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Old 12-14-2018, 04:53 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Podivin View Post
The display just stops showing a value for that tire. 'No signal' is treated differently than 'zero pressure in tire', so this doesn't cause an alarm.
When one battery goes out on mine I go ahead and change them all.
I just got an email reply on this question from TechnoRV. I didn't believe them at first because of the previous post they were wrong about auto-on, so I found the attached manual online and verified it's true there is a low battery warning, audible and visual. Here's what they said:

"Yes, the monitor does warn of low battery and which sensor, when it rotates to that sensor naturally it will show the 'low battery icon' about two days prior to dying. When the unit dies, you will just see no reading. Please let me know if this helps and if I can assist further! - [email protected]"

Maybe it's only the new color unit that has this icon for low battery now.
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:38 PM   #22
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I have the TST 507 Flow thru system on both my 5th (color monitor) and Minnie MH (Black % white monitor). Happy with both. As stated above the sensors read low by about 3-4PSI on tires at 110 & 85PSI inflation. Just remember to set the low & high pressure alarm points with that in mind or else you may get low pressure alarms when all is well. I mostly seen this in the early morning when its colder and after having moved to a colder area. Yes, I always check pressure and/or inflate before driving and before the sun gets on the tires much. In our travels we may change elevation considerably thus different morning temps.

I have the 5th's monitor hard wired to come on with the engine, along with other equipment I've added. Haven't done that yet in the MH.

The TST does not show all tire pressure at the same time, that would take a larger monitor screen since it can handle 22 tires. The key point in TPMS is detecting if and when a single tire is getting out of range with the other tires. Keep in mind that the sunny side vs shady side of the rig will change tire temps and thus pressures as will strong cross winds and poorly loaded RVs and how level a trailer rides being towed.

I would not put much confidence in the temperature readouts of any external sensor. The air temp at the end of the valve temp has little to do with what's happens inside the tire, especially the sidewall where many problems arise. A sudden change in temperature is important, but that also results in a sudden change in tire pressure. So I mostly watch only the pressure values. On the MH I have like 4 - 6" long steel one piece valve stems, thus the temps at the end means almost nothing.
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Old 12-15-2018, 01:16 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
I have the TST 507 Flow thru system on both my 5th (color monitor) and Minnie MH (Black % white monitor). I mostly watch only the pressure values. On the MH I have like 4 - 6" long steel one piece valve stems, thus the temps at the end means almost nothing.
That's a great point. Since I have to replace my valve stems anyway to use these sensors, it seems best to get the shortest metal stems as possible to increase relevance in temperature sensing. Otherwise, like you, the temps won't mean much. I've read reports that people can tell when the brakes are overheating, or if you have a wheel bearing going out, or other major issues due to the extreme heat in those scenarios. I had a bearing going out once on a trailer and happen to catch it, seeing slight smoke from the wheel at a gas stop. The rim was so hot I couldn't touch it. That was a lucky day.

So how should I decide on the upper and lower tire pressures to program into the TPMS? My tires says 110PSI cold, so should I use 120lbs high and 75 low? According to the Goodyear chart below, with my 245/70R-19.5 tires, with an 18,000lb RV I should run about 80-85lbs cold (12,000 to rear axle and 6000 to front) to get at least 3000lbs per tire load service. I'll likely run 85-88lbs which takes me to over 21,000lb gross.

What about temperatures? What are other TST 507 owners running for high and low temps to monitor? I didn't see any guidelines in the 507 manual for RV's. I'm hoping others have already gone through this learning curve, however as pointed out by rarebear, I guess it depends on how short the metal stems are to gain relevant temps from the sensor.

What's everyone else programming in for 19.5 tires on their F53 chassis?
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Old 12-15-2018, 01:54 AM   #24
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The TST 507 programming instructions gives recommendations for the high and low temp and pressure perimeters. I don't remember the numbers off the top of my head and the instructions are in the MH which is in storage, but the advice seemed reasonable and that's what I used to program the alarm limits.

If I remember right, the instructions also address the approximate temperature rise that can be expected with changes in ambient air temperature. There will also be temp and pressure differences between the sunny side tires and the shade side.

