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Old 01-13-2020, 08:14 AM   #1
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ACME and AMERICAN tow dollies

We are getting ready to order a tow dolly and have been looking around at different models. The ones offered by dealers here in the Phoenix area are Master, Stehl and Demco and I don't know anything about any of them except the specs that I can see on the websites.

I have also seen online offers for both Acme and American tow dollies, at a lower price, but know even less about those because I can not actually go anyplace to see them.

Since I have no experience with car tow dollies I thought it would be helpful to ask if anyone can give me any information about the online versions, the Acme and American. The guy at American made a big deal about how their dollies are made in the US and use larger tires but it is hard to know what is "market speak" and what is real. I would appreciate any information on the online models that people might have.
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Old 01-13-2020, 06:32 PM   #2
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don't know anything about the online dollies, but i have the Master with built in surge brakes and have been very happy towing our Mini cooper..no problems at all. I do notice a difference with the weight when I put my Grand Caravan on it but that is to be expected...I would not imagine there would be much difference with any of the makes of tow dollies except the ones with brakes or not...I am not an expert so someone correct me if i am mistaken...
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Old 01-14-2020, 05:24 AM   #3
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I can not speak about the brands you are looking at. I can speak about the dolly I have been using for many many miles. I have the Roadmaster dolly with electric brakes. I decided on the electric brakes to take the weight off the dolly tong for moving the dolly around by hand. Make sure you check the width of the dolly. By that I mean, make sure your car will fit. I first tried or caravan and it fit but when making turns the dolly fenders put a nice crease in the door panels. I now tow a kia which give a little more turn room but one still have to watch it.
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Old 01-14-2020, 07:09 AM   #4
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American

I can't speak much to ACME but we've had our American Car Dolly since 2014 and probably have close to 75,000 miles on it. Towed cross the country east west and north south border to border and ocean to ocean many times. Towed with it to Alaska from Georgia and back once on some rough roads. I've towed 2 Ford Focus (not sure how to make Focus plural)Now we frequently tow our rear wheel drive Ranger pick up facing backwards with front down backwards.

I can't say enough good about this dolly or the company--- its the best. I bought it with electric brakes and the spare (which I never used). I'v just started my third set of tires, more for peace of mind than real need. I changed the backing plates and brakes once myself in about 30 minutes and grease the axles about 2X a year-- just because I'm anal about maintenance.

I like the turning pan feature as it does not stress the front end steering of the towed vehicles in turns.

I have thoroughly enjoyed working with Gary at American whenever I have a question I want to clarify. He guided me through a simple add on I wanted with a break away switch. He's a great owner tech rep. He was fantastic delivering the dolly cross country right to where I wanted it. Awesome service!!! Great price. No set up- just put your toad on it and go!.

We used to tow a Cherokee 4 down but gave that up when it decided to break away from the base plate and pass the motorhome. Barely made it through that dilemma. Its been an American Car dolly ever since.

Loading is quick and easy for us. Folks say it takes longer than hooking up 4 down but we found that not to be true. I like the detachable ramps as I don't worry about them popping up and hitting running boards of the car found with with fixed mounted ramps. It takes us about 6-10 minutes to ramp the vehicle on and strap it down. The argument that you have to crawl around in the dirt and mud to strap it is not true -- we have never had to do that and it only takes about a minute for each tire and another 2 minutes to strap the steering wheel- if you don't have steering wheel lock.

The dolly is well built and very tough-- considering where we have been with it I can validate how tough it is! I use a set of tongue wheels on a handle I bought at Harbor Freight to move it easily around the yard (my wife does really does it- not me as she beats me to the task) . I keep the tongue wheels at the house. I also added a drop down dolly wheel on the tongue for maneuvering around camp sites. But the extra tongue roller set up is more to spoil me than real need. One feature I like is that on a short camp site I can drop it off the hitch and roll the rig over it to the rear wheel fenders, making for a good fit in tight spots.

I like the fact I did not need to add a brake controller to the motorhome as the dolly is built with the controller on the dolly (uses the brake light circuit to activate).

We're so glad and thankful we made the decision to go with the American. Its
a great little company and has been perfect for us.
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Old 01-14-2020, 09:04 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Americanrascal View Post
I can't say enough good about this dolly or the company--- its the best. I bought it with electric brakes and the spare (which I never used). I'v just started my third set of tires, more for peace of mind than real need. I changed the backing plates and brakes once myself in about 30 minutes and grease the axles about 2X a year-- just because I'm anal about maintenance.
Do you do the maintenance yourself? Or do you take it someplace to have it done? I am no good at maintenance (mechanical stuff breaks when I just look at it for too long) but would take it in for maintenance if I knew what kind of place did that.

