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Old 10-14-2013, 08:32 AM   #1
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2005 Vectra Air Brakes

Just took del'y of a 2005 Vectra 36RD. Couldn't be happier. The Freightliner manual talks about draining moisture from the air tank periodically but I don't see how to do that on the Vectra. Is there a way or is that something for other Freightliner applications. I will probably have more questions as I find my way around this rig.
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Bob
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Old 10-14-2013, 08:43 AM   #2
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Hi and welcome to the forum. Congrats on your new rig too.

I'm sure one of our experts on this will be along soon, but I believe your nave a lanyard inside the right front wheel well which will drain your air when pulled.

Having said that, I don't think it's really necessary unless you live in a very humid area.

Best of luck.

Rick
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Old 10-14-2013, 09:38 AM   #3
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Don't have that type system on my gas powered RV, but with the compressor and tank I use in the garage and the portable I carry in the RV gets drained to air and moisture every couple of months. The moisture in the bottom of the tank can cause a corrosion problem.
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Old 10-14-2013, 10:37 AM   #4
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Hi and welcome, just a word of caution I see one posters said you should not need to drain air tanks if you live in a dry low humidity area that's not true the air tanks should be drained regularly because, as air is heated up when it is being compressed, and then as it cools after the air will form condensation which can eventually get into the valves after the tanks which can cause corrosion or malfunction of the air brake system. I also suggest you read an air brake operators manual or even take an air brake course better safe than sorry.
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:20 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by AISTQM View Post
Just took del'y of a 2005 Vectra 36RD. Couldn't be happier. The Freightliner manual talks about draining moisture from the air tank periodically but I don't see how to do that on the Vectra. Is there a way or is that something for other Freightliner applications. I will probably have more questions as I find my way around this rig.
Thanks
Bob
AISTQM,
Congrats on your new purchase. Our rig is close to being a sister ship to yours. It's an '04 Itasca Horizon 36 GD with the C-7 330 HP CAT. And yes, you should have at a minimum, of "Three" lanyards, hanging around inside the right front wheel well. Many times, they become obscured due to dirt, debris etc. and hard to see. But, they SHOULD be there, unless Winne decided to do something different for your model year. If you have to, get under the coach, safely of course, and find the air tanks. Then you should see, the valves on the bottom, that have the lanyards attached to them, and follow the lanyards back to the point of securement, in or around that wheel well.

And, for what it's worth, we've had our rig now for well over two years and, I've pulled on those lanyards a few times and never gotten even one drop of moisture out of any of those valves. But, you have to do what the factory recommends so, good luck.
Scott

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Originally Posted by RickO View Post
Hi and welcome to the forum. Congrats on your new rig too.

I'm sure one of our experts on this will be along soon, but I believe your nave a lanyard inside the right front wheel well which will drain your air when pulled.

Having said that, I don't think it's really necessary unless you live in a very humid area.

Best of luck.

Rick
Rick, for the most part, you are correct in the fact that it may not be necessary. As stated above, I've pulled on them quite a few times and have never gotten any moisture, what so ever out of them. The air drier must be doing a great job.

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Originally Posted by Abclipper View Post
Hi and welcome, just a word of caution I see one posters said you should not need to drain air tanks if you live in a dry low humidity area that's not true the air tanks should be drained regularly because, as air is heated up when it is being compressed, and then as it cools after the air will form condensation which can eventually get into the valves after the tanks which can cause corrosion or malfunction of the air brake system. I also suggest you read an air brake operators manual or even take an air brake course better safe than sorry.
Abclipper,
Rick was referring to 'High humidity" areas, not low ones. And yes, the air brake manuals do say to bleed the tanks on a regular basis. And, you (or anyone else) would not be in the wrong for doing so. But, in seeing nothing come out of mine, for each and every time, for as long as we've owned it, and the amount of times I've pulled on them, I don't do it as often as they recommend.
Scott
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Old 10-14-2013, 12:11 PM   #6
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AISTQM,
Rick was referring to 'High humidity" areas, not low ones. And yes, the air brake manuals do say to bleed the tanks on a regular basis. And, you (or anyone else) would not be in the wrong for doing so. But, in seeing nothing come out of mine, for each and every time, for as long as we've owned it, and the amount of times I've pulled on them, I don't do it as often as they recommend.
Scott
Following a previous thread on this topic, I asked the shop manager at the Freightliner Oasis shop in Tolleson, Arizona while my coach was being serviced. He said to do it if it made me feel any better, but the chassis does a pretty good job of getting rid of moisture on its own and unless I lived in a very high humidity location life Florida or the PNW.

Rick
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Old 10-15-2013, 06:18 AM   #7
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Thanks everyone, I found them inside front wheel well last night. Biggest trouble I have now is trying to remember which manual I read something.
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Old 10-15-2013, 11:03 AM   #8
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Thanks everyone, I found them inside front wheel well last night. Biggest trouble I have now is trying to remember which manual I read something.
Sir,
Our rig came with a full satchel (about 12" thick) of manuals, operations pamphlets, write-ups, and more of just about every mechanism in and on this rig. While certainly not the best "Mystery Novel" type reading, to me I enjoy learning about how things are supposed to work and, what kind of things to look for when troubles happen.

I've also made some inquiries to Freightliner both by phone and email asking for information on the various operational systems that are normally not supplied in the owners manual package. I've received air system plumbing and routing, J-1939 Data link operations and affiliated connecting components (That J-1939 Data link is the "back bone" of all your gauges and other functions like cruise control, exhaust brake and much more), MMDC wiring and links (works with the J-1939 to present what you read on the gauges), all in a PDF format so, I can pull up anything at any time and look information.

Again, not many guys are interested in this kind of stuff but, since I do about 99.999999% of the repair on this rolling gymnasium, I try and find out what I can about the particular system I'm involved with at the time.
Scott
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