Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-24-2011, 09:48 PM   #1
Winnebago Master
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Northern Oklahoma
Posts: 871
Radiator removal

On a 2004 Meridian 36G, is the radiator removed out through the opening of the engine hood or is it dropped out the bottom after removing all bolts and hoses? Just know the Freightliner shop will charge 1-2 thousand dollars for removing it, which always surprises me when most cars/PUs radiators can be removed in 30 minutes or so.
Any help appreciated as I probably have this coming up very soon.

Wagonmaster2
wagonmaster2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2011, 11:37 PM   #2
Winnebago Master
 
cbeierl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 1,495
When I had mine removed/cleaned/replaced at Freightliner of New Hampshire (Londonderry) two years ago it cost me just over $1000 in labor. I didn't get to watch what they did, but here's their description of the task:
Drained coolant, removed rear grill assembly, removed power steering reservoir, removed coolant tank, removed panel above radiator, removed radiator, and removed the charge air cooler. Cleaned the charge air cooler and the radiator as was needed. Flushed cooling system. Reassembled as was needed. Filled truck with ELC. Ran motor home and inspected for leaks, and operations are ok.
__________________
Chris Beierl

2005 Winnebago Vectra 36RD
cbeierl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2011, 10:49 AM   #3
Winnebago Master
 
smlranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Glen Allen, VA
Posts: 2,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbeierl View Post
When I had mine removed/cleaned/replaced at Freightliner of New Hampshire (Londonderry) two years ago it cost me just over $1000 in labor. I didn't get to watch what they did, but here's their description of the task:
Drained coolant, removed rear grill assembly, removed power steering reservoir, removed coolant tank, removed panel above radiator, removed radiator, and removed the charge air cooler. Cleaned the charge air cooler and the radiator as was needed. Flushed cooling system. Reassembled as was needed. Filled truck with ELC. Ran motor home and inspected for leaks, and operations are ok.
Chris, do I understand that you had to replace the radiator? If so, did it start leaking? What was the cost of the radiator itself?

In looking at mine, I would guess the rad/CAC could come out the rear access opening. My dad owned a radiator shop and I worked there when I was a teenager, so pulling and replacing a radiator is something I might try if mine needs replacing before I get too old to do it .
__________________
'07 Country Coach Allure 470 Siskiyou Summit #31578, Cummins ISL 425; 2014 Ford F150 toad; Air Force One Toad Brake.
Glen Allen, VA; Smith Mountain Lake, VA.
smlranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2011, 01:41 PM   #4
Winnebago Owner
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 177
If someone here removes their radiator please take pictures and post. It would really help the rest of us.
thanks
jim & debbie, 04 Journey 34h
jimmccreary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2011, 02:17 PM   #5
Winnebago Watcher
 
Parkerrs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Dallas, Ga.
Posts: 2
Wagomaster2, yes most auto and p/u radiators can be removed in around 30 minutes. But we're not talking about a car here, it's a motorhome. Due to the design and packaging of the house around the radiator it's impossible to do this quickly.

If you remove it from the rear then bodywork (i.e. grills and rear panels) must be removed first. Also unlike a car you don't just open the hood and have access to everything. After removing the rear articles the tech will also have to be going in and out of the coach to access the hoses and items on top from the engine side (time consuming). After everything is drained, disconnected, and gotten out of the way then you can remove the radiator. Unlike a car radiator which nowadays is made with an aluminum core and plastic tanks or the older auto radiators made from brass you are hefting a different animal. Size alone causes difficulty, I don't know about the coach chassis manufacturers but on OTR trucks radiators are made with a "steel" core and steel tanks. The steel is due to the greater vibration which has to be dealt with and to provide longevity (5000,000 miles or more). So now you have both size and wieght working against you as well as avoiding damage to things like the charge air cooler, which means it's not a one man job to actually take it out or put it in the chassis without an overhead crane or hoist of some type.

If it comes out the bottom, you still have the man hours in and out of the coach for disconnecting. You also need a facility with a pit or lift able to accomodate this large of a vehicle and you're still dealing with the size, wieght and damage issues during removal and installation.

If the radiator is the same as OTR trucks then replacing the core is actually cheaper than a new radiator. Steel cores usually don't patch well or it is a temporary fix at best. A replacement core is usually the best option for economy. The tanks of OTR units are also bolted on so core replacement is simple and quick.

If you look at it from this perspective along with a shop labor rate of $100 per hr or more, you can see where it gets to $1k fairly easily. You can do it yourself with patience and a helping hand or two for removal and re-installation in the chassis. I always look at how long it will take to do myself as opposed to a shop, my cost for parts or radiator repair, and down time. After this I make the call whether or not to do it or hire it done, and remember your own time has a value even if you aren't paying a labor bill for it.
__________________
Tommy Parker
2007 Newmar Kountry Star 3914, ISL400
2001 Jeep Cherokee toad, M&G brake/2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland
Parkerrs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2011, 07:30 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 437
My nepheu has a rad shop;; I took mine out. You have to take the rear Motorhome cap off; Not a big job just time consuming. Whan you have the rear cap off then you can go to work; Remove the rad. And The intercooler; Clean them BOTH;; To do the complete job would be around $2000.00 at the shop;; If you can even get in to have it done;; Life is good;;
bachler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2011, 08:47 PM   #7
Winnebago Master
 
cbeierl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 1,495
Quote:
Originally Posted by smlranger View Post
Chris, do I understand that you had to replace the radiator? If so, did it start leaking? What was the cost of the radiator itself?

In looking at mine, I would guess the rad/CAC could come out the rear access opening. My dad owned a radiator shop and I worked there when I was a teenager, so pulling and replacing a radiator is something I might try if mine needs replacing before I get too old to do it .
I didn't replace the radiator--it and the CAC needed cleaning that couldn't be done with them in place, so they had to be removed, cleaned, and replaced. I had the crankcase vent tube extended rearward at the same time to (hopefully) greatly reduce the problem of them getting plugged in the future.
__________________
Chris Beierl

2005 Winnebago Vectra 36RD
cbeierl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×