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Old 03-01-2019, 05:42 AM   #1
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General information concerning tools and hoses

New to the rv world - first the average length of sewer hose, water hose should I have with me, second what tools should I always carry??

Thanks
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:09 AM   #2
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We seldom stay in places that are full hook ups so we are always pulling up to a dump station. Since we can position the RV for better access, I doubt that we have required anything over 15ft.

For tools, I bought a full tool set for use on boats. It has pretty much everything you need for emergency work. It is also a good idea to carry a cordless drill, some calk and glue, and a compressor for the tires.
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Old 03-01-2019, 09:05 AM   #3
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Best practice is to be prepared with 15’ sewer hose AND another 10’ or 15’ extension, just in case. A 25’ water (only) hose with another 25’ extension also just in case. Lastly, you should also have a 25’ AC power cord extension (30 amp or 50 amp depending on your RV needs), as well. Also, it’s best to have some “dog bone” power plug adapters on hand too.

I have always carried all of these items. Everything gets used pretty regularly except the power cord extension... but I wouldn’t want to need it and not have it.

For tools you’ll need a small toolbox with all the standard stuff. A good cordless drill/driver is a must as well. The only “special” tool would be a collection of interchangeable screw driver heads with star and square patterns. Lots of RV body parts are screwed on with these kinds of screws.
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:17 AM   #4
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A clear elbow with a shut-off for your sewer connection is nice to have so you can monitor your dump. And if you don't have a built in flush hose connection, get an elbow that has one. However, don't hold up the line at the dump station while you clean your tanks, just dump and go.

Here's a link to a pretty good summary of dumping and cleaning:

https://axleaddict.com/rvs/How-to-Ca...-Holding-Tanks

And for what not to do:

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Old 03-02-2019, 11:14 AM   #5
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I second everything above! I have a tool box loaded with just about one of everything. Got the extra 30 amp and 50 amp extensions, dogbone adapters (for example: taking a 50amp coach down to a 30amp plug), and a 150PSI air compressor for filling up the tires.

Don't forget the emergency equipment....reflective triangles and flares (or the newer LED lights). Also, I carry a gallon of automatic transmission fluid for the jacks, a gallon of windshield wiper fluid, and a few extra quarts of oil. Also, it would pay to have an extra fan belt just in case you are out in the middle of nowhere and need it!
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Old 03-02-2019, 01:21 PM   #6
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And an assortment of fuses in the appropriate amp ratings and physical size for your rig. I'd also suggest an OBD II code reader so, when your check engine light goes on you can determine if it's something that can wait or requires that you stop immediately. You can get something relatively simple like this:

https://www.amazon.com/BAFX-Products.../dp/B005NLQAHS

They interface with an app on your cellphone so make sure it's compatible with your phone. The one above is only Android and Windows compatible. Others are iPhone compatible.

I bought one of these, which is more expensive but I got it on sale at Amazon for $81 in Nov 2018:

https://www.amazon.com/ScanGauge-Aut...omotive&sr=1-2
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Old 03-02-2019, 01:32 PM   #7
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All of the previous information is great. We carry a surge protector for between the power supply and our shore line, box of latex gloves, a strap wrench, we keep the water hose and filters in a separate container from all the other hoses so no cross contamination. We have a large fire extinguisher in the truck and one in the basement of the 5th wheel. One of the best things we bought was the elbow for the sewer hose to fit into the dump hole. It has made the job so much easier.
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Old 03-02-2019, 02:15 PM   #8
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Hi Bob is there anything else I need to buy to read a trouble light other than the bafx product you described ?
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Old 03-02-2019, 05:26 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franksteer View Post
Hi Bob is there anything else I need to buy to read a trouble light other than the bafx product you described ?
I noticed that the one I linked doesn't come with the necessary phone app, of which many are available. Some come with apps, so it depends. I bought the higher priced unit since it gives an older coach some of the functionality of a newer coach with an electronic readout of mpg, temps, etc.