I'm getting the distinct impression from some posts that while the TPMS concept is desirable, their results and maybe even viability are being questioned because of variables I and others have mentioned. I suggest no system is perfect, but in in our RV world where we're hurtling down the road in vehicles weighing thousands of pounds at high speeds and high temperatures on tires that can be susceptible to blowout. I suggest that a TPMS, despite certain limitations, imperfect accuracy, or other variabilities, is certainly adequate enough to give warning of a potential blowout or other problem and thus help avoid at best an inconvenience and at worst a disastrous and possible fatal accident. If anyone doubts this, check out YouTube videos on RV tire blowouts. All are ugly. Some are deadly. Any tool we can use to prevent that should be considered worth its weight in gold!
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:05 AM   #25
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Over the years I have learned a great deal about TPMS systems. Drinking coffee in the morning I can watch the tires on the sunny side warm up while the shady side stay cool. Also I watch as temps and pressures rise simultaneously. Another thing is where the exhaust pipe is. That sensor will usually run a little warmer.


Our TPMS saved us last Spring coming back home. I suddenly got a warning that one of the right duals was going down. I pulled off onto a exit ramp and gauged it, and sure enough, it was going down. Started my genset and compressor and aired it up. I fully expected to have it go down again, but to my surprise it did not. Made it all the way home and it still hasn't gone down months later. A conundrum.


There are folks here who will fuss and fret if the pressure is below their preference in the morning and take time to top them off. They are always low in the AM. If they aren't really low I wait till I've gone a few miles and see what they register. Almost always they warm up and the pressure comes up to specs.


I don't sit and stare at the monitor while driving. I have the alarms set and let the system worry about problems on the road.
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Old 12-15-2018, 11:06 AM   #26
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The TST 507 programming instructions gives recommendations for the high and low temp and pressure perimeters. I don't remember the numbers off the top of my head and the instructions are in the MH which is in storage, but the advice seemed reasonable and that's what I used to program the alarm limits.

If I remember right, the instructions also address the approximate temperature rise that can be expected with changes in ambient air temperature. There will also be temp and pressure differences between the sunny side tires and the shade side.
I attached the 507 manual in post #21. I didn't see recommendations, only the default settings from the factory. I would expect that since tires are suppose to have prescribed pressures for certain weight vehicles, also attached in post #23, that the settings for different weight RV's will be different. I'm wondering how much higher, and lower from the "recommended" pressure should I go for the min max settings to program alarms into the 507. Maybe I'm getting too picky, but I suppose the pressure in a tire can increase 20lbs (that's a guess) with a hot day, so I'm thinking setting the alarm at 30lbs above my recommended ideal cold pressure for the alarm, at about 120lbs.

I have decided 88lbs cold to be ideal tire pressure for my 18,000lbs RV, plus personal contents, water, gas, etc.

What have others seen for tire pressure variances, from cold to hot?
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Old 12-15-2018, 12:02 PM   #27
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If I recall correctly TST recommends low alarm to be -10% of cold inflation pressure (CIP) and high alarm to be +20% CIP. They preset the high temp alarm at what Michelin calls for, I think its 184F. Unless you really know what you're doing no need to mess with the temp alarm.

For a simple example say your CIP is 100 PSI. 10% of 100 PSI is 10 PSI, since the sensors read low, say 4 PSI, then use 90 - 4 or 86PSI. Like wise the high alarm would be 100 + (100 x 20%) - 4 = 116 PSI. Simple equations are:
low alarm: (CPI x 0.9) - 4 = alarm value
high alarm: (CPI x 1.2) - 4 = alarm value

I have a high quality digital pressure gauge +/- 0.5 PSI I use to get a good reading on the tire pressure. I can take that reading and compare it the value on the monitor and get a decent idea of the error in the sensor. I know mine all run 3 to 4 PSI low, yours maybe different.

I tend to be a little annual about my tires. I check all pressures on most mornings before the any thing moves and the sun has not warmed them much. I may or may not top off the tires depending on how low they are. Inflation needs to be set at this cold value. Don't assume that the natural pressure rise after driving is bringing your tires back up to spec. Tires are designed to be inflated correctly based on load tables and/or sidewall values at cold temperature and then heat up with a pressure increase. This does assume you are running the tires within their load and speed limits. Exceed those limits and you're getting in potential danger zones.

I also check the wheel torque on the 5th wheeler every few days or as other wise needed because of a tire removal. I do not mess with the torque settings on the truck or the MH except after the tires have been remounted. I do not really trust the tire shops to get it right. All my torque values are 150 ft-lbs or less so I can handle that. You guys with rigs needing 200 ft-lbs or better are in a different league.
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Old 12-15-2018, 12:27 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by rarebear.nm View Post
If I recall correctly TST recommends low alarm to be -10% of cold inflation pressure (CIP) and high alarm to be +20% CIP. They preset the high temp alarm at what Michelin calls for, I think its 184F. Unless you really know what you're doing no need to mess with the temp alarm.

