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Old 09-17-2018, 11:05 AM   #1
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View/Navion Tankage and Dry Camping

We are considering a new View/Navion for full time living and working remotely and would really like to spend as little time hooked up as possible. My concern is the relatively low volume of the tanks and no obvious place to mount additional batteries. Would you, please, share your experience boondocking in your View and how do you deal with power/water/sewage while off the hook. Thanks.
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Old 09-17-2018, 01:52 PM   #2
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It would help if you gave more information as to what model and what kind of gen and if you have solar? What kind of water heater do you have, instant or tank.



The water and sewage is easy. You need to find a dump station, there are apps for that, most often they also have fresh water available [usually near enough, don't use the flush hose ]


You also might consider using the search feature and do a little homework - there is plenty of discussions on this and other forums.....
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Old 09-17-2018, 02:56 PM   #3
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We were considering a View earlier this year, so I paid a lot of attention to tank sizes and the relatively limited OCCC of the Sprinter-based chassis. We are typically not boondockers, but having smaller tanks would mean being more mindful of water use and wastewater disposal.

Also, additional batteries are heavy, which would be a consideration to the OCCC. Not a really big deal but sometimes every pound matters.
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Old 09-17-2018, 05:43 PM   #4
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Better check to see if the new View/Navion you are considering has the elect fridge or the gas/elect fridge. The all elect fridge pretty much kills the batteries overnight.



Even with the gas/elect fridge the battery power is somewhat limited for lots of dry camping.

An excellent solution for limited battery in going to lithium. Very expensive though.
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Old 09-18-2018, 12:16 AM   #5
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We are thinking 2018 Navion 24G. Actually, we are sort of torn between that and getting a 27' Airstream with Ford F250. The Airstream has pretty much the same tankage, though. Tough choice, unless we are completely off the mark here and should go with something more in line with Arctic Fox 5th wheel.
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Old 09-18-2018, 06:10 AM   #6
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In my opinion, in buying an Airstream you are buying a expensive "name". Not a good RV to live and travel in. Even for some or most time travelers (weeks to months of traveling) I don't believe it is a good choice.

-- Lack of storage space
-- Lack of holding tank space
-- If you are going to dry camp or boondock you really want windows which open wide for ventilation. The Airstreams I see have windows which only open the bottom 1/4 to 1/3 of the window.

-- You also want to check to see where and how you can install more batteries, solar panels, solar charge controller and possibly a inverter/charger.

Having written the above, I know there are quite a few people spending lots of time traveling in an Airstream. I just never could figure out why, other than the "name".

We dry camp and boondock most of our time on the road, 4-8 months of the year. We would not have an RV that doesn't have sliding windows. That is windows which slide open horizontally so that half the window is open. We also install awnings over all our larger windows so the sun doesn't stream in.

Lots of people have Arctic Foxes and like them. We have no personal experience with them.
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Old 09-18-2018, 07:31 AM   #7
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rostyvyg did you not get enough information on the View/Navion talk questons thread?
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Old 09-18-2018, 11:51 PM   #8
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I have 200 watts of solar on the roof of my 06 View plus 2 6V "golf cart" batteries from Costco. I only plugged in for two hours in the last year to run the AC. I spend a couple of week a month or more in the rig. I have spent 5 days without running the engine in 95+ heat running 2 fantastic fans 24 hrs a day. When I went to leave my batteries were at 100 percent.
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Old 09-19-2018, 12:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestF View Post
I have 200 watts of solar on the roof of my 06 View plus 2 6V "golf cart" batteries from Costco. I only plugged in for two hours in the last year to run the AC. I spend a couple of week a month or more in the rig. I have spent 5 days without running the engine in 95+ heat running 2 fantastic fans 24 hrs a day. When I went to leave my batteries were at 100 percent.

Wow .... only 2 Fantastic fans to keep the inside of an RV pleasant enough in 95+ degree heat!


We also have a couple of Fantastic Fans in our 24 foot Itasca Class C and no way would those have been adequate for us during our 9,000 mile tour of the U.S. one summer. We even had to run our built-in generator and the roof A/C ... PLUS idle the V10 engine and run the cab A/C for a comfortable lunch at a remote reservoir in the Texas Panhandle during scorching temperatures.