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Originally Posted by Americanrascal View Post
I have thoroughly enjoyed working with Gary at American whenever I have a question I want to clarify. He guided me through a simple add on I wanted with a break away switch. He's a great owner tech rep. He was fantastic delivering the dolly cross country right to where I wanted it. Awesome service!!! Great price. No set up- just put your toad on it and go!.
I spoke with him on the phone a couple of days ago and he seemed very helpful. He mentioned the on-board brake controller but did not say anything about a break away switch. Is that extra? He also said that they will deliver to where ever I want and that the delivery includes setup and that they show how to use the dolly. All of the others expect the buyer to pick the unit up from the freight delivery location.

He also told me that the dolly would stand up in our garage but that I would have to put down some wooden boards for the extensions to sit on. That would be important to use since my wife does not wish to give up half of our garage to the dolly and there is no chance that she would accept the dolly being in our backyard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americanrascal View Post
We used to tow a Cherokee 4 down but gave that up when it decided to break away from the base plate and pass the motorhome. Barely made it through that dilemma. Its been an American Car dolly ever since.
We used to flat-tow but I guess we were lucky that we never had the Jeep we were flat-towing brake away from the RV. Scary.

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Loading is quick and easy for us. Folks say it takes longer than hooking up 4 down but we found that not to be true. I like the detachable ramps as I don't worry about them popping up and hitting running boards of the car found with with fixed mounted ramps. It takes us about 6-10 minutes to ramp the vehicle on and strap it down. The argument that you have to crawl around in the dirt and mud to strap it is not true -- we have never had to do that and it only takes about a minute for each tire and another 2 minutes to strap the steering wheel- if you don't have steering wheel lock.
Setup and dismounting has been a big concern to me since everyone I "talked to" on the forums has said that setup takes 30 minutes or longer.

Gary said that the unit does not come with chains to keep the car on the dolly and that they use an 8000 pound test strap (or some such thing) to safely attach the car to the dolly. Do you find that to be enough? Or do you use chains? Or nothing?

He also said that the dolly can be towed unloaded without issue. Have you found that to be true?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americanrascal View Post
The dolly is well built and very tough-- considering where we have been with it I can validate how tough it is! I use a set of tongue wheels on a handle I bought at Harbor Freight to move it easily around the yard (my wife does really does it- not me as she beats me to the task) . I keep the tongue wheels at the house. I also added a drop down dolly wheel on the tongue for maneuvering around camp sites. But the extra tongue roller set up is more to spoil me than real need. One feature I like is that on a short camp site I can drop it off the hitch and roll the rig over it to the rear wheel fenders, making for a good fit in tight spots.
I am sorry but I don't know what a "tongue wheel" is. Can you elaborate? And where did you get the drop down tongue roller? That sounds like something that would be worth while although I would think it would add to the tongue weight on the RV. Our Fuse specs say that the max tongue weight is 350 pounds so I am a bit concerned about that but I would think that a drop down tongue roller would be a very useful thing to have.

Do you find you need drive-through spaces at campgrounds? That is another concern I have. Some of our favorite parks and spaces are back-in and I wonder just how much trouble it would be to unload so we can back-in to the space and then hook everything up in the morning. This was easy when we flat-towed but I don't know how much trouble it would be using a dolly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americanrascal View Post
I like the fact I did not need to add a brake controller to the motorhome as the dolly is built with the controller on the dolly (uses the brake light circuit to activate).

We're so glad and thankful we made the decision to go with the American. Its
a great little company and has been perfect for us.
All of this is very helpful. Thank you.
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Old 01-14-2020, 05:50 PM   #6
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I'll try to catch everything here. If I miss something ping me again.

I do all (and I mean ALL) the maintenance myself- except changing the tires when I replace them.There is not much to maintain and I would guess I spend about 1 hour a year-- maybe 2 tops. As I mentioned I'm a bit fanatical about maintenance and like to fiddle with it more as a hobby. Really not much to break. Bearings and brakes get checked about once a year when I'm trying to stay off the streets and out of trouble. I'm trying to think of what you may want a shop to maintain--- bearings checked and packed 1X a year maybe. Any tire repair or general shop can do that in an hour. Should be less than $100- but that would likely apply to any dolly. But its so easy its almost fun (a you tube video will show you how as it applies to any trailer). Nothing else much to break. I really keep it hosed down. Dolly's catch a lot of grime and grit from road spray off the rig so hosing it off is a good thing.