For a simple example say your CIP is 100 PSI. 10% of 100 PSI is 10 PSI, since the sensors read low, say 4 PSI, then use 90 - 4 or 86PSI. Like wise the high alarm would be 100 + (100 x 20%) - 4 = 116 PSI. Simple equations are:
low alarm: (CPI x 0.9) - 4 = alarm value
high alarm: (CPI x 1.2) - 4 = alarm value
OK, that sounds like a good starting point, not too far off from what I was thinking.

With GoodYear's suggested cold pressure inflation of 85-88lbs for my weight RV of 19,500lbs, this equates to:

88 X .9 = ~80lbs low alarm
88 X 1.2 = ~105lbs high alarm

We'll see how that goes.
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Old 12-15-2018, 04:04 PM   #29
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The tire pressure I like is 100 psi. If I fill my tires on a 70 degree day and they all are at 100 psi, the next morning they will probably read 90 psi if the temp droops to 50 degrees. After warming up they will return to 100 psi and when on the road probably to 120 psi. All pretty normal.


You can get as anal as you want, but those are the facts. I've learned this over nearly twenty years of experience.


Now when the temp drops to 0 degrees, the pressure drops quite a bit as well, but not probably below 80 psi. When you get on the road they will return to proper pressure.
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Old 12-15-2018, 04:39 PM   #30
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The tire pressure I like is 100 psi. If I fill my tires on a 70 degree day and they all are at 100 psi, the next morning they will probably read 90 psi if the temp droops to 50 degrees. After warming up they will return to 100 psi and when on the road probably to 120 psi. All pretty normal.


You can get as anal as you want, but those are the facts. I've learned this over nearly twenty years of experience.


Now when the temp drops to 0 degrees, the pressure drops quite a bit as well, but not probably below 80 psi. When you get on the road they will return to proper pressure.
I fully understand your point. I don't play wack a mole game with tire pressures. I may or may adjust the pressure in any tire- it all depends. Just that if I'm going to top off the pressure it should be done while the tire is still cold. You can get into trouble going from a very cold morning to a hot afternoon by toping off the tire pressure. If they are operating within limits then life should be good.
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Old 12-15-2018, 10:26 PM   #31
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I believe TechnoRV has a video that deals with programming the unit and I remember the instructions mentioning a percentage of pressure rise that can be expected with temperature increase which needs to be considered when setting the upper alarm settings.
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Old 12-19-2018, 07:45 PM   #32
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I use the eeztire tpms on my coach. It works pretty good and displays pressure and temp readings at the same time. I can set limits to alert me when something goes wrong. I also bought "Tyron straps" from LazyDays to keep my tires from destroying themselves. The Tyron strap prevents the blown tire from collapsing into the rim, and essentially makes it a "run flat" tire, only to allow you time to safely slow down and exit the roadway. Tyron straps are not intended to make your tire a "run flat" for a long distance. I don't understand why "Tyron Straps" are not mandatory equipment on all RV's and big trucks....they would prevent many terrible accidents!

https://www.rvweb.net/best-rv-tire-p...tems-reviewed/
I found the EEZ pass through sensors more reliable than the TST sensors. I had to abandon the TST system after a few years because of many sensor issues. I have had no problems with the EEZ system. Added a repeater. I may not have needed it because the batteries in the sensors were going bad after a year. They do not last as long as advertised. Also, the sensors have a positive, mechanical, function that insures passing air in and reading the tire pressure out. Very pleased with the system. Not advertised as much as the TST systems.
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Old 12-19-2018, 10:24 PM   #33
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Another vote for EEZtire. Very easy to setup, easy to use, and is more affordable than certain other choices. All 10 of my sensors are within plus/minus 0.5 psi of each other.
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Old 12-20-2018, 02:29 PM   #34
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Another vote for EEZtire. Very easy to setup, easy to use, and is more affordable than certain other choices. All 10 of my sensors are within plus/minus 0.5 psi of each other.
I was attracted to the EEZ system but I noticed the flow through filler type sensors are 2.5" long. I really wanted to have the flow through filler type sensors, but being so long exposes them to hitting a curb when installed on my toad driving around, accidentally parking too close to a curb, potentially hitting the curb and ruining the sensor. Even on the RV the front wheel sensors might stick out too much and get damaged.

