoy it as much as most of us here do!
__________________
Bob
09 Journey 39Z
Southern Ontario
bobmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2018, 08:57 PM   #43
Winnie-Wise
 
akeagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 487
I think it not only fair to say - and it reflects reality too - that people-wise the RV segment of society is the same the rest of America in that "it takes all kinds to make the world go round". Some of us want (demand?) perfection in the products we buy - especially when spending big money, while others are willing and even eager to buy a rattletrap and patiently restore it operational condition. The vast majority of the rest of us are willing to put in the time and effort - at various levels - to fix things that break and to create and install things that contribute to greater safety, comfort, and convenience. The difference in these "categories" of RV owners appears to boil down to money and attitude. Those with money tend to demand perfection and are willing to pay whatever it takes to achieve it. They also sometimes tend to have little patience for people and situations that are perceived to be an obstacle to their immediate gratification. On the other hand are those who love RVing but are on shoestring budgets are willing to do whatever it takes, however long it takes, to achieve a reasonably safe, reasonably functional, and reasonably comfortable RV. These folks are exceptionally patient and always on the lookout for good deals and advice from experienced RVers. Again, the vast majority of the rest of us are somewhere in the middle. Speaking for myself, I absolutely realize nothing is perfect, even when brand new. I'm a born tinkerer and have been since I was a kid. Once in a while I grouse when the to-do list gets a little long or something requires repeated fixing, but generally I love tackling fix-it projects, especially when I know how to do it, and not afraid to get into things I don't have experience with (YouTube is a wonderful thing!). I also know when something is beyond my capabilities and I'll defer to the professionals. That said, I'm not "set" financially, but we get by. To quote a recent Facebook post, "After many years of living paycheck to paycheck, I've worked hard, accomplished much, and now live direct deposit to direct deposit". Our primary income now is Social Security and my military retirement pay. But we love RVing and are willing to stretch our budgets and make sacrifices when and where necessary so we can press on down the road. Ok, as usual I've gotten very "wordy" here, but it seems that some RVers tend to be a bit intolerant or impatient with others, or seem to look down their noses at others who are struggling with certain situations, some of which are out of their control or involve quality control issues. Its also sad to see that some seem to be comfortable just complaining about their situation and not making serious efforts to educate themselves or resolve problems themselves, and instead, just play the blame game. I've been a member of this forum for about a year and find it extremely valuable in all respects. I suggest we must all recognize that as RVers we're all members of a very special and valuable group, and we must all have the utmost respect, tolerance, and patience with each other as well as everyone else we interact with. And that includes dealers, retailers, and manufacturers. The "Golden Rule" is ….well, Golden! I'm one who truly loves being on the road. Let's do all we can to help make RVing truly enjoyable for everyone.
__________________
2016 Minnie Winnie 27Q on a 2015 Ford E450 chassis. Retired U.S. Air Force. Living in Anchorage, Alaska
akeagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2018, 06:48 AM   #44
Winnebago owner
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 2
Tony,I checked the chassis of our new Winnie and I’m relieved to have found it to be in great shape.
We are new to RVing and got into this realizing I would be doing a lot of
the maintenance. That did not include undercoating a brand new vehicle. Your photos do not appear to be simple surface rust from driving on a salted winter road. Don’t want to over react but if the cab and chassis came from a flood zone that would be criminal. Good luck and I hope Winnebago does the right thing..
Stevemac11
Stevemac11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2018, 07:50 AM   #45
Winnie-Wise
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 255
I agree with several points made. Nothing is perfect that is man made. I have no problem with fixing the problems that pop up with use. The key here is the words "with use"
When we finally decide which Coach to buy I do expect minor issues that I can handle myself. Been around equipment all my life, restored a 67 Olds 442, 56 Chevy, 69 Chevelle. I also enjoy tinkering and learning how to fix things. Done all the basic home improvements and maintenance myself so a few things don't bother me at all and I wouldn't tie up a dealer's service center with minor issues, only for any major issues. You expect things to go south with use to a degree.
But:
I can fully sympathize with the OP's frustration. Very understandable. To give the industry a free pass on poor quality control from the factory will never help to make the industry better.
It is reasonable to anticipate and expect minor issues when new. As fast as they kick them out the door to meet demand it's just going to happen. Major issues though should be rare and few between. Fortunately I do believe for every problem or complaint in these forums there are ten units that hit the road without major issues.
In my search for the right Coach to buy one of the major selling points is the Dealer. So far my Dealer of choice would be Lichtsinns. From their tutorial video's they seem to be a very customer proactive Dealer. I doubt they would want their name on a coach that new with rust issues.
Dealer care after the sale is imperative. In the Dealer's shoes I would do my best for the customer with the manufacturer. If that fails then I would offer the O.P. the option of treating the affected areas with a rust conversion treatment with the understanding that it probably will not match the rest of the frame.
If this was a unit that had been used all season, up and down the road getting hit with roadway particulates or used in a area where salt is used it's a realistic expectation that there would possibly be some rust. But if it's a unit as new and not used like the O.P's for there to be rust this quickly it's a realistic expectation that it should be rust free. Especially if it seems to be a common problem.
I myself would probably just go proactive and take care of the rusty area's myself. I relied on equipment all my life for a living. First twenty plus years with semi's, heavy equipment, farm machinery and then later for 16 plus years my patrol cars. I was taught early by my Dad "Take care of your equipment and your equipment will take care of you" Dad's words of wisdom has held true. Preventive maintenance is everything. When you do have a problem take care of it now so it doesn't grow into a bigger problem. My wife's car is 13 years old, my pick up is 14 years old. Both look and drive like they did when new.
Wow.............I really rambled on.
It all boils down to reasonable expectations and being proactive about problems.
Ret.LEO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2018, 08:14 AM   #46
Winnie-Wise
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: *
Posts: 337
Well said AKEAGLE! Well said!
Old Crows is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2019, 06:24 PM   #47
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Bayport, NY
Posts: 38
I Just want to thank everyone for their thoughtful and informative comments on this absurd predicament I find myself in. I have to say absurd because I sit here wondering WHAT other industry would find it perfectly acceptable to sell their new $70,000 + products in THIS kind of shape? Would we accept and repair our own new home if the builder built it with rotten, termite infested wood because they didn't want to use the proper materials? Be happy with that new F150 with rusted out panels under the bed because it wasn't WASHED when your Ford dealer got it? ABSURD RIGHT? BUT NOW... A MOTOR HOME??.. OH WELL, I'M WINNEBAGO I CAN'T DO ANYTHING WRONG.... I'M CAMPING WORLD, I DON'T CARE!
Anyway, I finally have an appointment with CW next week and actually HEARD BACK from Winnebago via a text asking what happened since I took it to Camping World . I guess I will write and let you all know next week.
TonyOIB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2019, 06:57 PM   #48
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Bayport, NY
Posts: 38
Ok, Didn't go too well,AT CAMPING WORLD but as expected. The Service Director Jeff, was pretty surprised at the amount and degree of rust on the under carriage. I heard him discussing it with the Sales Manager/GM also Jeff, how much there was and was surprised it was new when I bought it. They gave me 2 options:


1/ I can trade it back to them and they would Cash Value it at $22,000 LESS then I paid after only putting 3000 more miles on it


2/ They can scrape and remove the visible rust and treat it with a product called Inhibitaur Liquid Rust Converter made by Continental Research Corp. They said that as far as they know, this turns black after application and does not need additional paint or undercoating afterwards ( but I have yet to research this product so I'm not sure of that yet), I left it there and told him I NEED to be present when they do that next week.
Anyone ever hear of this Inhibiitaur Liquid Rust Converter?


TonyOIB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2019, 08:11 PM   #49
Winnebago Owner
 
Diesel-Lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH
Posts: 117
Winnebago RUSTBUCKET FRAMES

Hello All,


My first new RV was purchased in 1988 it was a microC on a Toyota fuel injected truck. What a sweet vehicle. But first month it had a delam issue, called the dealer he shrugged and said call the manuf. As luck would have it one of my x students answered the phone at the manuf tech department. I took the RV in they pulled the wall off put a new one on, I watched the whole operation over three days, they also washed and waxed and detailed the whole rig inside and out, and all was good. I was told to take it to Ziebart and get the RV rustproofed underneath and in the doors etc right there in town for a decent discount which I did. To my surprise the inside noise level dropped drastically to limo level. Wow. They coated the frame and the sheet metal underside etc of the coach. We never had any issues with that rig for 8 years. Just oil change and drive on the 4th year replaced all the batteries, belts, fluids and bulbs, bought an alternator as a spare but did not change it. Used the old MB preventive maintenance worksheet. Again 3 more years of no issues till we sold it, the new owner kept telling us what a great unit etc for a few years till we lost touch.