I'm not sure too many folks add a break away switch on dollies and I don't see them much on others. Its an add on I wanted as I do believe they are required in some states and Canadian provinces. I think I paid about $30 for the switch and battery. It's a battery that easily bolts right on to the dolly frame (trailers in general)and is wired into the brake power wire which Gary identified for me. It took all of 20 minutes or so to install with just a drill, wrench, screw driver and crimping tools. I occasionally check the battery (just push a button) on the breakaway for a charge and then I charge it if needed. I've changed the break away battery out 1X. Been on there 6 years now.

I can't speak to the dolly standing up, but I suppose its quite easy and possible. I never had a reason to try it. We have plenty of room on our property to maneuver and store the dolly. As I mentioned previously it can be rolled up under our rig (we back over it with the moho) up to the fenders on the dolly (assuming your rig sits high enough). Thus it only sticks out past the rear of the rig , when disconnected from the rig, only about 2-3 feet.

I can only speak to our personal experience in setting it up for a trip. I've seen the same comments you have and we find them laughable. Not sure what the problem is folks have, but the wife and I kind of have a pit crew game we play loading the car on the dolly to hit the road. Best time for us so far was 7 minutes TOTAL! Usually ten minutes at an easy slow pace. We're aging a bit and retired so we tend to poke a bit.For some reason our truck, which we tow backwards seems faster than the cars to load. Folks talk about wallowing around on the ground in the rain to load and strap the wheels??? That's a laugh. The DW puts the straps on while I load the ramps and tie the steering wheel . Sometimes I throw the ramps in the moho, sometimes, on the dolly, sometimes in the back of the truck, sometimes in the car trunk. Depends on my mood. I then use my foot to ratchet down the wheel straps. I know I can find ways to shorten the load from 7 minutes, but I am content with the speed of loading. We'd have to take a 20 minute coffee break to make it a 30 minute job. I don't think my britches have ever touched the ground loading or unloading.

I will grant you initially one might be more slow cautious and timid until you load it 2-3 times.But its a piece of cake and a very forgiving process.

Dismounting is even faster.

I do not use a safety "add on" strap or chain from car to dolly when the car when its on the dolly. Just too much of a pain, no easy place to add one to a Focus, and we have never had a strap come off. At EVERY fuel or rest stop I always check the dolly, hitch, power connection, wheel /bearing temps, tire temps, wheel strap tension. If the ratchets need another click or two I add it with my foot. I have never had a wheel strap failure in all these years and all these miles. What American offers are more than enough. I did upgrade to the heavier strap system they offer. Straps do fray and wear over time and I change them out when they start to show wear. I get them on Amazon for a reasonable price and have seen them at many camping supply stores. But I still have the original set that came with the dolly and would not hesitate to use them again. The upgraded ones wrap the tire better.

Funny (maybe not) story. I had a friend load his truck one time, drove 200 miles, got out and saw he never put his wheel straps on- forgot them. He had it in park and the toad never moved on the dolly! I'm not that brave!

When I tow the rear wheel drive truck backwards I do throw on a quick chain connection between the handle on dolly and loosely around the hitch on the truck. Just more peace of mind.

I have towed the dolly several times without a load on it. You can switch the brakes off as they are not needed and would only lock up the wheels if left on. Some folks say to lower pressure in the tires to keep it from bouncing. I towed from Ft Campbell KY to west of Atlanta- about 6 hours at highway speed empty and had no problem. Brakes off, full inflation- no bouncing.

Let me clarify- NEVER attempt to move the dolly with a vehicle on it and not attached to another vehicle. Too much tongue weight no matter what. I only move the empty dolly around for storage or convenience or at a camp site with NO VEHICLE ON THE DOLLY. You can really hurt yourself and do some damage if you attempt to load or move a disconnected dolly with a vehicle on it.