We find that the built-in Onan generator powered from the main 55 galon fuel tank in our Itasca is a priceless appliance. We can run it for hours at low noise and vibration if, and as, needed ... due mainly to how well Winnebago installed it.


IMHO solar is nice but for ultimate anywhere anytime self-containment, a properly installed and very usable built-in generator must be available ... in conjunction with any installed solar capacity.
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Old 09-20-2018, 12:35 AM   #10
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The best you can hope for in that kind of heat is keep the coach the same as the outside temp or maybe a couple of degrees cooler. We were at a concert and not allowed to use our generator.
There are some things you can do that help. I have reflectex made for outside the windows that get the sun. I park under trees that give afternoon and evening shade. I only open one window by the upper bunk and put an endless breeze fan there bringing air in and use the fantastic fan in the bathroom on exhaust.This works much better than leaving all the windows open. At night we open both bedroom windows and shut off the bathroom fan. this allows the air being brought in by the endless breeze to escape right by us.
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Old 09-21-2018, 05:01 PM   #11
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We are used to dealing with heat on a sailboat so running the AC is not a concern. Water management, on another hand is very important to us. I know how long we can go with a 100 Gallon water tank on our boat and am really concerned of having just 30-40 Gallons fresh water tank on Navion. And it does not look like there is enough storage to keep sufficient quantity of additional water containers
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Old 09-22-2018, 07:09 AM   #12
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We carry this 30 gallon water bladder: https://www.amazon.com/AQUATANK2-Wat...+bladder&psc=1


You have to have a flat place to put the bladder (bag) to carry it once you fill it. It really is nice to not to have to take the RV to get water while dry camping.
They make a 60 gallon as well.

You do need a battery operated pump to transfer the water to the RV.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:37 PM   #13
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I have a 2016 View V and do a fair amount of dry camping. I made 3 modifications. I removed the toilet and installed a composting toilet. We are very happy with it, no smell, no black tank to deal with and we can dry camp for 3 weeks without having to empty it. I added two Trojan T125 batteries in the outside storage just aft of the entry door, they have taken up a little less than 1/2 the compartment. I added 2 solar panels in addition to the one that came with the unit. Finally I added a hitch mount Stowaway cargo carrier. We use the freshwater tank for kitchen and showers and carry bottles of drinking water. This setup allows us extended dry camping time.
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Old 09-24-2018, 09:01 AM   #14
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Have 2012 Navion 24M with the same usage, work/transport/dry camp. Log 10K miles a yr. Consider the following.


1. Replace twin 12v batteries w twin 6v, more amp hours.
2. Install removeable hitch mounted basket with auxillary fuel tank.
3. Portable solar panels fit in storage compartment, can be used on chassis or house bats w 12V cnctr.
4. Add 12v cnctr in RL bin for H2O pump (Hrbr Freight) carry tarp w bucket 4 rain H2O collection.
5. Replace sewer hose w macerator (campng wrld) that plugs into 12V cnctr.

5.Beef up suspension w shocks, OL springs + HD roll bar.
6. Install SAT ant or ant mountng bracket on top of ladder pltfrm 4 WEB access.
a. mount WiFi/USB "thumb" ant as high as possible while doing above.
7. Add 110 VAC socket under pass seat 4 cmptr & prntr when prtble tabel is used. Cnct to TV bin socket.
8. Build simple shelf, 58"x6"x6" in front empty space under fold out bed 4 addtnl strg.
9. Add LPG connectr to run from external bottle
10. Make a departure cklist to avoid forgetting to secure any of the above when leaving.

11. Install 2 under-table slide-out trays for office supplies

12. Install 3 compartment TV Remote carriers (Amazon) for TV, dish ant contrl, eyeglasses and DVR, 1 more for tooth brush, paste, etc.
13. If U go 2 same spot, need folding shovel 2 dig septic pit for macerator. Also, many hosip have temp RV hookups with dump, some county sewer prcsng facilities, fairgrounds and small airports
14. Build an RV adapter for elect car charging stations.
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