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Old 04-05-2019, 06:14 AM   #1
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Tire Pressure on 2001 Adventurer 32V

Hello WinnieOwners,
I am a new and proud "new to me" owner of an Adventurer 32v and am so far loving it.

As I am preparing for my first big trip, I have been researching "the correct tire pressure" for my RV and have now more questions than I started with.

I have always been an advocate of inflating to the vehicle recommended specs found on the badge of the vehicle. But have since found that this is conflicting with what some others are saying.
I've read I need to load the coach to max (or known) capacities, then take it to a weigh station to get all four corners weighed. Then.... go fetch the tire Mfg'rs weight spec chart and inflate each tire/axle accordingly.

What gives...?
The tires are currently filled to approximately 90psi(+/-) with the exception of the rear drivers inner tire, which I will top off soon.

Can someone give me a good simple rule on tire inflation that won't require a weigh station, calculator, slide ruler and Thermodynamic engineering chart?
Weight rating for each axle are 13,500lbs(rear) and 7,000lbs(front).

Thanks for your feedback and this cool site.

John
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Old 04-05-2019, 08:44 AM   #2
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sorry, john. the only way to properly inflate your tires is to
know what your RV weighs. but you need to know that anyway to ensure the rig does not exceed its gross axle weight rating (GAWR) and gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). i know...it DOES seem complicated but it really isn’t. no slide rule needed.

to start, keep your tires inflated to their current setting (ya gotta start somewhere) and load your MH as you would for a trip including food, clothing, supplies, fresh water, full fuel and LP tanks, pets and other stuff. don’t forget people although you can always just add their weight after the fact.

find a certified scale (truck stops, moving companies, material handling companies (gravel, dirt, etc) and get individual axle weights. you’ll likely receive advice to get individual corner weights and that IS best but it can be difficult to find a scale that can handle that. individual axle weights will suffice.

compare the actual weight of each axle to your MH’s published GAWR. if you don’t know the GAWR call Winnebago tech support at 1 (800) 537-1885. give them the VIN and they can tell you the various weight ratings. make adjustments if either axle is overweight by off-loading stuff (don’t be surprised if this happens...very common.

now consult the tire mfgs inflation chart and adjust as needed. be sure to do this when the tire is as cold as possible. all recommended tire inflation tables are based on cold inflation.

some things to remember:
- unlike automobile tires class A RV tires are inflated to the minimum pressure for the load being carried.
- the PSI rating on the tire sidewall is the maximum cold inflation for the tire.
- some folks will add 5-PSI to the recommended pressure just ‘cause. this is fine as long as the maximum tire pressure is not exceeded. but, the higher the tire inflation the rougher the ride.
- inflating to less than recommended pressure increases heat and stress on the tire which can result in faster tire wear and failure.
- some folks just keep it simple and inflate to the maximum sidewall pressure. a lot of OTR truckers do that because the weights they carry can vary from load to load. the weight load of your RV will tend to creep up over the years but it shouldn’t change drastically. i make it a point to re-weigh every 2-3 years. maximum PSI may affect your ability to “feel the road”.

hope this helps.
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Old 04-05-2019, 09:10 AM   #3
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Thanks for that Rich.
And that's the answer I was afraid to hear.
I will try to get the actual weights and get these things filled up right.
So just for kicks, It's better to over fill than under, right?

Thanks
John
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Old 04-05-2019, 09:21 AM   #4
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Just to be clear, there is absolutely nothing wrong with the way you're doing it. You'll be completely safe and your tires will wear just fine. The only real downside is that your ride may be more harsh than it need be. If your happy with your current ride, just continue to do what you're doing. This assumes that your current tires match the original tire specs for your rig and for which the "badge" PSIs were calculated. If, for example, you've upgraded your tires from load range F to load range G, you'll need to either weigh your rig and use the tables for your new tires or re-calculate your PSIs from the tables for your new tires using the GAWR weights specified on your "badge" for your front and rear axles.

Using the weight/psi tables will fine tune things and hopefully improve your ride. If you're using the tables, you'll want to add a 10% safety factor to the specified PSIs. This isn't the time for guesswork since under-inflation can be dangerous.

All in all, it sounds more difficult than it is. The biggest issue for me was overcoming my anxiety of using the scales at the truck stop. Just pick a slow time and don't be afraid to let the attendant know that you're a newbie to the process.

There's a good sticky on all this on IRV2:

Just weighed and have PSI question - Page 2 - iRV2 Forums

Also, you might want to read some of Tireman9's posts both here and on IRV2. He's a retired tire engineer and really knows his stuff. He also has a blog at:

RV Tire Safety
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Old 04-05-2019, 09:33 AM   #5
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Thanks Bob, but I'm currently not doing anything, yet...

