Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-30-2010, 05:10 PM   #1
Winnebago Owner
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 146
'05 Journey 39K Air Source

I just recently purchased a 2005 Journey 39K. There is a compressed air hose fitting above the generator that I thought was for tire inflation. When I tried to adjust the tire pressures the other day I ended up losing air rather than adding as I intended. Turns out that this air source is not adequate for the job even when it has 115 - 120 lbs showing on the gauge.

Is this normal or is there a problem with my system? Seems odd to have such a great accessory yet not have it adequate for the most important use you would have for it.

How do you maintain your pressures while on the road? Lug a compressor with you or only adjust your tire pressures at truck stops? Seems limiting since your tires would be hot by the time you got there.

Bill Burgner
Orlando, FL
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2010, 06:12 PM   #2
Winnebago Owner
 
THutch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jacksonville FL
Posts: 114
Bill,

Did you have the valve to the quick disconnect open? Also, did you have the diesel running? If you don't fire up the engine, you are only relieving the tank, and not running the compressor.
__________________
Tom & Norma - NEW: 2011 Tiffin Allegro Bus 43QRP
OLD: 2005 Itasca Meridian 34H
Toad: 2007 HHR, 4-Down, Blue OX & Patriot Brake
THutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2010, 07:01 AM   #3
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 22
My air outlet works fine on my 05 39K. I have added air to tires.

Ronnie
__________________
2005 Journey 39K
flashnyellow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2010, 10:24 AM   #4
Winnebago Owner
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Western WA
Posts: 209
Once you equalize the coach air pressure with the air pressure level in the tire, you should remove the air chuck from the tire, bleed the coach pressure down till the compressor kicks in and rebuilds it to maximum again. Continue adding pressure to the tire to the point of equalization again and repeat the process. This method will allow you to air up to essentially the same maximum pressures you achieve on the coach air system. Technical term would be reverse cascading.
__________________
'07 Winnebago Journey 34H, ISB-02, MH2500
Toad - '08 Ford Taurus X
Blue Ox, Aventa
US Gear UBS
FleetMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 04:35 PM   #5
Winnebago Owner
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 146
Thanks

Thanks for the replies.

Yes, I did have the engine running and the valve open when I tried to add air, but thanks for the reminder anyway. I will try again the next time I need air and see if I can do any better. I may need to try the suggested reverse cascading approach.

Are any of you using a TPMS and if so which ones? Did you need to do anything special to the rims or stems?

Bill Burgner
Orlando, FL
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2010, 06:04 PM   #6
Winnebago Owner
 
Martind4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Marshfield, WI
Posts: 88
I just attended Camp Freightliner and probably learned just enough to be dangerous. Here's what I remember about using the air manifold as a source to inflate tires. The manifold is fed from the secondary air tank which is also used for front brakes and other accessories (air horn, etc)

The primary tank is used exclusively for rear brakes. Both tanks are connected together and both are protected by Pressure Protection Valves. These valves are used to protect one tank from another by closing automatically at a preset pressure, should a reservoir failure occur. Loss of air from one tank should not drain other tanks if the valve operates correctly

That means your tire filling process will drain the secondary tank and the primary tank still has enough pressure to not kick in the compressor. It was recommended that we add a pressure gauge between the end of the air hose and the air chuck. When you're filling tires and the hose pressure drops below the desired level, have the DW pump the brakes enough to lower the primary tank pressure and kick in the compressor. Resume filling the tire when the hose pressure is high enough.

This makes it a 2 person job but it eliminates finding space for another compressor. I strongly recommend Camp Freightliner!

Note: The engine must be running for all of this to work.
__________________
Denny, Connie & Shadow (former barn cat made good)
2000 Itasca Horizon, Cat 3126B, Freightliner Chassis
Martind4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2010, 11:31 AM   #7
Winnebago Owner
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 146
Good Insights

Denny,
That is an informative post, thanks. I hope to attend a future Camp Freightliner. How big was the turnout for the one you attended?

Bill
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2010, 02:33 PM   #8
Winnebago Owner
 
Martind4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Marshfield, WI
Posts: 88
We had 19 attendees and room for one more. There was one last minute cancellation that kept us from having a full class. They are offering more classes in more locations to meet the need. At a $100 for two full days of class, lunch both days, and a dinner for the attendee and spouse/other, plus notebook of class notes, I think it's a real deal.
__________________
Denny, Connie & Shadow (former barn cat made good)
2000 Itasca Horizon, Cat 3126B, Freightliner Chassis
Martind4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2010, 05:14 PM   #9
Winnebago Owner
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 146
Camp

I plan to attend, just need to fit into the schedule somehow.
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 04:57 AM   #10
Winnie-Wise
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 274
Martind4 has it exactly correct. He did it without the power point pictures Mike from FL uses to explain it too!
MaverickBBD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2010, 11:39 AM   #11
Winnebago Owner
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 146
Pressure Gauge

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martind4 View Post
It was recommended that we add a pressure gauge between the end of the air hose and the air chuck.
Denny,
A quick look at Sears and Lowe's found gauges, but it looks like a 'T' fitting would be required. Is that correct, or did you use something else? There were no fittings in the air tool section that would work. Any reason a brass fitting for propane or water would not work?

Bill
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2010, 01:28 PM   #12
Winnebago Owner
 
Martind4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Marshfield, WI
Posts: 88
I haven't built one yet, but I plan to use a brass tee and one male and one female quick disconnect. The gauge and male disconnect are somewhere in my tool box, all I need is a tee and the female disconnect and the time to put it all together (10 minutes).

