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Old 06-01-2018, 06:42 PM   #43
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Well said Kayak.

To the OP: If you are still with us and haven't done so already, you might want to take a look at my earlier post, #19 on page 2.

It got buried because it wasn't immediately posted. There was a delay because I haven't written much here -- not enough to be in the 'circle of trust' -- and I included a link so a moderator had to approve it.

By the time it was posted there had been several other comments so it was stuck in the middle of the deck so to speak.

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Old 06-02-2018, 09:41 AM   #44
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SAJ, I read your link material on building your own exhaust system for your built-in diesel generator ... a nice writeup.


FWIW, for long runs of our built-in (gas) generator we close up all windows and roof vents except for the roof vent with a reversible fan in it. We set this vent fan's rotation to "Air In" and set it's speed to "Low".


This sets up, and maintains, a small amount of air pressure in the interior of our Itasca Class C motorhome. This prevents any generator fumes from entering the interior through any opening - no matter how small any crack or other small opening might be and no matter what outside winds might be doing. This works like a champ.


If it gets too warm inside whenever we're doing these long generator runs with all windows and other roof vents closed, we of course can also run the A/C to keep the interior temperature pleasant.
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Old 06-02-2018, 01:40 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil G. View Post
SAJ, I read your link material on building your own exhaust system for your built-in diesel generator ... a nice writeup.


FWIW, for long runs of our built-in (gas) generator we close up all windows and roof vents except for the roof vent with a reversible fan in it. We set this vent fan's rotation to "Air In" and set it's speed to "Low".


This sets up, and maintains, a small amount of air pressure in the interior of our Itasca Class C motorhome. This prevents any generator fumes from entering the interior through any opening - no matter how small any crack or other small opening might be and no matter what outside winds might be doing. This works like a champ.


If it gets too warm inside whenever we're doing these long generator runs with all windows and other roof vents closed, we of course can also run the A/C to keep the interior temperature pleasant.
Very smart Phil!

That's the first time I've heard anyone mention that idea.

Now I have another project -- replace the Fantastic Fan with a reversible model...

Pressurizing the coach would eliminate the need to reroute the generator exhaust with a 'Gen-turi' style setup, except in campgrounds where the sites are close (which is many/most of them it seems). Chances are -- esp with the diesel -- the fumes may bother other campers.

Even *with* the exhaust routed up to the roofline it can be sometimes be an issue (although much reduced).

We try to boondock and dry camp as much as possible, and only stay in campgrounds that aren't packed. Of course, that's a lot easier if you can avoid the peak season, June through August.

So I'm glad I installed the DIY 'Gen-turi', but I am going to look into getting a reversible fan. Great idea!
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Old 06-11-2018, 04:42 AM   #46
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Brilliant! Also, I think you can modify your existing Fantastic Fan to reverse flow with a different switch. I'd inquire with the FF manufacturer before buying a new fan. Larry, 2014 Reyo P.
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Old 06-11-2018, 10:57 AM   #47
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Off topic, but .... I also use the technique I mentioned above to maintain pressure inside our Itasca Class C while traveling dirt and gravel roads, as we sometimes travel off-highway.


The small amount of air pressure keeps all dust from the road surface out of the interior of the coach and cab areas. Of course while doing this to help the keep the interior clean, you also should keep the dash ventilation system set to "Maxx Air" so that while heating or air contitioning the cab area you are only recirculating internal air instead of having new dusty air coming in from the outside.



With our Ford E450 chassis when the vent system is set to "Maxx Air", we can use the temperature control to make this recirculated air warm or cold. The term "Maxx Air" on the cab vent control is misleading ... as some folks may think that this only applies when using the air conditioning mode to cool.
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Old 06-22-2018, 06:39 PM   #48
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Phil, maintaining pressure inside your RV is a viable idea. I agree and use the dash air concept.
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Old 06-23-2018, 12:32 AM   #49
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We found that on dusty/gravel roads using roof vents with the dash air OFF is better so that no air can enter through the dash system. The dash outside air intake is down kindof low somewhere around the hood or front fenders - where dust is more likely to be present from the road.


Using the roof vent establishes and maintains the coach interior pressure using air up high at roof height. If it's also warm/hot outside, we then run the cab air conditioning on it's air recirculation mode so it does not bring in any outside air from the intake that is somewhere around the hood or front fenders.
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Old 06-24-2018, 09:01 AM   #50
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AC air intake

My Navion had an air intake over on the passenger side under the windshield cowling, where there was a cabin air filter in the big air intake box. Fresh air entered through the vents below the windshield, then to the air intake box, and through the cabin air filter. If you're getting road dust in, see if you still have your filter installed. You shouldn't have dirt entering the cabin from the vents!
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:30 AM   #51
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Not a question about your generator, but hows your compressor fridge working, especially when boondocking? Im looking at the same coach right now, but have serious concerns about the compressor fridge.
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Old 09-20-2018, 05:09 PM   #52
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Not sure who you directed the question to but here is a stab. The refrigerator is working great, holding temps well. There are caveats. One you need an air dam (covered in detail on a long post on iRV2). Then there were several things done to repair it trial and error and finally it was replaced. Sometime around the end of August another poster started a thread on this site (you can find it I know) which seems to indicate WGO and Norcold have a final resolution to the issue of variable operation and high current draw on the house batteries. Essentially it involves removing a fuse holder on early 18-19 models and wire nut the ends together. I am still on the road, have not done the mod yet. My refrigerator is working great on the two T-1275 batteries I installed, still drawing far too much power from them overnight however I have "spare". If you are looking at a new production coach it should not have the problem based on current info. After all that, yes we boondock fine even use the CPAP at night with humidifier and 300AH of battery works. Still we have had hot weather which means the Air Cond ran a lot which means the generator has 130 hours on it already. Get the diesel generator. The solar helps but normally it is just decoration because you gotta park in the sun which means you must run the genny or suffer. I gave up tent camping about 25 years ago and RV means comfort - which means run the generator. I'm very pleased with the economy of diesel used by the QD3200, no issues at all there. There are many, many, very long threads on several forums discussing the refrigerator and possible fixes and issues. I'm feeling pretty good that it works and in cooler weather the solar works as well. We have made it three days with no generator, no shore, no driving so if you look at cool temps - life is good.
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Old 09-21-2018, 09:56 AM   #53
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Thanks Kayak. I appreciate your thoughts on this and you have provided me with some confidence that going with a coach with a compressor fridge just might work for us. Still, given all the years of relatively flawless service with our absorption units even with their drawbacks, you’ve got to wonder why we’re sort of tying ourselves in knots trying to make the new fridges and their power supply work?

I’m probably going to make an offer on a new Navion, but the whole fridge system still feels like a mistake.m

Thanks
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Old 10-06-2018, 08:25 AM   #54
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The propane generator was almost a deal breaker for me, but couldn't pass up the price for the MH. I was gonna change it out for a diesel if I couldn't tolerate the propane. After two years and 35000 miles, we are pleased with the propane. It suits our short term needs perfectly and has not skipped a beat. Very reliable and clean burning. After about 90 hours of our use, the oil still looks brand new, which I changed out with synthetic when we first got it. I figured we could get about 20 hours of use with a full tank. Your milage may vary. Larry 2014 Reyo P
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