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Old 12-07-2018, 09:55 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by UncleGoat View Post
Billincamo,
Stupid question here. I'm new to the whole RV living, and generator using. So, how do you hook the EU2200 up to run the systems? Is it sitting outside the RV or does it need to be inside, and you just crack a few windows? I know that sounds like an absurd question, because, if not mistaken most generators have exhaust, no? That being said, maybe with modern technology, there's something of which I am unaware.
Any portable generator needs to be run outside the RV and you need to plug the shore power cord into it. An adapter is usually needed. If you are concerned about theft, then use a cable or chain lock to something hard to move.

I personally would not use any heater that gets its combustion air from and vents it to the RV. We either use the furnace, which has a heat exchanger, or we use a small electric (cube) heater.
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:34 PM   #16
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Probably asked and answered many times. If its cold enough to run the furnace in a gas class A, not hooked to shore power, what is the down side to letting the engine run (over night) providing dash heat which also provides heat in the rear via the Motor Aide system (heat exchanger under the bed) as opposed to running the generator using approx. 1/2 gal per hour and using your propane? Which is more efficient?
I'm confused about your situation. You apparently have a Class A with it's built-in generator?

Then why not run your generator all night to keep warm and use no propane at all while consuming only 1/2 gal. per hour of main engine fuel?

Keep warm by running the generator to power one or two electric heaters. This is a safe solution ... and two of them should keep the interior comfortable enough to get by in fairly cold temperatures. The only problem might be how do you use the electric heating to also keep the fresh/grey/black water plumbing systems from freezing, which sometimes RV propane furnace ducting systems are designed to take care of along with keeping the interior warm.

We have a small Class C motorhome, but it's 4000 watt built-in generator will of course easily power a couple of electric heaters.

We keep all built-in generator fumes out of the interior while it runs for air conditioning any other purpose by maintaining a slight air pressure inside the interior ... this prevents fumes from entering any small cracks, or openings ... including a slightly open window. This technique keeps the interior fume-free at all times while using the built-in generator.
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Old 12-08-2018, 06:20 AM   #17
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keep any generator 50 feet from the RV when it is being run.
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Old 12-20-2018, 03:58 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by CUP View Post
Probably asked and answered many times. If its cold enough to run the furnace in a gas class A, not hooked to shore power, what is the down side to letting the engine run (over night) providing dash heat which also provides heat in the rear via the Motor Aide system (heat exchanger under the bed) as opposed to running the generator using approx. 1/2 gal per hour and using your propane? Which is more efficient?
There is no reason to run a generator in order to use the LPG furnace; it operates off of 12vdc, not 120VAC. As long as your batteries are in good condition/SOC, you can easily get 1 or even 2 nights worth of furnace use. Been doing it for 30 years, with 3 different RVs.
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Old 12-20-2018, 06:24 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Phil G. View Post
We keep all built-in generator fumes out of the interior while it runs for air conditioning any other purpose by maintaining a slight air pressure inside the interior ... this prevents fumes from entering any small cracks, or openings ... including a slightly open window. This technique keeps the interior fume-free at all times while using the built-in generator.
And how do you maintain a slight air pressure inside? Are you operating the vent fans?
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Old 01-20-2019, 09:26 AM   #20
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One of the best things you can do is not idle an engine, as at idle the processes are not generally optimal, besides why have all those horses in a slow treadmill when they are tuned to at the least cantor or mosey at a nice gait, and at best galloping down the road! The dangers from CO are also very bad and in most cases the tail pipe is right under the bedroom! Generator could be cycled on partway through the night to recharge the battery, sad the RV industry is sleeping and not realizing that a liq cooled generator could double duty as a heat source too! THey are snoring louder than the generator sounds and totally ignoring fuel cells which produce some heat, and co2 as byproduct while running quietly and generating a hush about like a fan running! There are some tiny heaters that run via combustion of diesel or even gasoline (blue air, espar etc etc), they have much lower fuel and battery drain and can heat the section you want heated via a thermostat at a given temp level! unlike your dash heat unless you are in a RV that borrowed from automobile industry dash heat regulation system after what a decade or more of ignoring temperature settings on dash heat and AC !
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