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Old 05-18-2006, 02:09 PM   #1
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We have all heard that we should check our tire air pressure when the tires are cool, not hot. What is the recommended outside air temperature. Cool means different things to different people.

Also, my home base is in Denver. Does altitude make a difference?
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Old 05-18-2006, 02:09 PM   #2
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We have all heard that we should check our tire air pressure when the tires are cool, not hot. What is the recommended outside air temperature. Cool means different things to different people.

Also, my home base is in Denver. Does altitude make a difference?
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Old 05-18-2006, 06:54 PM   #3
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"Cool" means in the morning before you do any driving, whatever that air temp is. (Check 'em cool means the tires are not heated by driving ...it is not considering air temp). Yes, that does mean you will need to add some air in colder weather and then maybe let some out when summer comes based on ambient temperature. Theoretically, I suppose altitude could make some difference but you set the tire pressure according to your tire mfg charts and you rig weight wherever you are in the AM before hitting the road, so you don't really need to think about any small changes based on changes in altitude.
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Old 05-19-2006, 05:27 AM   #4
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Rex - I asked this very question on rv.net a couple of weeks ago. Got the usual gamut of responses - most answers had little value and didn't directly answer the question. One poster had a link that addressed the topic fron tirerack.com, but even that detailed dissertation did not give temperatures or altitudes as a standard.

Everybody and every source keeps saying to check them while the tires are cold, as in before driving. However there are a few pounds of difference among the matrix of sea level, 5,000 feet of altitude, 30 degrees and 100 degrees of temperature.

Maybe an email to Michelin would be in order? Let us know what they say
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Old 05-19-2006, 06:04 PM   #5
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Hi LK23,
I found this article on tire care that explains the effect of temperature on tire inflation and the proper way to account for it. Atmospheric pressure is mentioned but not dealt with. The change in absolute pressure from sea level to 10,000 feet is from 14.69 PSI to 10.11 PSI. Less than 5 PSI and easily accounted for by checking pressures occasionally as you go cross country. With altitude changes of 1,000 to 2,000 feet, I can't see adjusting the pressures for the one PSI change that this would cause. Remember that PSIG (gradient) rises with altitude ie. tire pressure goes up. The hint about 1 PSI rise / 10 degrees Fahrenheit is probably the most important when checking pressures, and the hint on checking cold before driving and then accounting for the temperature difference is handy.

http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoAirPressure.dos
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Old 05-19-2006, 06:56 PM   #6
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The difference of tire pressure to altitude is not even a consideration for aircraft tire pressure at sea level to 30,000 feet AGL. When the airlines build up a tire wheel unit the unit is filled with nitrogen at room temp. It is then installed on the aircraft and the pressure is re-checked and released for flight service.
Motorhome tires are just fine with recomended and adjusted by weight recomendations of the manufactor of the tire at any altitude you can drive at in the USA. But temp will effect the pressure some what. As already stated cool means that the tire is not hot from highway or road use.
A tire that is up to 120 to 140 degrees from driving on it will appear to look fine and will show more pressure then when it is at air ambient temp, so always try and check the tires at air ambient temp when possible.
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Old 05-20-2006, 05:20 AM   #7
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">article on tire care </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
There is some decent info the article, but it's an interesting recommendation that you should "refill your tires every other time you fill up at the gas station." There is no way for you to know what air their need unless you were parked at the gas station overnight! Just check your tires each morning before you hit the road. I never check pressures during the day unless I have an overheating tire or one looks low.
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Old 10-19-2006, 03:09 PM   #8
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Used 100% Nitrogen in my F-250 and 35'FW for two years. Got rid of tire problems and had great service from 100% Nitrogen in and out of desert..mountains..Lost about 1#N/tire over 6 mos. Switched to 100%N in my 2006 35U foot Sucruiser. Using door placard pressures. 100% Nitrogen gives a good, consistent ride-performance and virtually eliminates daily tire checks...assuming good tires, rims and stems are on the vehicle.
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Old 10-19-2006, 03:28 PM   #9
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pubtym:
Used 100% Nitrogen in my F-250 and 35'FW for two years. Got rid of tire problems and had great service from 100% Nitrogen in and out of desert..mountains..Lost about 1#N/tire over 6 mos. Switched to 100%N in my 2006 35U foot Sucruiser. Using door placard pressures. 100% Nitrogen gives a good, consistent ride-performance and virtually eliminates daily tire checks...assuming good tires, rims and stems are on the vehicle. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Why not use "air" in your tires?....since air contains 80% nitrogen?
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Old 10-20-2006, 05:58 AM   #10
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In the old days standard temerature used to be 25'C but I did some research and found that there are several different temps that are now considered "standard". See:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standar...e_and_pressure
for a good summary.
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Old 10-20-2006, 02:55 PM   #11
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FrontRangeRVer: You are correct. Under standard conditions, air in most automotive tire is 20% Oxygen and 80% Nitrogen. However, it's the Oxygen molucules that are smaller than Nitrogen molecules and Oxygen is more affected by temperature and pressure changes. Eliminating the oxygen molecule provides a more stable total gas pressure in the tire.
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Old 10-21-2006, 04:17 AM   #12
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Why not use "air" in your tires?....since air contains 80% nitrogen? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Our local Ford dealer offers 100% nitrogen in your tires for $8.95 per wheel. For a passenger car. They claim you get a better ride (?) more fuel mileage, less tire failures, contant tire pressures, and longer life out of your tires.

The data is true about 20% oxygen has smaller particles. When I asked the dealer what to do IF tire pressures ever drop he answered, "Noo problem - you just fill them up with AIR at any service station (?)

I am missing what, here ?
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:11 AM   #13
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From my experience, ride is better and more consistent. Generally, expect maybe 2-5 # initial pressure drop the first 6 mos to year. This initial pressure drop is sometimes connected with the unpurged oxygen from the initial fill with Nitrogen. Costco offers Nitrogen tops offs-refills nationwide on any of the tires they sell with Nitrogen service. Many car dealers are investing in Nitrogen generator-service units for their shop...and the cost-benefit lights are starting to come on for these service shops. Initial outlay for Nitrogen service unit is still fairly high for low customer traffic shops.

With the pickup truck and motorhome..I have a total of 10 tires to occasionally maintain with 100% N. I'm in Sioux Falls SD and I solved that problem for about$230 by buying a 40 cubic foot portable Nitrogen bottle and needed pressure gauge-hose all from the local Linweld (weld shop supply) dealer. 40 cubic feet did all initial serivce on 6 motorhome tires and two of the F-150 tires. Refill on the 40 cubic foot bottle was $16. You can also purchase just the bottle guage and valve assembly and borrow (deposit) an 80 cubic foot bottle (cheaper way) for home weekend inititial service..then return bottle. Any very minor follow-on service can be from a loaner 40 cubic bottle. Since I'm not a fulltimer,,I check and minor service tires with 100% Nitrogen.. as/if needed before any trip. The 40 cubic foot portable tank is workable for transport in motorhome for fulltiming or just carry the guage-valve service assembly hose...and minor reservice with loaner bottles along the way. Again, my experience shows very little (2-3 #) to none continued Nitrogen service needed over 6 month - 12 month interval. Works for me...and I have much more safety confidence in my motorhome tire health and performance using the 100% Nitrogen.
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Old 10-21-2006, 06:31 AM   #14
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NR4A:

Our local Ford dealer offers 100% nitrogen in your tires for $8.95 per wheel. I am missing what, here ? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nothing......100% Nitrogen in tires has been going around the internet for years now, and generally is concieved as a waste of money with no difference in tire wear or longevity.

Save your money....put AIR in your tires
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