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Old 09-13-2019, 02:25 PM   #1
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What to put under tires when in storage

Looking to store my Forza 34T on concrete for several months. What would be the best material to go between tire and concrete? Wood, rubber mat, Metal? Jacks will be down on wood (2" x 12" x 2' )
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Old 09-13-2019, 08:46 PM   #2
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I've no data. However, considering that untold numbers of RVs and trailers are stored for long periods (and sometimes really! Long periods) on concrete and all other surfaces without tire damage it should not be a big concern. And, not worth the bother or effort.

Presently, ours is in a covered facility with a concrete deck. Every RV there is on concrete and there doesn't appear to be any issues. Some have not been moved for over a year.. maybe longer.

Just inflate your tires to the their recommended pressure before you park it using the placard on or near the driver's door. Check your pressures when you take it out. Drive gently for a few miles when you hit the road.
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Old 09-13-2019, 09:37 PM   #3
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I've seen vehicle dealers put pieces of tile or something similar under the tire of cars in showrooms, but I believe that is simply to prevent the tires from staining the tile flooring. Considering that nearly all tires spend their entire working lives on asphalt or concrete, I can't think of anything to be gained by trying to protect them from anything but sunlight.
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Old 09-14-2019, 03:09 AM   #4
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I have no data as to why I do, but I have always parked my rigs onto 2x12's. I have concrete pads, rock pads etc. I just feel that wood takes some of the moisture away from the tires.
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Old 09-14-2019, 03:44 AM   #5
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Plastic place mats.
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Old 09-15-2019, 02:48 PM   #6
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The issue if I remember correctly, is gasses that rise from earth like radon etc., tend to degrade rubber just like UV rays.

Concrete reduces the pass through of those gasses. If the concrete slab has a vinyl membrane under it like a house slab, even better.

I recommend starting and moving the rig even a few inches every couple of weeks. Tires tend to have memory when sitting for extended periods. “Flat spots” can negatively effect tire life too.
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Old 09-15-2019, 03:52 PM   #7
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The issue if I remember correctly, is gasses that rise from earth like radon etc., tend to degrade rubber just like UV rays.

Concrete reduces the pass through of those gasses. If the concrete slab has a vinyl membrane under it like a house slab, even better.

I recommend starting and moving the rig even a few inches every couple of weeks. Tires tend to have memory when sitting for extended periods. “Flat spots” can negatively effect tire life too.
Not to be overly Geeky here.... Radon (Rn-222) is the decay product of Radium-226. Rn222 decays to Polonium; Po218 to lead, PB-214. Rn222 atom decays by a single alpha particle emission ...a Helium nucleus of 2 neutrons and 2 protons. On atomic scale, alphas are the equivalent of being hit with a super tanker vs a ping pong ball or light beam. However, because of their mass and state of charge they are highly ionizing in watery tissues (like inside your bod!) but may be blocked by short distance in air, a sheet of paper or your skin. So, they do not penetrate or cause extensive damage. Internal contamination in quantity can be lethal due to ionization and cellular (dna) damage. Reference: Radium Girls.

RN222 is everywhere. Hazardous if you trap it in cellars, basements, caves and breath it.

UV is a non particle emission....wave or photon if you will. Electromagnetic phenom whose wavelength is between visible light and x-rays. Although long-wavelength ultraviolet is not considered an ionizing radiation because its photons lack the energy to ionize atoms, it can cause chemical reactions and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. UV causes chemical changes in many exposed things. Fades paint, degrades rubber, burns your skin, etc. In 1878 the sterilizing effect of short-wavelength light by killing bacteria was discovered. By 1903 it was known the most effective wavelengths were around 250 nm. In 1960, the effect of ultraviolet radiation on DNA was established. (WIKI)

So, it is very unlikely that RN222 would pose a hazard to rubber tires. For sure, UV and some of its electromagnetic cousins will ruin your stuff.
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Old 09-18-2019, 04:10 PM   #8
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We have parked our motorhomes for years with one side on concrete and the other side on 2 x 8 wood blocks (slope of our pad for water drainage). We saw absolutely no difference in the tires on either side.
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Old 09-18-2019, 04:12 PM   #9
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Some owners go to Tractor Supply. purchase horse stall mats and slide them with a box cutter. I have seen on YouTube videos of people trying to use a skill saw and not having much luck.
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Old 09-18-2019, 04:57 PM   #10
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I always store mine on wood. I also have Sunblock (Camping World) on my tires plus I have tire covers.
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Old 09-18-2019, 05:00 PM   #11
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Not to be overly Geeky here.... Radon (Rn-222) is the decay product of Radium-226. Rn222 decays to Polonium; Po218 to lead, PB-214. Rn222 atom decays by a single alpha particle emission ...a Helium nucleus of 2 neutrons and 2 protons. On atomic scale, alphas are the equivalent of being hit with a super tanker vs a ping pong ball or light beam. However, because of their mass and state of charge they are highly ionizing in watery tissues (like inside your bod!) but may be blocked by short distance in air, a sheet of paper or your skin. So, they do not penetrate or cause extensive damage. Internal contamination in quantity can be lethal due to ionization and cellular (dna) damage. Reference: Radium Girls.

RN222 is everywhere. Hazardous if you trap it in cellars, basements, caves and breath it.

UV is a non particle emission....wave or photon if you will. Electromagnetic phenom whose wavelength is between visible light and x-rays. Although long-wavelength ultraviolet is not considered an ionizing radiation because its photons lack the energy to ionize atoms, it can cause chemical reactions and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. UV causes chemical changes in many exposed things. Fades paint, degrades rubber, burns your skin, etc. In 1878 the sterilizing effect of short-wavelength light by killing bacteria was discovered. By 1903 it was known the most effective wavelengths were around 250 nm. In 1960, the effect of ultraviolet radiation on DNA was established. (WIKI)

So, it is very unlikely that RN222 would pose a hazard to rubber tires. For sure, UV and some of its electromagnetic cousins will ruin your stuff.

Being a retired nuclear health physicist type....Old Crows is exactly right! Awww, the memories!
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Old 09-18-2019, 05:03 PM   #12
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I store 42 QD on plywood,as wood has connection to “Mother Earth” which I hear degraded tires with long storage times. I also do not use jacks, but have built wooden stands that air ride will lower onto so jacks are not under pressure. Heard this approach from Freightliner Class several years ago after attending GNR. Mike Cody was Freightliner Class teacher that recommended storage be done this way for longer than a few months.
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Old 09-18-2019, 06:23 PM   #13
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Being a retired nuclear health physicist type....Old Crows is exactly right! Awww, the memories!



Indeed, sometimes easier to put fairey dust and unicorn sparkles under your tires than to appreciate the science..
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:53 PM   #14
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I parked both RVs on concrete patio pavers. I've done this to reduce the possible issue of wet/damp earth on tires. No data to prove anything. In the southwest we don't have moist ground very much of the time anyhow. So unclear what I'm preventing, but it seems like a simple and cheap thing to do.

I place tire covers over the wheels to reduce the UV problem. I have dealt with radon issues at both my old workplace and in our home. But I would not worry about radon damage on tires. Once radon gets to the surface it disperses very quickly.

I'd think that the moisture and chemical content of local soil varies so much that it's hard to generalize very much about tire damage. I'd be careful about putting anything made from petro under your tires as these compounds are known to degrade tires.
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