It probably won't make a difference if the tee was galvanized or black for compressed air, I just think brass looks nicer.
__________________
Denny, Connie & Shadow (former barn cat made good)
2000 Itasca Horizon, Cat 3126B, Freightliner Chassis
Martind4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 10:06 AM   #13
Winnebago Owner
 
SVTotem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 146
Quick Disconnects

Thanks Denny,
I had not thought of that approach. I was headed towards having a permanent gauge at the end of the hose. I think I will start with your approach and adjust as I get experience with it. Might end up with the 'T' attached to the tire fitting and a quick disconnect at the hose end just to reduce the bulk and weight at the tire since it is already awkward getting to some of the valve stems.

Bill
SVTotem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2010, 10:24 AM   #14
Winnebago Owner
 
Martind4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Marshfield, WI
Posts: 88
Yesterday I dug around in the shop and found an old brass tee of the right size and then purchased a female quick disconnect. I did it this way so I can use the same gauge on my shop air system for spray painting, etc. Thanks for giving me a reason to get this simple project done!

My next step is to try it out and increase the tire pressure 5 psi on all my tires. We had the coach four cornered weighed a couple of years ago and I used the tire charts to determine the optimum pressure. When I look at my tires, they seem to be wearing slightly more on the outside edges, indicating that pressure is too low.

Denny
__________________
Denny, Connie & Shadow (former barn cat made good)
2000 Itasca Horizon, Cat 3126B, Freightliner Chassis
Martind4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2010, 04:08 PM   #15
Winnie-Wise
 
1ciderdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 478
Bill asked: Are any of you using a TPMS and if so which ones? Did you need to do anything special to the rims or stems? (I couldn't figure out how to do the quote many of you use)

I removed the Doran TPMS from my previous motorhome and am using it on my 2004 Journey. I have the aluminum rims and no modifications were necessary to the rims or stems but the fit is a bit tight.
__________________
Bob, Sandi & Marmaduke the Big Pug
SW OREGON 2004 Journey 39K, 330 Cat
If towing: a 2006 Mini Cooper or 1995 Wrangler
1ciderdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2010, 09:25 AM   #16
Winnebago Owner
 
pameridan04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Allentown, PA
Posts: 230
Hi Guys:

I have an air gauge right above my air chuck hook up on my Meridian above compressor. I thought this was original equipment on my rig. Was this added by previous owner?

I just bought a 50 ft air hose and heads and new tire air guage to try and fill tires from this setup. So all this info is good news to me.

I did not get my rig four courner weighed. Can you tell me what approximately my tire pressure should be with a 36ft. Meridan DP? I don't know the size of my tires off hand, they are stock Michelin tires.
__________________
Meridian 2004 36G DP
2010 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
Two HD's for company
pameridan04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2010, 09:50 AM   #17
Winnebago Owner
 
94-Newmar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 70
The tires will have a pressure max molded into the the tire itself.. usually near the tire size and specs. Look closely.
__________________
94-Newmar Kountry Star 40-KSDP
Spartan/Cummins 8.3C-300HP/Allison 3060 WTEC-II/25yr RV Tech RVIA Certified/Onan-Cummins Certified
94-Newmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 05:49 PM   #18
Winnie-Wise
 
1ciderdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 478
Doesn't the sticker on the wall next to the drivers seat give a recommended tire pressure? Personally that's what I'd use until it is weighed.
__________________
Bob, Sandi & Marmaduke the Big Pug
SW OREGON 2004 Journey 39K, 330 Cat
If towing: a 2006 Mini Cooper or 1995 Wrangler
1ciderdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2010, 08:41 PM   #19
Winnebago Owner
 
pameridan04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Allentown, PA
Posts: 230
Hi guys:

Yep sticker on the wall next to drivers seat suggest 105 lbs for the front and 100 Lbs for back tires. And that is what my tires are set for.

I hooked up my new 50 ft air hose and it works great. I added some air to my right outside rear. I get a steady 120 PSI on my gauge from my line.

Thanks for all your help.

Jim P.
__________________
Meridian 2004 36G DP
2010 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
Two HD's for company
pameridan04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2010, 11:09 AM   #20
Winnebago Camper
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTotem View Post
I just recently purchased a 2005 Journey 39K. There is a compressed air hose fitting above the generator that I thought was for tire inflation. When I tried to adjust the tire pressures the other day I ended up losing air rather than adding as I intended. Turns out that this air source is not adequate for the job even when it has 115 - 120 lbs showing on the gauge.

Is this normal or is there a problem with my system? Seems odd to have such a great accessory yet not have it adequate for the most important use you would have for it.

How do you maintain your pressures while on the road? Lug a compressor with you or only adjust your tire pressures at truck stops? Seems limiting since your tires would be hot by the time you got there.

Bill Burgner
Orlando, FL
I went round and round with this exact same thing. Thought about getting a multiplier, another compressor. It all came down to a high quality connector for filling tires. The cheapies can't hold the pressure.

Now maintaining pressure on the road is simple. I know it seems like most tire fillers should work at what they are rated but few really do. If you are buying it from some walk-in store, it is probably not up to the job.

I was about to spend hundreds for an air multiplier or some other gadget and all it took was $20 for a really high quality air filler.
maybesoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
CB Antenna source for Journey Rcdukes Winnebago Class A Motorhomes 8 08-28-2014 02:31 PM
WKP39WD Journey DL CB power source JanBCarter Winnebago Class A Motorhomes 6 08-01-2005 06:24 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Winnebago Industries or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×