Are you saying if the vehicle badge calls for 70psi front and back that I'll be good with that + 10%?
I'm not opposed to getting it weighed and adjust accordingly but I just find it funny that full of fuel, propane and water is waaay different that being close to empty. Likely by hundreds of pounds, maybe over a 1000. So this will throw your calculations off by 5 or 10 pounds per tire.
Wondering if people are actually removing and adding air at any given time during the trip.

So what you say "go with vehicle badge and add 10%" makes more sense because of the change of variables like temp, altitude, weight, etc...

Thanks again for all the feedback!

John

PS. all tires are load range H and I think the original tires that came on it were G. If that matters or not...?
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Old 04-05-2019, 10:18 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benefishall View Post
Thanks for that Rich.
And that's the answer I was afraid to hear.
I will try to get the actual weights and get these things filled up right.
So just for kicks, It's better to over fill than under, right?

Thanks
John
i 'spose you could put it that way, john, but for me, the safety of my wife and i as we roll down the road is of primary importance. i prefer to know instead of guessing or assuming. besides, you may find that 90psi is the correct inflation but why not be sure? if you decide to start towing a vehicle you're going to need to know the actual weight on your MH's axles anyway to help determine how much weight you can safely tow.

look, ya gotta load up for a trip anyway, right? so a day or two before you take off take tbe rig to a scale and get 'er weighed. that will give you time to make adjustments to the load if either axle is overweight as well as give peace of mind knowing the tires are properly inflated. and if you do find that one or both axles are overweight, well, that's something you should know anyway, right? an overweight chassis can affect handling, braking distance, pre-mature aging of springs, shocks, etc.

i'm sorry that this is not the answer you were hoping for, john, but i think you'll discover that this will turn out not to be the huge hassle it may appear on paper to be.
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Old 04-05-2019, 10:33 AM   #7
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Yeah Rich, I hear ya.
And thanks for guilting me into getting this done by saying my wifes and kids lives are on the line!

No, you're right, I just haven't found that this much went into tire inflation and find it a little amusing.
If I fill my fuel tank, water tank and propane (1,400+lbs) and drive from Michigan to Arizona stopping 3 times to camp, shower, refuel, etc... the coach weight could fluctuate or decrease 400lbs, 500lbs or more by the time I get to my destination.
In that case I'd be over inflated, right?

So why not plan for max and go about your day...?

But I do hear ya and as you may be able to tell, I like to know more than I need to just to be safe.

I guess it's off to the weigh station I go.

Really appreciate the feedback.

John
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:25 AM   #8
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Since the Adventure is "new to you" and 18 years old. Someone's gotta ask... what's the age on the tires. RV tires almost always AGE out before wearing out. 7 years MAX. And if you're close you might consider replacing them earlier because you don't know how they've been treated in the past.

The placard on the coach probably calls for more than 90 psi per tire. Mine is 100 front and 105 rear. We were leaving on a month long trip and all topped up and loaded the day before we left. I drove to a CAT scale and got weighed WITH the toad on and without.

I learned two things. That my weights for each axle were good to go and my total weight was 1200 lbs below the 30,000 max for my chassis. GOOD NEWS! I also learned my tires were ~15+ lbs over the needed inflation. I used the Michelin tire chart to determine front and rear pressures and even with a safety 5 psi extra I was able to reduce the fronts to 85 psi and the rears to 90 psi. What a difference in ride comfort and even handling.

I had driven for a year with the 100/105 pressures and could kick myself for waiting so long to attend to this task.
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benefishall View Post
Thanks Bob, but I'm currently not doing anything, yet...

Are you saying if the vehicle badge calls for 70psi front and back that I'll be good with that + 10%?
I'm not opposed to getting it weighed and adjust accordingly but I just find it funny that full of fuel, propane and water is waaay different that being close to empty. Likely by hundreds of pounds, maybe over a 1000. So this will throw your calculations off by 5 or 10 pounds per tire.
Wondering if people are actually removing and adding air at any given time during the trip.

So what you say "go with vehicle badge and add 10%" makes more sense because of the change of variables like temp, altitude, weight, etc...

Thanks again for all the feedback!

John

PS. all tires are load range H and I think the original tires that came on it were G. If that matters or not...?
1. If you're filling to the badge PSIs you don't add the 10%, that's just a safety margin if you're weighing your vehicle. The badge PSIs are based on your GAWRs, which are maximum weights and maximum PSIs. If the badge calls for 70 psi, inflate to 70 psi. The 10% factor is only used if you're using actual weights and tables since the table PSIs are minimums for a given weight. Remember that, no matter what method is used, all tires on an axle should be at the same PSI.

2. Water and fuel can be very heavy, plus all your stuff, plus your passengers, etc. You'll want to weigh with full fuel, full propane, full freshwater tank, empty waste tanks, all your stuff, plus, if your passengers aren't on board, an allowance for them.