There are 4 ways I move the empty dolly. I can back it with the rig (I find that a pain and I'm not real good at it but it is doable). I can unhook it from the moho, grab the handle lift it and roll it to wherever I want-- I'm good for about 50 feet on a flat surface like that. It probably weighs about 50 lbs but I do it frequently as long as its flat. The third way is with a wheeled tow dolly hauler for the dolly. Bought it at Harbor Freight and have seen them elsewhere. Just a ball hitch with 2 wheels and a handle that connects to the dolly tongue. Its listed as a "Haul master" at HF (sku 60533) I rarely get to play with that as the wife is always grabbing the dolly with that set up to move the dolly around the driveway and yard (I love her for helping me though). With that set up its a one handed easy peasy move- about like moving a lawn mower. But I don't take that Haul Master set up with me when I travel so I bolted on a drop down caster wheel trailer tongue jack set up (like found on boat trailers). There are a lot of different types of tongue jacks with wheels. I usually use that permanent attachment which simply bolts on, to roll the dolly around campsites in travel. It is important to use one that swings up or retracts so the caster wheel does not drag during travel.

We usually prefer a pull through site if we're making time and just overnight somewhere to avoid connecting and disconnecting. If we 're staying somewhere and will need to use the toad, we often use a back in site to save a few bucks.

Regardless of method when disconnected and unloaded, we easily handle the dolly.

One noticeable difference between 4 down and dolly towing is that one can back up the dolly when loaded for very short distances when loaded with a vehicle. Most I got was about 35 feet before it started swapping up, but it helps to be able to do that- especially if you get in a pinch at a gas pump- gotta be careful though.

At campgrounds I drop the car off --sometimes at the site if I know I will not block traffic- otherwise at the office. Then the dolly is towed just past the site. I unhook the dolly and drop down the trailer jack caster wheel on the tongue and roll the dolly back into the rear of the site.Then I back the rig over the dolly up to the wheel fenders. Sometimes when I have a wide paved or graveled site I roll the dolly off to the side of the site. Works fine. Since 2014 I have only been to 2 RV parks out of several hundred that refused to allow me to keep it on site and made me keep them in a parking storage area locked. I assume your Fuse would be able to back over a good bit of the dolly.


Sorry for the windy epistle but feel free to ping me with any questions

Joe
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Old 01-15-2020, 08:27 AM   #7
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Again, your response was extremely helpful. Thank you for taking the time to be clear and explain your response.

> I think I paid about $30 for the switch and battery.

I did a Google search and was told that it is required on trailers based on their weight, both loaded and unloaded. Did you order yours from American when you ordered the dolly? Or get it after delivery from some place like Amazon?

> Best time for us so far was 7 minutes TOTAL! Usually ten minutes at an easy slow pace.

That is good to know. The time it would take for hooking and unhooking was one of my main concerns and I might have just flat-towed if our car could be towed that way. If it only takes 10 minutes to hook up (and probably 5 minutes to unhook) that is a big relief. Of course it will take practice to figure out what to do, how to do it and the best order for the steps but it is something to base our progress on.

Out of curiosity, can it be done by only one person? I don't know how best to align the wheels with the ramps if there is only one person involved. Normally my wife would steer me correctly onto the ramps but I wonder how it would work if I wanted to go someplace when she is on one of her out-of-town trips.

> The third way is with a wheeled tow dolly hauler for the dolly.

I do have one of those which I also bought at Harbor Freight when we had our small trailer. It was a HiLo telescoping trailer so when it was down I could easily fit it into one of the sides of our garage and I used the hauler to park it properly. When we sold the trailer and bought our previous RV I kept it thinking there might be some use for it later.

> so I bolted on a drop down caster wheel trailer tongue jack set up

Where did you get that. I have done some searching online but not found anything that seems that it would fit.

> One noticeable difference between 4 down and dolly towing is that one can back up the dolly when loaded

When I flat-towed one of my main concerns was always getting into and out of gas stations and the layout of the station became more important to me than the price. There were times when I actually ended up having to disconnect the car, move it and then reconnect it just to be able to maneuver into and out of stations (29 foot Class A, so not so long but with the Jeep probably 45 feet). That does not seem as feasible with a tow dolly but perhaps with the tongue jack it might be possible.
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Old 01-15-2020, 12:24 PM   #8
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Check this SKU at HF 69780, 41005 for a swivel jack. Mine is short and fixed and doesn't have a crank jack- there are tons of these types of swivel jacks for trailers that bolt on in the market place. I've been through 2 or 3 until I found one I liked. They are easy to add on- just a clamp down with bolts set up.