Went through sever iterations of various types of RVs then ordered a new diesel bago. What a bag of nuts that turned out to be. Unreliable, lots of bugs, no support from Winnebago industries what so ever even for engine and chassis related issues so went to manufacturer direct and had some power conferences and finally after some minor comp, we let the bago was gone and peace returned.


Workhorse chassis please please ground your engine to your frame and your batteries to your frame very very well, perhaps even have a backup ground. It almost killed my family and that was the last straw for me with that bago.



RVs are way way overpriced for what they are and these manufacturers are getting away with highway robbery. The whole supply chain needs to be brought into focus and refined else we may end up importing RVs from elsewhere. What we are driving are the equivalent of 70s Kcar, when they should be much much better in quality, design and build.


Better get off my tide box before the waves sweep me off.
__________________
RUSTIC is good.
Kudos to those who make Local, State & Federal Parks & Campgrounds possible and to those picking up the slack by Providing Private Campgrounds.
Diesel-Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 10:19 AM   #50
Winnebago Camper
 
Dave11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Tampa Bay FL
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyOIB View Post
Ok, Didn't go too well,AT CAMPING WORLD but as expected. The Service Director Jeff, was pretty surprised at the amount and degree of rust on the under carriage. I heard him discussing it with the Sales Manager/GM also Jeff, how much there was and was surprised it was new when I bought it. They gave me 2 options:


1/ I can trade it back to them and they would Cash Value it at $22,000 LESS then I paid after only putting 3000 more miles on it


2/ They can scrape and remove the visible rust and treat it with a product called Inhibitaur Liquid Rust Converter made by Continental Research Corp. They said that as far as they know, this turns black after application and does not need additional paint or undercoating afterwards ( but I have yet to research this product so I'm not sure of that yet), I left it there and told him I NEED to be present when they do that next week.
Anyone ever hear of this Inhibiitaur Liquid Rust Converter?


Option 1 is about what I would expect. Depreciation in year 1 is pretty harsh but it will level off somewhat in the next few year years.
Option 2 seems a reasonable approach though I have no experience with the actual product you mentioned. As you said it may be a good idea to watch or inspect to insure they do a thorough job with it.

Also, another angle, since you are close to salt water beaches it may be best in the long run to store the unit inland and away from the saltwater. I have read stories on the forums of other RVers camping near the beach and getting a lot of rust very quickly. Some said they would not camp near the beach again, food for thought.
__________________
2009 Winnebago Aspect 28B
Ford E-450 V-10
2012 Honda CRV
Dave11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 01:26 PM   #51
Winnebago Owner
 
Diesel-Lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH
Posts: 117
Rust Proof/Undercoat and sound deadner

After the fix by dealer,
Best thing to do is rustproof/undercoat and sound deadening.
They even provide a touch up service for when the grit sand blasts stuff off around teh wheel wells and at the back of the rig. The RVs we have taken em in and found that there was no real need to touch up. But it keeps the frame and metal surface rust off for 5 to 8 years.


Its well worth it, since the manufacturers are so so bad about it, chassis and the bolt on box people as well. BTW we do our cars and suvs as well even though the manufacturers there have warranties on rust, just to be safer and get a quieter ride than when the manufacturer puts it on the market.


