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Old 06-23-2019, 03:49 PM   #1
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Fiberglass oxidation

I have a 2015 Vista 36. The nose is fiberglass with a brown gell coat. It is very oxidize . What can I do to bring it back to looking good. Thanks
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Old 06-24-2019, 10:35 AM   #2
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In most cases but not all, the fiberglass surface can be restored to a nice luster. Depending on just how bad it is, that will determine just what kind of effort is needed to bring it back. I've been doing things like this for eons of time. I've used many various compounds and machines. Most DIY types don't have enough experience to tackle a project like this without potential damage to a surface.
It's not all that hard. I have a DeWalt professional buffer that is used with either a wool pad or a foam pad and, either 3M rubbing, or polishing compounds. Again, it depends on just how bad the surface has deteriorated to. Without seeing yours up close, I could make an assumption that, being a '15, it should not be too bad but, again, being a '15, and if it's been in the direct sunlight ever since it was brand new with no covers at all, it could be in BAD shape.

But, before you get folks on here advising you to start throwing ZEP or any other brand of INTERIOR FLOOR WAX on it, here's just some potential help. If you can, get your hands on a pro buffer. NO, not one of those cheapie random-orbital ones from Walmart or your local auto parts store. You need a higher speed, spinning one. And, you'll need either a foam or wool pad for it. You can start out with 3M rubbing compound and it won't hurt anything unless you stay in one spot too long.

The trick is to get your tools ready and, squirt on a small amount, about like a 1/4 bead oh, maybe in an 8-10" circle. Then, DON'T PULL THE TRIGGER on the buffer yet. Just take that buffer and rub the bead around in a circular motion to get the compound into the wool or foam. If you pull the trigger too soon, you'll spit that compound all over you and everything within 10'. Then, pull the trigger and only do about a 1.5" or 2" square foot section at a time. Keep that buffer moving in a circular pattern. That compound will dry up and you'll see a haze and or a shine. You'll know when to quit and, start the sequence all over again.

Now, move to another section and begin again, blending what you've done, into your new area. Once you've got the whole thing done, then, you can change pads and now do it all again with polishing compound. Talk about a mirror surface, you'll get one with the right application. Good luck.
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Old 07-07-2019, 04:48 PM   #3
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If you're asking the question, then you don't want to use your coach as the test-mule for getting a shine back (maybe). If there are any boat dealers around you, ask their service guys about who does that kind of work on boats.

It is a lot of elbow grease, combined with varying products depending on the condition and the surface. I'm a big DIYer, but in this case, know when to fold 'em.
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Old 07-07-2019, 06:04 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bamaboy473 View Post
If you're asking the question, then you don't want to use your coach as the test-mule for getting a shine back (maybe). If there are any boat dealers around you, ask their service guys about who does that kind of work on boats.

It is a lot of elbow grease, combined with varying products depending on the condition and the surface. I'm a big DIYer, but in this case, know when to fold 'em.

I'm with Bamaboy. Go to a boat dealer/store and ask them. We went to one when we were looking to get the white of the roof a bit brighter/less oxidized and they sold me some polishing wax that had a small bit of cutter in it. Worked great for us.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:05 PM   #5
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Do you recall the name of that wax with a bit of cutter, and would you mind sharing the name? Thanks.
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Old 07-07-2019, 11:02 PM   #6
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For a fiberglass RV you could go with any boat polish with light compound in it such as Meguiars One Step Compound or StarBright One Step Compound.

West Marine, Ace Hardware and others will carry these products. When teaching kids in the boat yard to use these products we use the slower rotary polishers with the terry bonnets since it will be harder for them the hurt themselves or do any really bad damage to the old boats we have them practice on. Afterwards we give them a light polish and a wool bonnet.

For example:
https://www.westmarine.com/buy/megui...18?recordNum=5

These 6 inch units seem to work better that some of the larger consumer models and won't do as much damage as the high speed pro models. That said you are polishing and not grinding. Many people have problems with these from using too much compound and forcing the tools. The compound is supposed to wear out leaving just the light coat of polish behind and not a thick goopy haze so if you use too much they will bog down in short time and if you continue to force them they will break. I can do a 20 foot boat in a couple of hours with one of these using one terry bonnet and one wool bonnet which I then soak overnight in a ziplock sandwich bag with a few ounces of ammonia and water with a dash of dish soap. I have been using the same one for years too.

https://www.harborfreight.com/6-in-c...her-69487.html


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Old 07-08-2019, 04:08 PM   #7
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Not trying to be a smart alec but do you have the clear plastic nose guard? These can get a mold behind them and look like crap.
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Old 07-08-2019, 04:32 PM   #8
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I have the dark brown fiberglass nose on mine, too. I have a rock chip or two and it looked to me like the dark brown is not very thick that the underlying fiberglass is much ligher brown.

I have tried to hand rub the lighter brown areas and it did not appear that I was gaining.

Is it possible that Winnebago is just not putting a very thick finish layer on the inside of the front cap molds when they are making Vistas with the dark brown noses?
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Old 07-09-2019, 05:00 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by rckmtn12 View Post
Not trying to be a smart alec but do you have the clear plastic nose guard? These can get a mold behind them and look like crap.
If you are referring to 3M film that was intended to prevent stone chips, that stuff got mold behind it and removal was over $1200, and a thankless job.

The high-end clear plastic (Lucite) nose pieces have air space between them and the coach and can be removed for maintenance as needed.
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Old 07-09-2019, 06:07 AM   #10
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In some cases the color / tone change is caused by failure of the clear coat. If you're unsure of cause and repair - get a pro to look at it ...
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