I'm also considering Pressure Pro, but haven't finished by research yet. Anyone else happy with Pressure Pro?
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Old 12-20-2018, 04:43 PM   #35
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A comment from experience. I had forgotten to remove the TST 507 Flow Thru sensors on my truck when day when doing some back road 4x4 class driving. Well after crossing a frozen stream with plenty of rocks notice a load hssing coming from a rear tire. A sensor was sherd off at its base and nothing there to stop the air flow since the depressor part of the sensor was still in place.

My Viair compressor was neatly stored in the 5th back in town. So a tire change was in order. All was good, no damage done. Lesson learned. Always remove any TPMS sensor when going into rougher county and stay away from curbs and hard edges with your tires when sensors are installed.
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Old 12-20-2018, 07:19 PM   #36
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I'm also considering Pressure Pro, but haven't finished by research yet. Anyone else happy with Pressure Pro?
Our first TPMS was Pressure Pro and they worked very well. We had them for 6 years and the only problem we had was that as the batteries failed, we had to buy new sensors since the batteries were not replaceable. Instead of buying 6 new sensors we bought the EEZ system with replaceable batteries last year.

I haven't looked at Pressure Pro lately but I'm sure they have updated their product offering since we bought those 7 years ago.
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:01 AM   #37
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I was attracted to the EEZ system but I noticed the flow through filler type sensors are 2.5" long. I really wanted to have the flow through filler type sensors, but being so long exposes them to hitting a curb when installed on my toad driving around, accidentally parking too close to a curb, potentially hitting the curb and ruining the sensor. Even on the RV the front wheel sensors might stick out too much and get damaged.

I'm also considering Pressure Pro, but haven't finished by research yet. Anyone else happy with Pressure Pro?
1/ Approximately the same length as the TST pass through sensors.
2/ Mount only on hard stems. Flexible stems will fail fairly quickly with a weighted valve stem cap.
3/ Unless you have a very small and narrow tire, chances are slim that they will hit a curb. (I hope you avoid this practice as much as possible. It does happen to all of us on occasion.)
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:05 AM   #38
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Our first TPMS was Pressure Pro and they worked very well. We had them for 6 years and the only problem we had was that as the batteries failed, we had to buy new sensors since the batteries were not replaceable. Instead of buying 6 new sensors we bought the EEZ system with replaceable batteries last year.

I haven't looked at Pressure Pro lately but I'm sure they have updated their product offering since we bought those 7 years ago.
Point well taken. They are designed for "on road" protection and not off road frolicking.
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Old 12-21-2018, 01:01 PM   #39
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Regarding your battery duration, are you a full timer? Or do you sometimes remove the sensors in the winter when not traveling?

Question: When the battery gets low, is there a warning on the monitor,
Because the eeZRV sensors "sleep" when parked I never remove mine except to change batteries or put air into the tire. I get 1+ years from the batteries. Since the battery is available at the grocery store I stock up on them and carry spares.

There is supposed to be an icon on the monitor to tell you when the battery is low, but I've never really noticed it. I can tell it's time when it's been over a year and when the signal drops in and out on one sensor when driving.

I purchased the non-flow through kind because of the weight of the flow thru sensor being so much greater. And, I removed the anti-theft outer cover because I'm not worried about theft of them. So, adding air is easy. Luckily, with the system I rarely need to add air - maybe once or twice a year.
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Old 12-21-2018, 02:48 PM   #40
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Tire Pressure Monitoring systems (TPMS)

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Truck System Technologies is a supporter of IRV2 Forums, (the mother ship of this forum). I have had their systems for almost twenty years, or as long as they have been in business anyway, and never had a problem.


I currently have the 507 Color System. The sensors are flow through and I can replace the batteries. In fact it will do everything you stated.


The big thing about TST is their customer service. It is extraordinary. They will bend over backward if you need help setting the system up or whatever. Good folks.


https://tsttruck.com//shop.html?market_application=24
I had 4 of the TST 507 on my TT and really liked them....when I bought my MH I needed 2 more sending units so I decided to upgrade to the color monitor and go with the newer "cap" sensors since the standard sensors were difficult to get into the space available in the rear dualies. I rec'd the new system and foolishly ended up calibrating them on a saturday. Yep, I had a problem so I called their number and left a message expecting a call back on Monday - Nope I got a call back in about 30 minutes and they walked me through it ...I highly recommend them
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