Note that the OBDII reader you buy for your coach will work on your other vehicles as long as they're 1996 or newer. Older vehicles used other standards:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On-board_diagnostics

Note that the consumer grade readers aren't as full functioned as those used by smog and other auto shops. Personally I haven't had to translate any codes so I can't comment on how straight-forward in might be:

https://www.yourmechanic.com/article...by-jason-unrau
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Old 03-03-2019, 05:50 AM   #10
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Thanks Bob you need a big help.
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Old 03-06-2019, 06:35 PM   #11
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I'm new to RVing also, less than a year. Lots of good ideas above. I recently bought a 130 piece tool kit. Wrenches, sockets, interchangable screwdriver tips, tape measure, pliers, etc. I have all this already in the Craftsmen tool cabinet in the garage so why buy more? This kit is in a small hard plastic case and each tool has it's own slot. I figure this would mean less searching for the right tool and easily identify if a tool was not put back so you don't lose it somewhere.
I also keep my fresh water hose, filter, etc., in a separate container and compartment to prevent contamination. I also have a black hose to use on the tank flushing hook up to prevent contamination.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:09 PM   #12
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Thus far I concur with all the advice given above.

To give examples of the advice on the hoses and cords, most sewer hookups are within easy reach of the "standard" 15 ft hose, but I once stayed at a site where the sewer receptacle was BEHIND the rig and about 20 ft away. At another campground where the electrical connection was right at the limit of my power cord which is exceptionally long to start with. At still another campground the water connection was farther away than my normal 15 ft hose would reach so I had to add my "just in case" 10 ft extension.

The only thing I would add to the items already mentioned is a spare belt(s) for the engine. Otherwise if one breaks when you're in the "boonies" you'll be stranded. Even if you need someone to install it/them you'll have the right ones to do it with and not risk non-availability or the installer bringing the wrong ones.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:38 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by akeagle View Post
Thus far I concur with all the advice given above.

The only thing I would add to the items already mentioned is a spare belt(s) for the engine. Otherwise if one breaks when you're in the "boonies" you'll be stranded. Even if you need someone to install it/them you'll have the right ones to do it with and not risk non-availability or the installer bringing the wrong ones.



Good point. I had the serpentine belt break at the beach last summer. We were headed to gate on our way home, good thing it happened there instead of the highway. We were about three miles from town and had been camped with a group of friends. Don had a bicycle and was able to ride to NAPA. Thing was we had the wrong engine size, even the RV shop I bought the RV from told us it was the smaller engine. Needles to say the belt did not fit. After calling a Chevy dealer, Workhorse chassis, we got the right size belt and were on our way home finally.


Another thing I keep handy is engine coolant. It was triple digits when we left Las Vegas for Hill AFB, UT. The engine temp started climbing on some the hills, never got into the red zone, but close. A few cooling stops helped. Went to Wally World in Ogden and bought the coolant and filled the reservoir. This leaked out quickly since the reservoir was cracked. Our first big trip since we bought the Adventurer. Opened the radiator and put at least half a gallon in. No more temp issues on the rest of the trip, about two and a half weeks.
Extra fluids, brake, coolant, transmission, etc. always a good idea.
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:29 PM   #14
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Not exactly tools but I always carry Gorilla Tape...clear and black. It has come in handy many times.
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Old 03-07-2019, 01:16 AM   #15
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Don’t forget duct tape, electrical tape, painter’s ‘blue’ tape, some clothesline, and various sizes of zip ties. These items will help with a ‘bush fix’ and get you out of a jam many times. And remember to restock when you use any consumable item.

I also carry various sizes of 2”x6” wood for chocks, pads for leveling jacks when needed, and for assisting in leveling if jacks are not safe or appropriate to use in certain situations.

Happy motoring!
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Old 03-07-2019, 06:02 AM   #16
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Some PEX connectors and a little PEX line are also handy to have.
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Old 03-07-2019, 07:01 AM   #17
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I am not familiar with pecks connectors. What are they? :
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Old 03-07-2019, 08:49 PM   #18
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Tools

Quote:
Originally Posted by Franksteer View Post
New to the rv world - first the average length of sewer hose, water hose should I have with me, second what tools should I always carry??

Thanks
Screwdriver set, socket set, small drill, wire strippers, electrical tape,teflon tape, and a big ole hammer. Take a quick look around your fri and Uluru will gat an idea of the basic tools needed.
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Old 03-07-2019, 08:52 PM   #19
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Pex, the only draw back id the special tool needed. I don’t have one, YET, arh, arh, arh.
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Old 03-08-2019, 12:14 AM   #20
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That PEX crimping tool is very expensive, $60 - $70 or more, making it a questionable item to keep on board.
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