I bought the Hopkins Breakaway battery and switch ($35-$50?). There are many listed on Amazon and the internet in general. Type in Hopkins break away switch and battery or just break away switch and battery. A bunch will pop up and you'll see a wide variety and different costs- almost all less than $50. It was so easy to add on to the tongue. I didn't buy a charger set up with it. I just keep a check on the charge indicator and charge the battery maybe once every 6-8 months if it needs it with my regular battery charger in the garage. Its easier for me to charge the battery in 30 minutes manually than to run a charge wire to the moho.

If you decide to add a breakaway battery box, make sure you locate it as far forward as possible-- too far back and the car bumper may become an issue. I've had not problem where mine is.

When shopping for a tongue jack with caster wheel or the breakaway set up make sure you buy one that will fit on the forward bracing arms or tongue bar of the dolly.

The attached picture shows my set up. Facing the dolly the Haul Master wheels are attached to the ball receiver, the tongue jack caster wheel is raised and locked to the right, the battery box and breakaway switch are further back and to the right of the picture. The break controller and wiring hub is in the box on the left of the tongue as you face this way.


If you do load the car by yourself it may take more time. It definitely can be done by one but its so much easier with the wife guiding me on to the center of the dolly. She slaps the wheel straps over and on the wheels before I get the ramps put away. Then all I do is tighten them. One person can align and load the car on straight alone by setting up tape guides on the car and motorhome so you can line it up yourself. It will take a few more minutes to do it all yourself. But placing the straps on the wheels and strapping the steering wheel is easy. I'm pretty fast strapping the steering wheel on the truck but I tend to wrestle with the car's steering wheel a bit-- not sure why just more room the get around the steering wheel and to the brake pedal in the truck I guess, but we have it down pretty well. I use 2 straps with ratchet from steering wheel to a hook on the brake pedal to hold the steering wheel straight and firm.

The truck has steering lock and I don't need the steering straps but I put them on anyways just in case the pin broke in the steering column. Our previous Ford Focus had a pin lock and I never used a steering strap and all worked just fine. Maybe I get overly attentive and worry too much in my old age?

Many times I have have backed up a few feet (5-10? max) in a gas station with the car on the dolly to get good clearance and alignment. No need to remove the car or dolly. Swing as wide as you can then pull forward to the pump, and go long pulling forward when you leave before you turn. Just have to watch closely with someone spotting or with a good camera on the back if you back up to re- align. Too far and it will swap up and get cross ways. Again-- NEVER unhitch the dolly with the dolly attached to the motorhome with the car on the dolly. I would not even think of using the tongue jack to support a dolly with a car loaded on it. I'm bumping 60-65 feet with my set up so yours should be so much easier to maneuver. I use the RV lanes at Flying J for the most part which are never a problem , but I use regular lanes frequently also. Just know the dolly and car track very well behind the rig and maneuvering should be quite easy.
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Old 01-15-2020, 01:53 PM   #9
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...
Many times I have have backed up a few feet (5-10? max) in a gas station with the car on the dolly to get good clearance and alignment. No need to remove the car or dolly. Swing as wide as you can then pull forward to the pump, and go long pulling forward when you leave before you turn. Just have to watch closely with someone spotting or with a good camera on the back if you back up to re- align. Too far and it will swap up and get cross ways. Again-- NEVER unhitch the dolly with the dolly attached to the motorhome with the car on the dolly. I would not even think of using the tongue jack to support a dolly with a car loaded on it. I'm bumping 60-65 feet with my set up so yours should be so much easier to maneuver. I use the RV lanes at Flying J for the most part which are never a problem , but I use regular lanes frequently also. Just know the dolly and car track very well behind the rig and maneuvering should be quite easy.
Forgot to mention, in tight maneuvers the dolly steer opposite of the tow vehicle initially. In other word if the moho is turning left , the dolly will initially steer right and vise versa. Your tail swing pushed the dolly in the opposite direction initially which really helps on tight maneuvers. Then it straightens and tracks the tow vehicle.
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Old Today, 08:22 AM   #10
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We use to have https://www.towtrailer.com/ before we purchased our new vehicle that can be towed 4 down. We were very pleased with this dolly.
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Old Today, 02:29 PM   #11
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We use to have https://www.towtrailer.com/ before we purchased our new vehicle that can be towed 4 down. We were very pleased with this dolly.
Thank you. I will contact them.
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