Negotiate the rust proofing/sound deadening service cost offer to work with em to bring it on on a low demand day, its well worth it. Oh yea they will also provide a clear bra if you like, no need for the old cold boulder holders when you can let the beauty shine through!!
__________________
RUSTIC is good.
Kudos to those who make Local, State & Federal Parks & Campgrounds possible and to those picking up the slack by Providing Private Campgrounds.
Diesel-Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 09:48 PM   #52
Winnie-Wise
 
akeagle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ret.LEO View Post
I agree with several points made. Nothing is perfect that is man made. I have no problem with fixing the problems that pop up with use. The key here is the words "with use"
When we finally decide which Coach to buy I do expect minor issues that I can handle myself. Been around equipment all my life, restored a 67 Olds 442, 56 Chevy, 69 Chevelle. I also enjoy tinkering and learning how to fix things. Done all the basic home improvements and maintenance myself so a few things don't bother me at all and I wouldn't tie up a dealer's service center with minor issues, only for any major issues. You expect things to go south with use to a degree.
But:
I can fully sympathize with the OP's frustration. Very understandable. To give the industry a free pass on poor quality control from the factory will never help to make the industry better.
It is reasonable to anticipate and expect minor issues when new. As fast as they kick them out the door to meet demand it's just going to happen. Major issues though should be rare and few between. Fortunately I do believe for every problem or complaint in these forums there are ten units that hit the road without major issues.
In my search for the right Coach to buy one of the major selling points is the Dealer. So far my Dealer of choice would be Lichtsinns. From their tutorial video's they seem to be a very customer proactive Dealer. I doubt they would want their name on a coach that new with rust issues.
Dealer care after the sale is imperative. In the Dealer's shoes I would do my best for the customer with the manufacturer. If that fails then I would offer the O.P. the option of treating the affected areas with a rust conversion treatment with the understanding that it probably will not match the rest of the frame.
If this was a unit that had been used all season, up and down the road getting hit with roadway particulates or used in a area where salt is used it's a realistic expectation that there would possibly be some rust. But if it's a unit as new and not used like the O.P's for there to be rust this quickly it's a realistic expectation that it should be rust free. Especially if it seems to be a common problem.
I myself would probably just go proactive and take care of the rusty area's myself. I relied on equipment all my life for a living. First twenty plus years with semi's, heavy equipment, farm machinery and then later for 16 plus years my patrol cars. I was taught early by my Dad "Take care of your equipment and your equipment will take care of you" Dad's words of wisdom has held true. Preventive maintenance is everything. When you do have a problem take care of it now so it doesn't grow into a bigger problem. My wife's car is 13 years old, my pick up is 14 years old. Both look and drive like they did when new.
Wow.............I really rambled on.
It all boils down to reasonable expectations and being proactive about problems.


I like your attitude and philosophies, Sir!!!
__________________
2016 Minnie Winnie 27Q on a 2015 Ford E450 chassis. Retired U.S. Air Force. Living in Anchorage, Alaska
akeagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 11:12 PM   #53
Winnebago Owner
 
Diesel-Lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: OH
Posts: 117
RV manufacturers.

The real funny thing about RV industry is the non ownership of the parts.
Can you imagine you purchased a car and the antilock brakes do not work. The manufacturer tells you well they are from xyz please follow up with the. Then the airbag system does not work. The RV manufacturer does not take ownership you have to follow up. Where as in the auto industry it all gets centralized with the brand manufacturer of the vehicle. In a new house the builder takes responsibility for the warranty period for the foundation, walls, plumbing, hvac, roof etc etc. The RV guys only warranty for 1 yr and that to not much of it, and after that its go with god my friend. NOTE RVs generally do not get heavy usage that first year any way!



There is a huge opportunity for a paradigm shift in this industry and when it comes the whole industry will hustle to get caught up. Till then they are basking in the low responsibility mode for almost every thing! Slap it together and forget it.
__________________
RUSTIC is good.
Kudos to those who make Local, State & Federal Parks & Campgrounds possible and to those picking up the slack by Providing Private Campgrounds.
Diesel-Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
rust


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Minnie Winnie vs. Minnie John95683 Winnebago Class B Motorhomes 19 03-23-2019 02:36 AM
Compartment rusting away sdrtile General Maintenance and Repair 10 02-05-2019 09:04 PM
2016 Vista rusting compartment hinges flapwing Winnebago Class A Motorhomes 19 01-28-2019 08:15 PM
2017 Sunova leaning badly by 4 inches kwilkins Winnebago Class A Motorhomes 22 08-29-2016 06:10 PM
Winnebago leaking & rusting windshield problems? rlconn4 General Maintenance and Repair 19 04-27-2015 05:38 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×