3. No need to add or subtract air during your trip for normal weight*, altitude or temperature variations. Normal tolerances are built-in to the specified PSIs and your PSIs will naturally increase as you drive and heat up the tires. Just remember the specified PSIs are "cold". This is from a Bridgestone site:

Vehicle manufacturers specify PSI – literally “pounds per square inch” of pressure – assuming tires are cold. Tires are considered cold when the vehicle has been parked for three hours or more, or if the vehicle has been driven less than a mile (1.6 km) at moderate speed. PSI is the unit your pressure gauge uses to provide readings.


* Now, let's say that you weighed your "fully loaded" vehicle and you're 1,500 lbs below your GVWR and you used your table for your PSIs. The table PSIs + 10% will likely be below your badge PSIs. If, during your trip, you load up with 1,000 lbs of pretty rocks, you're definitely going to have to re-visit your PSIs either via your tables or by inflating to the badge PSIs. If, on the other hand, you'd already inflated to the badge levels, you don't need to do anything. It's all a matter of degree and there's no need to adjust for minor weight increases like an extra passenger or so (that's what the 10% is for). And, weight decreases aren't an issue at all.
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Old 04-05-2019, 12:31 PM   #10
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OK I think I got it and I have already arranged to go get the thing weighed and am ready to do some adjusting.
Good question on the tires and I forgot to mention that.
Fronts: Hankook AH11 @ 2016
Rears: Hercules H-902's - 2 @ 2017, 1 @ 2019 and the other unknown 2018.

So I think I'm good with the age and they all appear to be in great shape.

All but the unknown were at or near 90/95psi, so maybe the old owner was pulling a toad at some point.
I'm planning on swapping the fronts next year and the rears the following year. Just so that I have a better idea of when to swap all the fronts and the rears at the same time.

Can't thank you enough for the information.
Very helpful!

Can't wait to get on the road

John
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Old 04-05-2019, 04:19 PM   #11
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good luck, john. let us know how it went when you got it weighed.
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Old 04-05-2019, 06:22 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benefishall View Post
All but the unknown were at or near 90/95psi, so maybe the old owner was pulling a toad at some point.
Pulling a toad 4-down wouldn't have any impact on appropriate MH tire pressures since there's no material tongue weight added to the rig (the toad's own tires carry its weight). The weight added to the MH would be the weight of any drop receiver used plus about 50% of the tow bar's weight. The actual amount will depend on the angle of the tow bar. In any case it would be negligible.

Towing it on a dolly or trailer would add tongue weight but that should be less than your max tongue allowable tongue weight, most likely 500 lbs. In any case the total would still need to be under your GVWR so the placard PSIs would be adequate.

There may be no rational reason for what the PO had done if the PSIs exceeded the levels on the placard. Since the placard levels will always be less than the sidewall PSIs, I suspect some owners will pick a number somewhere in between just to be on the safe side with respect to under inflation.
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Old 04-11-2019, 03:51 AM   #13
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You can use one of my spreadsheets to calculate a pressure.
Can be found in next map on my onedrive that belongs to my hotmail.com adress with same username as in this forum ( so jadatis).
https://onedrive.live.com/?id=A526E0...26E0EEE092E6DC
You can also fill in in the claud excell programm , but then if you look back later, you see your chanches you made or from others behind you.
So best is to download it to your computer, and after eventuall virus-check, open it in Excell or similar programm on your computer.
You can also download it to your own ondrive and use the excell like programm in the claud.


Determing the real weights, best on seperate axle-ends, , is as already written, the most tricky part in it all.
If you only fill in in part 1 of my spreadsheet, the GAWR's and GVWR, then the spreadsheet calculates for those, front adding 5% because front seldom overloaded, but if you have other idea , you can chanche the % in dark blue cell.


Rear calculates then for lighter vehicles adding 18% and a floating scale to 10% for the heavyer motorhomes.
If real weights filled in , uses 10% adding on given weight for R/L unbalans.


And if you still think this is to complicated , let me do it, give the needed data.
If you have a tag-axle so 3 axles total of wich 2 behind different gawr, you have to make 2 calculations, the spreadsheet is made for only 2 axles ( or tamdem).
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Old 04-11-2019, 05:06 AM   #14
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Be mindful that tires over inflated for the load that they will be carrying will wear faster and hotter in the middle of the tread so you do not want them grossly inflated above the load they are carrying.

When you have it weighed it has to be loaded as it will be when your traveling and while its loaded this way the wheel alignment also needs to be checked so it won't wander on the highway and have the tires wear unevenly.

Hopefully they gave you the file folder Black Bag that Winnebago Provided with all the paper work, manuals, dog house wrench, tools for the slides/jacks, etc in it. If not the Winnebago material can be downloaded directly from Winnebago's web site under Resources.

See:
https://winnebagoind.com/resources/b...nturer-bro.pdf
https://winnebagoind.com/resources/m...Adventurer.pdf

While your there be sure to check out the other resources and to fill out the Second Owner Registration:
https://winnebagoind.com/product-res...ct-information
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